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Full text of "Aggie life"

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Oet. 6, 1897 



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VIII. 



INO. 1. 



J. F. CAMnON, 

•PASniONABLE TAILOR.* 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get ray prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTl. 

1^ All suits made in my own work-shops. ^^^^ 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 

J. H. PRINDLE, 

DEALER IN 

inEN'S, YOOTHS' BP BOYS' 

FINE CLOTHING 

AND 

FURNISHING GOODS. 



96 Main Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



THE AKIHERST 

FarnitoFe and Carpet 

A complete line of goods suited to tlie students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, STUDY 
DESKS AMD CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 



CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



All Goods STRICTLY CASH and at 
LOWEST PRICES. 



EI. D. MARSH 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

, Caps, Gloves, Gents' \m g\ 

FINE READY-MADE SUITS. 



I£8. 



Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $.S.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes I Rubbers 



IN TOWN AT 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE, 



"W7-IXjLI.A.3VrS' BX-OCKl. 



G. S. KENDRICK, 



DEALER IN 



Meats and Provisions, 



South side Cutler's Block, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



I liave the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

o^ Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 




HARRY CLARK, 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 





LIBRARY 

U>I1VERS!1Y OF 
ASSACHUSEHS 



liCRST, MA SS. 



VOL. VII) 



AMHERST, MASS.. OCTOBER 6, IE.97. 



NO. 1 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 

Terms $1.00 per year in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Randall D. Warden, '98, Editor-in-Chief. 

Alexander Montgoniery, Jr., '98, Business Manager. 

Frederick H. Turner, '99, Ass't Business Manager. 
George H. Wright, '98. Willis S. Fisher, '98. 

Avedis G. Adjemian, '98. Warren E. Hinds, '99. 
William H. Armstrong, '99. Charles A. Crowell, Jr., '00. 
George F. Parmenter. '00. James E. Halligan, '00. 



Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed to Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 

Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Athletic Association, 
Foot-Ball Association, 
Base-BaH Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 
Ninety-Nine Index, 



W. S. Fisher, Pres. 

J. S. Eaton, Sec. 

R. D. Warden, Manager. 

J. R. Dutcher, Manager. 

J. P.Nickerson, Sec. 

J. S. Eaton, Manager. 

J. R. Dutcher, Manager. 



Cdi'torlals. 



Prosperity ! 



Success to the freshmen class. 



Football subscriptions must be paid at once to the 
treasurer of the Athletic association. 



It is a pleasure to notice all the improvements 
which have been made about the college during the 
summer. 



We take pleasure in welcoming the new freshman 
class. It appears to be composed of good material, 
and, if lacking in quality, it more than holds its own in 



the fresh quantity of the article. As a class it might 
be criticised as lacking ambition, or, in other words it 
might be called slow, but, no doubt, under the benign 
influence of a course in the art and science of keeping 
wide awake, under the able instruction of the class of 
naughty-nought, it will soon recover from its tempor- 
ary " dormant " state. 



The Life is glad to find that there is springing up 
a more neighborly feeling between Aggie and 
Amherst than at one time prevailed. The two col- 
leges do not exist as rivals. It is absurd for petty 
bickerings and jealousies to arise where greater num- 
bers forbid competition on terms of equality. If a 
man will maliciously slander a weaker neighbor he is 
a cad and a snob and is unworthy the consideration of 
manhood. Amhorst has been disposed to show us 
some favors during the past year. Sometime possibly 
we may be able to return them. Be this as it may 
the Life extends a wish for the success of Amherst 
athletes in the Tri-angular league games of '97 
and '98. 



Our military department has been undergoing some 
changes during the summer. The rifle butts have been 
repaired and the latest methods have been used 
in their reconstruction, so that now they are per- 
fectly safe and should aid m.aterially in perfecting the 
markmanship of the cadets, Great pride has always 
been taken in the proficiency which our men have 
shown in target practice, and, as it adds so much 
enjoyment to the dull routine of drill, work in this 
direction should be resumed as soon as the repairs 
have been completed. The fire department has been 
thoroughly renovated, new hose has been provided and 
lanterns and ladders of the latest pattern have been 
procured. The new system of water-works provides 
an ample supply of water in case of emergencies, and 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the high elevation of the reservoir insures sufficient 
force for throwing a stream of water to any required 
height. The cadet officers contrary to the former 
custom will do away with the shoulder-strap as an 
insignia of office, and will wear instead a chevron on 
the arm similar to that in use at West Point. The 
new manual of arms, now in general use throughout 
the army, will hereafter be used on drill. 



Friends, alumni, and students ! Every year it 
becomes the duty of a selected board of managers 
to publish a college paper, an organ of college 
sentiment which shall express the desires and 
wants of the student body, and shall inform 
the outside world of the affairs and management of 
college life. To make such a paper successful two 
things are necessary, it must have finances to support 
it, and it must have contributions from the different 
classes to aid it in maintaining aproper standard. Let 
this only be necessary to remindyou that your subscrip- 
tions are now due and that only in proportion to value 
received can value be given. We intend to publish 
the Life fortnightly and we shall endeavor to give 
value, per face value specie payment received. On 
the second necessity, contributions, very little need be 
said. Aside from the benefit derived from the practice 
of expressing your ideas on paper, every man should 
take an interest in his college paper and strive to put 
it on a par with the best in the country. The board 
of editors cannot be expected to keep up the literary 
department alone. Every college paper relies on its 
contributions. Most college papers of to-day devote 
space to poetry and fiction, these departments require 
a great deal of preparation. It is out of the question 
for one or two men to keep them running, and only by 
contributions is it possible to have satisfactory results. 
We are waiting to see what Aggie can develop. 



The football season of '97 seems to dawn more 
propitiously for Aggie than it has for several years in 
the past. First, impetus derived from the formation of 
a league of New England stat5 colleges has had its 
effect to no small degree and for this league very 
much is due Ralph E. Smith, secretary and treasurer 
of our athletic board. Second, the material for the 
team is of the very bast, and no one man can be sure 
of his position without proving himself the better 



player. And finally we have succeeded in procuring 
a competent coach, Tyler, the famous Princeton 
tackle who is at present coaching Amherst, and under 
his instructions the team is bound to make good head- 
way. There is still a lack of enthusiasm noticeable 
among those who though unable to make the team, 
should nevertheless lend their aid by forming a second 
eleven. Practice is indispensable, and without a 
second eleven practice cannot be satisfactory. Pub- 
lic spirit is the pride of the American people, let us 
be loyal and show our public spirit. We have been 
defeated twice already this season, yet there is no 
great shame in such defeats coming as they do from 
institutions twice yes thrice our size. We can only 
hope to gain experience from such games, but when 
we meet teams of our own class we must win or else 
lose the respect we may have, or, which others may 
have for us. To win these games we must support 
the team well financially and give to it our uncondi- 
tional encouragement, and in repay for this it is no 
more than fair that the players should practice faithfully 
and forego the use of stimulants and tobacco during 
the season of training. Without this training it is as 
useless to entertain hopes of success as it would be to 
hope to take a drive without first harnessing up your 
team. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE MAS- 
SACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
A THLETIC BOARD. 
Section I. 

Art. 1 . The Board shall have control of the athletic 
interests of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
and of any funds or income of any funds that might be 
entrusted to them for athletic purposes. 

Art. 2. The Board shall have the power to raise 
and to collect subscriptions, and in other ways to 
increase the athletic funds of the College. 

Art. 3. The Board shall have advisory power in 
questions of intercollegiate athletic policy. 

Art. 4. The Board shall appoint a resident secre- 
tary and treasurer who shall receive and deposit all 
moneys for athletic purposes whether gate receipts, 
subscriptions, guarantees, or proceeds from benefit 
entertainments. 

Art. 5. All contracts relating to athletic objects 
shall be made by the treasurer or by any authorized 



AGGIE LIFE. 



agent, in the name of and with the approval of the 
Board. 

Art. 6. Moneys shall be paid out by the treasurer 
or by an authorized agent, only with the approval of 
the Board. 

Section II. 

Art. 1 . The Board shall be composed of nine mem- 
bers, viz. : The chief officer respectively of the base- 
ball, football and athletic clubs; (The athletic club 
shall include all field sports except baseball and foot- 
ball) three members of the Faculty, and three of the 
alumni of the College, one of whom shall be a resi- 
dent alumnus who shall also be secretary and treas- 
urer of the Board. 

Art. 2. The chief officer of each of the above 
named associations shall become members of the 
Board by virtue of their respective offices, and their 
membership shall cease upon the expiration of their 
respective terms of office. 

Art. 3. The President of the College, at the com- 
mencement of the fall term of each year, shall appoint 
the three members of the Faculty for the Board. The 
President shall have power to fill vacancies occuring 
among the Faculty members of the Board. 

Art. 4. The three alumni members shall be 
elected as follows : 

(a) One by the student body at a mass meeting at 
the commencement of the fall term of each year. 

(b) One by the faculty at their first meeting after 
the commencement of the fall term. 

(c) One by the associate alumni at their commence- 
ment meeting. 

Art. 5. The term of office of members of the 
Board shall be for one year or until their successors 
are chosen. 

Section III. 
The Board shall have power to fill all vacancies 
occuring in the Board not already provided for in Art. 
3. Sec. II. Members thus appointed shall hold office 
for the unexpired term of their predecessors. 

Section IV. 
Art. 1. The Board shall have the power to frame 
its By-laws, governing time, place and conduct of 
meetings and its procedure in matters brought before 
it for action. 



Art. 2. As soon as possible after the commence- 
ment of the fall term the Board shall be called 
together by the senior faculty member for the purpose 
of organizing and electing a secretary and treasurer 
from the alumni members of the Board. 

Art. 3. Amendments may be made to this consti- 
tution when proposed by two thirds of the Board mem- 
bers and ratified at a College mass meeting. 

BY-LAWS. 
Section I. 

Art. 1 . The officers of the Board shall be a presi- 
dent, vice-president, a secretary and treasurer and an 
executive committee, consisting of five members viz. : 
A faculty member of the Board, the secretary and 
treasurer of the Board, and the undergraduate mem- 
bers of the Board. 

Section II. 

Art. 1 . The election of off icers shall be by ballot at 
the first meeting of the Board after the commence- 
ment of the fall term. 

Art. 2. The officers shall hold terms for one year. 
Section III. 

Art. 1 . At the first meeting of the Board after the 
commencement of the fall term an auditor shall be 
elected who shall be a member of the Board but hold 
no other office in the Board and who shall once in a 
year, audit the accounts of the treasurer and report to 
the Board. 

Section IV. 

Art, 1 . The duties of the president shall be to call 
and preside at all meetings of the Board, 

Art. 2. The duties of the vice-president shall be to 
perform the duties of the president in his absence or 
disability. 

Art. 3. The duties of the secretary and treasurer 
shall be to issue by letter the call for all meetings of 
the Board at least seven days before the hour of meet- 
ing. He shall keep an accurate record of all the 
votes and other doings of the Board in a book pro- 
vided for that purpose, in which also shall be written 
the constitution and by-laws of the Board. He shall 
also record the place, time and score and expense of 
all official games and contests. He shall notify the 
chairman of each committee chosen by the Board of 
his appointment and each individual of any duty 



AGGIE LIFE. 



assigned him by the Board. He shall also receive 
and account for all the money of the Board in what- 
ever way placed in their hands. He shall pay out 
money for all general purposes, only on the written 
order of the executive committee. He shall pay out 
money for the expenses of the single associations only 
upon the written order of the manager of that associa- 
tion some other member of the executive committee 
and the treasurer. All of his accounts shall be kept 
in a book prepared for the purpose, which shall be 
open for inspection at any time to members of the 
Board. 

Art. 4. The duties of the executive committee 
shall be to act upon all questions \vhich shall require 
attention between the meetings of the Board. They 
shall submit all such actions for approval to the 
Board at its next meeting. In all questions of gen- 
eral interest the entire committee shall act, the 
undergraduates, however, having but one vote on 
questions concerning the affairs of any single associa- 
tion. The committee shall consist of the faculty 
member, the treasurer of the Board and the mana- 
ger of the association concerned. 
Section V. 

Art. 1 . The Board shall hold one regular meeting 
each year as provided by the constitution. A special 
meeting may be called at any time by the president 
and two of his members, provided one week's notice 
in writing be given to each of the members. 
Section VI. 

Art. 1. Five members of the Board shall constitute 
a quorum for transaction of business provided there 
be present, at least, one representative taken from the 
faculty, alumni and undergraduates. 
Section VII. 

Art. 1 . No person shall be a member of any team 
who is not an accredited member of the College as 
determined by the books of the^registrar. 
Section VIII. 

Art. 1 . These by-laws may be added to, altered, 
amended or repealed by a two thirds vote of the 
members present at any regular meeting, or special 
meetings called for that purpose, provided that the 
addition, alteration, amendment or repeal is left with 
the secretary and notice thereof given to each mem- 
ber one week, at least, before said meeting. 



Section IX. 

Art. 1 . No manager or other official shall con- 
tract debts to a greater extent than ten (10) dollars 
without the approval of at least three other members 
of the executive committee. 

Art. 2. No manager or other official shall incur 
any expense after all the money subscribed has been 
expended, until he has collected and placed in the 
hands of the treasurer new funds sufficient to cover 
expenses. 

Section X. 

Art. 1 . Each manager shall make his returns to 
the treasurer within three days after each event or 
on his return from a trip. 

Art. 2. The executive committee shall have the 
control of the field' and its appurtenances between 
meetings of the Board. They may also appoint a 
director to have immediate charge of the field. 



BECAUSE OF A POOR MEMORY. 

" Were there many at church to-day, Frank ?" 
asked Mrs. Biglowe of her son as they were seated at 
dinner one Sunday afternoon in the latter part of 
September a few years ago. 

" Yes, quite a number," answered he. 

" Was the sermon good ?" 

" Yes, I liked it very much ; in fact I always like to 
hear Mr. Norton preach, he has such common, every 
day ideas." 

" I wish I could have gone to-day, myself, for I like 
to hear him, too. He is a fine man." And then 
after a slight pause she continued, "What was the 
text ?" 

" Let m.e see — I don't just remember," said Frank 
hesitating. 

" Well what did he have to say anyway," questioned 
his mother almost sharply. 

" Something about Jesus and his mission in the 
world. He also told one or two stories to illustrate 
his thoughts ; but I cannot remember what they were 
either." 

" No, you can't just remember the text, or the ser- 
mon, yet you tell me the sermon was good and .you 
liked it. Humph ! I guess you couldn't 'a paid much 
'tention to it. Why I, when I was a girl if I couldn't 
remember the text and some of the sermon word for 



word, I got scolded roundly for it. I can't see how 'tis 
with you. Well, go on and eat your dinner, and don't 
stare at me that way." 

Mrs. Biglowe was one of those women of the old 
school, brought up in strict orthodox fashion. It gave 
her much pain and displeasure to see her son so 
" careless to the rules of good bringing up." House- 
hold cares and family troubles, the want of the most 
of the pleasures and many of the necessities of this 
world, had driven away her sunny disposition, and had 
made her sharp tongued and irritable. At heart she 
was kind and loving. Never once did she realize how 
words sounded to others. When any of her neighbors 
were in trouble she was one of the first to call and 
offer her sympathy, and to ask if there was anything 
she could do. As for giving comfort in a sick room, 
it was acknowledged by every one throughout the 
village that there was no one like " widow Biglowe." 

Frank was her only son and maintenance. Though 
he was a poor country boy by birth, and always had had 
to work hard ; yet an academic education and his love 
for nature and for books had raised him above the 
ordinary level of a farmer's son. Since he had 
returned from the academy he was thought by some 
to be " stuck up." To be sure he did not lounge 
about with the boys at " The Corners," or at any other 
common congregating place ; still no one could hardly 
say it was because of foolish pride that he did not do 
so. He enjoyed himself far better by remaining at 
home reading and studying. Because his friends could 
not see what " fun " there was in that, they believed 
that he thought himself " too good" for them. 

Little more was said by either mother or son 
during the rest of the meal. At its close Frank, as 
was his custom took a strole over his farm to inspect 
his crops and take a general survey of everything. 
Having done this, which took him about an hour and a 
half, he stepped over a low stone wall and walked in 
the direction of a certain neighbor's house, where he 
usualy spent the remainder of the day till chore-time. 
On this particular Sunday afternoon he passed through 
the woods adjoining his farm, absorbed deeply in 
thought. That silent dinner and many other unpleas- 
ant remembrances kept returning to his mind. Never 
could he remember of having eaten before in such 
cold silence, all because he could not remember the 



text or the sermon. Oh, how he wished he had a clear 
memory for such things ! His mother's sharp words 
of to-day, and those of other days thrust themselves 
upon him, despite his wishes that he could forget them. 

" I wonder," mused he as a new idea came to him, 
" if all women become so irritable. No, it cannot be. 
There is Aunt Nancy who is as pleasant as can be all 
the time. But then, there is Mrs. Brooks who is just 
spiteful. Whew ! I do hope mother will not be like 
her, — and I do not think she will." Suddenly, as he 
was still thinking of other neighbors, some pleasant, 
some unpleasant, the almost sickening thought came 
to him, " Will she ever?" — • 

" Oh, Hullo." 

" Hullo, Frank, I knew you would be coming along 
so 1 came to meet you, you are a little late, you 
know." As she said this she looked smilingly up into 
his face and took his extended hand. 

"Yes, Laura, I am a bit late ; but I was so busy 
thinking that 1 almost forgot you, till I nearly ran into 
you." 

" Forgot me? Well, 1 like that! But say, Frank, 
there is something wrong ; I can see it. Come, tell 
me, won't you? 

'• Yes, dear, of course I'll tell you, and perhaps you 
can help me. It may help you, too," giving her hand 
which he still held in his own, a gentle squeeze. 
Come let us sit down here on this old stump and I'll 
tell you all. You know, mother is sometimes very 
sharp spoken, and she says many things she doesn't 
mean. Well, to-day she asked me the text of the 
sermon; I could not give it to her, nor could I remem- 
ber any of it. She got very angry and all that, and 
did not hesitate to give me a lecture. I do not mind It 
very much, yet I do not like it. When I met you I 
was wondering if you would ever be that way, and 
truly, my dear, it made me feel queer.' 

" No, do not think of that, Frank; it shall not be, 
but don't you remember one of the stories the minis- 
ter told, — the one about the poor woman and a 
preacher ?" 

" Yes, I remember that well. Why couldn't I have 
thought of it this noon ! It was about a poor woman 
who told a minister that she enjoyed his sermons very 
much ; but upon being questioned concerning what he 
had said' she could not tell him," 



AGGIE LIFE. 



" Yes, that was just it. And when he got angry 
because after all she did not renriember what the text 
was, she told him that his words had the same effect 
upon her soul, as water has upon lamb's wool. You 
remember he told this little story to explain his 
thought : 

' Though one may not be able to remember the 
true " Word " as it is given, it has its effect for good 
just the same.' And surely I believe it." 

Thus they sat there, happy in each other's com- 
pany, till the fading sun warned him that he must 
leave and attend to his home duties. 

When he reached home he repeated to his mother 
the story of the morning's sermon, saying in conclu- 
sion : — "That is just the way I feel mother. Some- 
how I can't remember all he says, but I do not forget 
it entirely. It has its good effect upon me and I feel 
better." 

" Well," thought Mrs. Bigelowe as she was prepar- 
ing to go to bed that night, '■ I maybe cross some- 
times ; but things are so different, now, from what 
they used to be. He is a good son, though, after all." 



STORY. 

She was beautiful 1 Small, .perhaps, but she car- 
ried herself with the grace of a queen. I met her one 
Fourth of July, in the evening, and, while the guns 
were banging and the fire-works booming, I held her 
hand. It seemed natural enough, she was so lovely 
and fair, and so fearful of the shooting stars. 

That hand ! How I remember that hand, the 
touch, the soft, velvety, delicate touch ; even now it 
seems to thrill and tingle my nerves with its magnetic 
powe'r. 

A year rolled away, and again I met this fair 
daughter of the gods. She was at the seashore, and 
we strolled along the breakers listening to their mur- 
murings. Tales of love they told, of many a man 
and maid who had strolled on the beach before. I 
stooped and kissed her sweet lips as they pouted in 
vain mockery at my words of love. Ah ! but the 
bliss of that moment! Those red lips were far 
sweeter than the nectar of "the flowers ; they moved 
and vibrated with a thousand tender passions, and 
clung as if glued by cupid's will, and broke away only 
to unite again in sympathy. 

The leaves had fallen when next I sought my dove. 



and the cold blast of the winter's wind swept through 
the hall with an icy shudder. Outside the snow 
flakes fluttered and fell in endless variety. 

There in the dusk she sat in my lap while I 
pressed her tight ; her silken curls clung in masses 
about her head and made a soft cushion upon my 
cheek. I felt her warm breath upon my neck, and 
then, — tears began to come, for this lovely creature, 
this dear little girl, was but four years old and tired of 
kissing her Uncle John. 



FOOTBALL. 
Holy Cross, 4 ; Aggie 0. 

M. A. C. played the first game of the season with 
the strong Holy Cross team at Worcester, Saturday, 
Sept. 25 

Holy Cross won the toss and chose the north goal. 
Aggie had her kick-off and Eaton kicked the ball 
near the goal line. For the first three downs Holy 
Cross gained considerable ground, but after that the 
ball kept changing hands. First Holy Cross would 
have it and then Aggie. Holy Cross finally got the 
bail on her rivals three-yard line but could get no 
farther as the line held like a stone wall. Then 
Aggie pushed the ball back to her 20-yard line when 
time was called. 

In the second half Aggie was determined not to let 
Holy Cross score. As in the first half we battled, 
first one side having the ball and then the other. 
Finally Holy Cross succeeded in scoring a touchdown 
but failed to kick a goal. 

For Holy Cross Linnehan and Shannahan played a 
superb game while for Aggie the line held exception- 
ally well. 

Amherst. 20 ; Aggie, 4. 

Aggie played her second game of the season with 
Amherst, Wednesday, Sept. 29. 

Aggie won the toss and kicked the ball to Whitney 
who was downed in his tracks. Amherst lost the ball 
on a fumble and Aggie rushed the ball through the 
guards and tackles for repeated gains. Aggie finally 
carried it over for a touchdown. This was done with- 
in three minutes after time was called. Amherst 
then rushed the ball down the field until she reached 
her rivals ten yard line where Aggie secured it on a 
fumble. Had Aggie punted at this stage of the game 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Amherst would have failed to score in the first half 
but owing to some misunderstanding the ball was 
passed to Crowell, Time after time Aggie would 
gain through Amherst's line for the required distance. 
Amherst was very strong behind the line, Whitney and 
Kendall excelling. Rosa and Ballantine also played a 
good game for Amherst. 

Aggie was noticeably weak on the ends and behind 
the line. The line-up : 



AMHERST. 

Ballantine, I.e. 
Watson, 1. t. 
Walker, 1. g. 
Winslow, c. 
Lewis, ) , 
Dudley, ) 

Elam, r.t. 



AGGIE. 

r.e., Halligan 

r.t., Eaton 

r.g,, Cooke 

c, Parmenter 



r-g- 



l.g., Stanley 



i.t 



Beaman 
Turner 
I.e., Walker 



q.b. Dorman 

( Crowell 
< Rogers 
( Baker 
f.b., Gile 



h.b. 



Rosa, r.e., 
Pratt, I „ , 

Kendall, ) 
Godfrey, > h.b. 
Whitney, ) 
Griffin, f.b. 

Score, Amherst, 20 ; Aggie, 4. 

Aggie, 10; New Hampshire, 4. 

Aggie played her first home game of the season, 
Saturday, Oct. 2, with the New Hampshire State 
College, winning by the score of 10 — 4. The score 
does not show the game at all. Aggie had the ball in 
New Hampshire's territory during the whole game and 
would be just about to score when it would be lost on 
a fumble. 

Once the home team had the ball on their five- 
yard line and another time within half a yard of goal 
only to lose the ball on fumbles. 

On one of these flukes Calderwood captured the 
ball and ran eighty-five yards for a touchdown. 

In the second half New Hampshire kicked off to 
Cooke who was downed in his tracks. Then Aggie 
rushed the ball down the field for a touchdown. 
Eaton kicked the ball but it was no goal. Again New 
Hampshire kicked off and Eaton punted the ball to 
their forty-yard line from which it was carried down 
the field for another touchdown and Eaton kicked the 
goal, Aggie was on her way for another touchdown 
when time was called. 

The New Hampshire team played a plucky game 
but were simply outclassed by the snappy work of the 



Aggie team 
played well. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Hunt, I.e. 
Wright, I.t. 
Butterfield, l.g. 
Givens, c. 
Whittemore, r.g. 
Sanborn, r.t. 
Hancock, r.e., 
Lewis, q.b. 
Wilson, r.h.b. 
Mathers, l.h.b. 
Calderwood, f.b. 

Referee— Demeritt. 
gomery and March. 



For Aggie Otis, Beaman and Eaton 
The line-up : 

AGGIE. 

r.e., HaUigan 

r.t., Eaton 

r.g., Cooke 

c, Parmenter 

l.g., Stanley 

I.t., Beaman 

I.e., Walker 

q.b.. Canto 

r.h.b., Crowell 

l.h.b., Otis 

f.b., Gile 

Linesmen — Mont- 



Umpire — Smith. 



Now that the foot-ball enthusiasm is at its height. 
It seems only fit that we should have a little of this 
spirit shown in other things. A Glee Club is an organ- 
ization which every college should have. We have 
always had a musical organization representing our 
college and this year we should have the best club 
that the college has ever produced. The men will be 
thoroughly trained and anyone who has any music in 
him, should try to make the club a successful one. 
The music in one sense is the life of a college and if 
that drags, it deadens the life of college immeasurably, 
A college that is well represented in this line, is 
known everywhere and for the best interests of M. A. 
C. every student should give his hearty co-operation 
to the Glee Club. 

* 
Fellows ! You have done well. Your captain has 
been faithful and has worked hard and you have 
backed him up in a first class manner. Practice 
makes perfect. You have stuck to that and if you 
stand by that principle in the future the result will be 
what we all wish it to be. You have played only three 
games but in those games the weak and strong points 
of our team have been shown up. It now remains 
for you to strengthen your weak and to perfect your 
strong points. There is a good amount of material in 
college and this material carefully trained will make a 
team even stronger than our present one. The 
results thus far have been very encouraging and you 
have played in a manner worthy of commendation. 



8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



There has perhaps been more done this fall to put 
a good foot-ball team upon the field than in many- 
years previous. Our captain and our manager have 
undoubtedly worked hard and are to be congratulated 
upon having procured so good a coach as Mr. Tyler. 
Coach Tyler comes from Princeton college where he 
has played for the last three years on the 'varsity 
eleven. He has put new life into the men and shown 
us many valuable tricks and plays. Our fellows 
though light are playing a very creditable game and it 
only needs experience to develop a strong eleven. 
The new league of State Colleges which has been 
formed Is no doubt an excellent thing and much 
credit is due to Prof. Smith for his work along this 
line. We have nevertheless several practice games 
before we meet the league teams but if we wish to be 
successful in the latter we must do our best in the 
former. Eight, six, ten, bang! And let every man 
get into the push. 

The more we get, the more we want but there 
must be a limit somewhere. There has been some 
talk of having a training table bat under the present 
circumstances it seems hardly advisable to have one. 
It would no doubt be very beneficial to all concerned 
if we could bear the extra expense. Our captain and 
our manager have done more than is usually done and 
I think we should perhaps be content with what we 
now have, nevertheless if such a step could be taken 
it would be appreciated and everyone work harder for 
the success of the eleven. 



— First down 1 
— Three yards to gain ! ^ 
— Say, I've been to Cattle Show 1 
— The Batallion is having practice in the new 
manual of arms. 

— The Base Ball officers for next season are Eaton 
'98, Capt., and Dutcher '99, Manager. 

— The chair of Mathematics, left vacant by Prof. 
Metcalf, is now filled by Prof. Ostrander. 

— Lieut. Wright has moved into one of the new 
houses on the Nash property on N. Pleasant St. 



— Pay you subscriptions ! 

— The following men have joined the D. G. K. 
society, F. A. Merrill, J. Baker, J. Barry and Jones. 

— The following men have joined the Q. T. V. 
Society . T. Casey, Curtiss, W. Judd, G. C. Clarke, 
R. J. Smith, J. H. Todd. 

- — On Sept. 25th, our football team was defeated by 
Holy Cross at Worcester, in a slow and uninteresting 
game by a score of 4-0. 

— The seniors are having a new course in Military 
Science, using for a text book Captain Petit's " Ele- 
ments of Military Science." 

— Students in North College will appreciate the bath 
rooms that are being put in on the ground floor, open- 
ing off from the West entry. 

- — The Junior class has elected the following 
officers ; Pres., D. A. Beaman ; vice-pres., B. H. 
Smith ; sec, J. R. Dutcher ; serg't at arms, A. A. 
Boutelle. 

— The class of 1900 has elected the following men 
for the class Index Board: A. D. Gile, H. E. Walker, 
F. A. Merrill, A. F. Frost, H. E. Baker, A. C. Mona- 
han, F. G. Stanley. 

— A good floor is being put in the basement of 
South College, making an excellent place to leave 
bicycles. Why not put in some lockers for the conven- 
ience of our athletic teams? 

— On the 23rd of Sept. the Agricultural Division of 
the senior class went to Greenfield to the Franklin Co. 
Agricultural Fair, where Prof. Cooley gave the class 
some points on sizing up stock. 

— The Athletic Board appointed by the Faculty Is : 
Lieut. W. M. Wright, pres. and executive com.; Prof. 
R. S. Lull, vice-pres.; Prof. J. B. Paige, auditor. 
Appointed by the students, Prof. R. E. Smith, treas. 

—The following men have joined the College 
Shakespearean Club. M. F. Ahearn, W. A. Dawson, 
E. S. Gamwell, F. E. Hemenway, C. W. Jones, H. 
A. Paul, C. L. Rice, M. A. Campbell, Leslie, F. F. 
Cooke. 

— The Hampshire Agricultural Society held its 
Annual Fair Sept. 28 and 29th. According to the 
usual custom the students had a holiday in order to 
attend the Fair. Some of the seniors and juniors 
acted as judges of fruit and vegetables. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— Quite a delegation of Students attended the Band 
Concert at N. Amherst, Wednesday eve., Sept. 15th. 

— At last we have a large freshman class, both in 
size and in numbers. Of course some of the men are 
conditioned in mathematics, but if they give those 
branches due consideration, they may be able to over- 
come the geometric-algebraic obstacles. 

— The sophomore class has elected the following 
officers: Preas. A. D. Gile ; vice-pres., F. A. 
Merrill , sec. and treas., A. C. Monahan ; historian, C. 
A. Crowell ; class capt., F. G. Stanley ; football capt., 
W. R. Crowell ; serg't at arms, G. F. Parmenter. 

— On Sept. 29th " Aggie " took advantage of 
Amherst's weak line, and by terrific drives at centre 
and at tackles, rapidly rushed the ball down the field 
for a touchdown. But Aggie was unable to keep up 
the swift pace she started in with and Amherst won 
out 20-4. 

— The work of the football team is encouraging. 
Coach Tyler of Princeton is training the team, assisted 
by Captain Beaman. What we want now is a second 
eleven on the field promptly at quarter after twelve. 
With a good second eleven to line up against, we will 
develop a team of which to be proud. 

— The freshmen have elected the following officers ; 
Pres., Gordon ; vice-pres., H. J. Moulton ; sec. and 
treas., M. A. Campbell ; historian, C. L. Rice ; foot- 
ball capt., A. R. Doran ; rope-pull capt., F. F. 
Cooke; class capt., H. A. Paul; football manager, 
G. C. Brooks ; serg't at arms, Geo. Bridgefoith. 

— The following men have joined the Phi Sigma 
Kappa Fraternity; H. J. Moulton, T. Graves, Jr., P. 
C. Brooks, L. A. Root, V. H. Gurney, W. C. Dicker- 
man, E. L. Macumber, J. H. Chickering, C. A. 
Boutelle, A. R. Dorman. A. C. Wilson, and two Post 
Graduates, A, M. Candell from Oklahoma State 
College and W. W. Stevens, a Harvard Univ. man. 

— On Oct. 4th the Senior class elected the follow- 
ing officers: Pres., C. N. Baxter; vice-pres., A. 
Adjemian ; sec. and treas,, C.G.Clark; committee 
for class canes, A. Montgomery Jr., J. S. Eaton; his- 
torian, A. Montgomery Jr.; class capt., A. Adjemian ; 
reading room^ directors, J. S. Eaton, G. H. Wright ; 
flower-bed com,, A. Montgomery Jr., G. H. Wright, 
C. G. Clark ; leader of cheering, J. P. Nickerson, 



— The Football Manager has arranged the following 
schedule of games : — 
Sept. 25, Holy Cross at Worcester. 

" 29, Amherst at Pratt Field, Amherst. 
Oct. 2, New Hampshire State College at Amherst. 
6, Wesleyan at Middletown. 

" 9. Trinity at Hartford. 

" 16, Open date. 

" 23, Williston at Amherst. 

" 30, Open date. 
Nov. 6, Winner of Conn, and R. I. at Amherst. 
13, Maine University at Bangor. 

— The Sunday Times Herald of Chicago gives an 
account of a bicycle trip of the Highland Park Cadets, 
under the leadership of Maj. R. P. Davidson, Com- 
mandant of the Northwestern Military- Academy. 
Maj. Davidson is an " Aggie " ex-'92 man. His 
record of the trip is full of interest. The party took 
fourteen days for the entire distance. The boys took 
no special training for the trip and all were in good 
condition at the finish, many of them weighing more 
than they did at the start. They did all their own 
cooking and carried about forty-five pounds baggage 
per man, including rifles. 

— On Sept. 15th the Senior Division in Horticulture 
enjoyed a carriage ride to No. Hadley with Prof. 
Maynard, to see the fruit orchards of Mr. J. W. Clark. 
About twenty-five hundred baskets of peaches had 
already been picked and marketed. Some of the 
later varieties were not then ready to be picked, so 
that a fair estimate of the whole crop would be aboat 
thirty hundred baskets. Mr. Clark will also harvest 
several hundred barrels of apples. Besides apples and 
peaches this extensive fruit farm produces choice 
pears, plums, quinces, currants and berries in their 
season. 

— The annual reception of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association tendered to the incoming class was 
held in Stone Chapel, Friday evening, September 17. 
About eight o'clock in the evening the students began 
to gather in the reception room of the chapel, which 
was very tastefully trimmed with hydrangea, potted 
plants and ferns. The following members of the fac- 
ulty were present with their wives : Mr. and Mrs. 
Levi Stockbridge, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Goodell, Mr. 
and Mrs. F. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. James Paige, Mr. 



10 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and Mrs. Ostrander, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Babson, 
Professors Wellington, Mills and Flint. One of the 
new aims of the reception was to make it as informal 
as possible and to get the new m.en to meet all the 
Professors, and make the entire reception as '• soci- 
able " as possible. The members of the association 
who had this matter in charge feel that this purpose 
was truly accomplished. Later in the evening refresh- 
ments were served. It is estimated that about one 
hundred and twenty-five were present. Since the 
reception about ten of the new men have joined as 
active members and about the same number as asso- 
ciate members. Thus the association starts out suc- 
cessfully this year and let us all help in keeping up this 
important department of our college life. 



vimni. 



77. — R. Porto, sub-director of the museum of 
Natural History and Ethnography at Para. Brazil. 

'86. — D. F. Carpenter, principal of Deerfield Acad- 
emy and Dickinson High School, Address, Deer- 
field, Mass. 

'90. — D. W. Dickinson has gone to Berlin, Ger- 
many, to practice dentistry. 

'93. — F, H. Henderson writes, " I take pleasure in 
announcing to my friends through the Aggie Life, the 
birth of a daughter, Sept. 4." The Life joins in 
congratulations. Home address of Mr. Henderson is 
204 Cross St., Maiden, Mass. 

'93. — Married at Greenfield, Mass., Sept. 2. Mr. 
A. T. Beals and Miss Jessie Richmond Tarbox. 

'95. — T. P. Foley, student at Harvard University. 

'95. — G. A. Billings, chemist. Walker Gordon 
Laboratory Co. Address, 2112 Mich. Boulevard, 
Chicago, 111. 

'96. — S. P. W. Fletcher received a $500 fellow- 
ship in the Horticultural Dept. of Cornell University. 
Address, 46 Hazen St., Ithica, N. Y. 

'96. — H. C. Burrington is asst. supt. of farm of L. 
W. Smith '93, at Manteno, 111. 

'96._I. C. Root, East Greenwich, R. I., Box 15. 

'96. — F. H. Read has accepted a position as 
instructor in the New York Business Institute, 81 
East 125th street. 



'96. — B. K. Jones is assistant in department of 
foods at Hatch Experiment Station. 

'97. — The following list of names have been re- 
ceived from C. A. Peters, secretary of the class : — 

G. A. Drew. Asst. Horticulturalist, Mass. Agr'I 
College. Address, Amherst, Mass. 

G. D. Leavens, Asst. Chemist, Hatch Experiment 
Station. Address, Amherst, Mass. 

C. A, Norton, Chemist for the Lovell Dry Plate 
Co., 94-96 Cross St., Portland, Maine. Address, 1 19 
Pearl St. 

C. F. Palmer, Stockbridge, Mass. 

C. A. Peters, Asst. in Chem. labratory, Mass. Agr'I 
College. Address, Amherst, Mass. 

J. A. Emrich, Amherst, Mass. 

C. I. Goessmann, Asst. Chemist at Hatch Experi- 
ment Station. Amherst, Mass. 

P. H.Smith graduate student at the Mass. Agr'I 
College. 

H. F. Allen is with C. F. Palmer, Stockbridge, 
Mass. 

J. W. Allen, Mt. Auburn, Mass., with L. L. Daven- 
port, Market Gardener and Florist. 

H. J. Armstrong, graduate student at the Mass, 
Agr'I College. Address. Amherst, Mass. 

L. W. Barclay, ex.-'97, on the estate of C. A. 
Griscom, Haverford, Pa. 
' J. M. Barry, Boston, Mass. 

J. L. Bartlett, Salisbury, Mass. 

L. L. Cheney, Southbridge, Mass. 

L. F. Clark, attendant at Dr. Brown's Institute, 
Ware, Mass, 

M. E. Cook, ex-'97. Market Gardener and Florist, 
Shrewsbury, Mass. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 
The Neiu Psychology hy Dr. E. W. Scripture, Direc- 
tor of the Yale Psychological Laboratory, and The 
Psychology of the Emotions, by Th. Rebot, Professor 
at the College of France are the titles of two recent 
publications of the Contemporary Science Series. 
Both have just been placed in our library. The scien- 
tific method of original investigation in the laboratory 
which has done so much for physiology, biology and 
the physical sciences has at length come to be applied 
to psychology. Formerly it was thought that the 
science of the same was to be advanced simply by the 



AGGIE LIFE. 



IX 



testimony of consciousness without the aid of any 
nnaterial apparatus. But Pres. Hall of Clark Univer- 
sity and his pupil, Dr. Scripture, and Prof. Ladd of 
Yale have shown the value of the new method of 
observing and recording the time of sensation, of 
thought, of volition, the energy of psychical action and 
the space involved in the use of the senses. The 
facts noticed are of great interest and importance. 
Prof. Rebot classifies.defines.and explains the emotions 
in accordance with the premises and principles of the 
philosophy of the evolutionist, showing how physiology 
and biology have advanced knowledge of the human 
body to such an extent as to enable the psychologist 
to give a rational account of the origin and develop- 
ment of the emotional nature of man. Both these 
books are of value to the student who wishes to know 
the nature of his own brain and heart, whence come 
thought and feeling. Why should not the man who 
takes great care of his scientific apparatus take equally 
as good care of his own thinking machine and source 
of emotional power ? 

The Story of the Earth's Atmosphere is one of the 
latest books written by Douglas Archibald, and any 
one interested in the origin and height, the nature 
and composition, the pressure and weight, the temper- 
ature and all the laws governing the atmosphere, will 
find this little book of one hundred and ninety pages 
which is fully illustrated, of great interest and of great 
value. 

The Principles of Fruit Growing, by Prof. L. H. 
Bailey of Cornell is one of the most valuable books 
in the Rural Science Series. The book is fully illus- 
trated with pictures of fruit from the shrub to the full 
grown tree and the implements that are necessary in 
this branch of study. The Inventory of fruits. The 
Outlook for fruit growers. The Location and its Climate, 
The Tillage of Fruit Lands, Diseases, Insects and 
Spraying are the headings of some of the best chap- 
ters of this book. 
I 

I The latest book in The International Scientific 
iSeries that has come into our college library is The 
Aurora Borealis, by Alfred Angot. The eighteen 
illustrations greatly increase the interest of one who 
desires to learn of the grand atmospheric polar region. 
jAlthough the history of the optical phenomena of 
nature is but slightly understood yet it has a history 
and theories relating to this subject are treated in a 
very interesting manner. 



R. R. TIME TABLE. 

Boston & Maine, Southern Division. 

Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware, Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.16, a. m., 2.31 p. m., Sundays 
6.09 A. M. 

Returning leave Boston at 8.45 a. m., 1.30, 4,00 p. m. 
Sundays 1.30 p. m. 

For Worcester 6.09, 8.16 a.m.. 2.31 p.m. Sundays at 
6.09 A. M. 

Returning leave Worcester at 9.15 A. m., 2.25, 4.58 p, m. 

6.09 A. M. and 2.31 p. m. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the Ware River Branch of the B. & A. and the 6.09, 
8.16 A. M.. and 2.31 p. m. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton, at 7.40 
10.20 a. M., 11.35, 1.15, 4.40, 5.14, 7 28, 8.40 p m. Sundays, 
10.45 a. m., 5.19, 8.30 p. m. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55, 8.00, 8.50 a. m., 
12.30, 2.15, 4.20, 6,00, 8.20 p. m. Sundays, 5.55, 10.20 a. m., 
7.35 p. m. 

Trains connecting with the Connecticut River R. R., going 
south leave Amherst at 7.40, 10.20, a m., 12.05, 1.15,4.40, 
5.14, 7.30, 8.40 p. m. Sundays 10.45, a. m., 5.19, 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R., going 
north, leave Amherst at 10.20 a. m., 1.15, 7.28 p. m. 

New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the 
south at 7.05 a. m.. 12 14, 5.57 p. m. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.08, 11.50 A. m., 8.05 p. m. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north at 8.20, 
11.00 a. m., 7.10 p. M. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. & A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at the Library from 2 to 
4 p. M. every day except Saturday and Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at the Botanic Museum 
from 4 to 5.30 p. m. on Wednesdays, and on Saturdays from 
3 to 5-30 p. M. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday ; on Saturday from 8 a. m. 
to 12 M., from 1 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. ; on Sun- 
day from 12 to 3 p. m., for reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 6 
p. M. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. m. except Sundays and the 
Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 7-15 and 
11 A. m. and 4 and 6-15 p. m. 

The zoological museum will be open daily at 2-15 p. m. 
except Tuesdays and Sundays. 



12 



AGGIE LIFE. 




(ilatehmakeF and Optieian. 

Prompt skillful atte7ttion given to all fine 
and complicated watchwork. 

A. B. CALL, 

273 Hain St., 

Society * Catering. 



MEALS SERVED IN NORTH AMPTON.^,^ 
GIVE US A CALL. 



E CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 
Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods, 

We cater especially to the stu<lent trade. Our stock of Paper 
Covers, Note Hooks, larccst and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALU. 



Over 4,000 vacancies. Faithful service guaranteed. Boc 
■witii free plans, 10 cents. Blanks free. Address, 

Southern Teachers' Bureau, Louiscille, K| 



60 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE. 




MARKS* 
DESIGNS, 
COPYRIGHTS &o. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain, free, whether an Invention is 
probably patentable. Communications strictly 
confidential. Oldest agency for securing patents 
In America. We have a Washington ofiBce. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the 

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, 

beautifully Illustrated, largest circulation of 
any scientific ioiu-nal, weekly, terms J3.00 a year ; 
$1.50 six months. Specimen copies and llAim 
Book ok Patents sent free. Addresi 

MUNN & CO., 
361 Broadwavi New York. 




■ ■ ■ UO BOB 




ieycles 

The Hartford Sin- 
gle-Tube Tires with 
which Columbia 
Bicycles are fitted 
are the standard 
tires. None equal 
them in comfort, 
durability, or ease 
of repair. 

The Columbia Art Catalogue Is free 
if you call. 




Aggie lifS. 



SPECIAL DRIVE. 




96 KEATING BICYCLES 



SEIE Tiai-^T OlUIS'^rE. 



iMBMTIM© ©1 




PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 

A.. J. »OMiiL,r^A.ie^, 

Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



OA.rv.- 



-ooA.rv. 



THOMAS C. DILLON, 

DEALER IN 

ARD AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Besidbnce, South Prospect St. 



AGENT. 



Lo7)elly 



The Photographer, 

To the class of '97 M. A. C. MAKES A SPECIALTY 
OF COLLEGE WORK. 




Tiie Leading Piiotograplier 



I— «i 



j^— s 



OF WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS. 

I'^ork Guaranteed or money refunded. Give us a trial. 

102 Main St., opp. Court House, 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

ire and Life Insurance Agents. 

I REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Class and Athletic Gropus, &€. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stocli, and always fresh, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



E, K. BENNETT 

Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmakei 



First door from Post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD" WORK GUARANTEED 



AGGIE LIFii. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BROWN, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS. 

Amherst, Mass 



Cutler's Block, 



OFFICE Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 




S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 

A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



(Dassaehasetts flgrieultupal College. 

AT THE 

GOLIiSai: FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Percleron Horses and MM M 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplu 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mas; 




aGGiii LIFE. 



E. H. mCKINSDN, D. B. B. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

e TO 12 .A.. IvI., 1-30 TO 5 T'. 3VC. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



M. N. SPEAR. 



J 

WALL PAPEES AND BORDERS. 
SBCONO-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT ano SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 



G. M. 

Liverv and Feed Stable. 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 



?HOENIX ROW AMHERST, MASS 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOM EVKRTBODT. 



HEADQUA RTERS FOR AGGIE STUDENTS. 

HAIR DRESSING ROOMS. 

KAZORS HONED, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amherst House Annex, Amhekst, Mass. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, . - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, PISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calla responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

IS"CrBBEIS O-OOHDS- 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



JUS" Repairing done while y ou wait.^i 
g PSCENIX ROW. 




AMHERST COLLEGE 

*Co-Operative Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovatiii Estalilisliment. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Worlc talcen Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

SS^srS A-TISFA-OTIOlSr Ca-XJA.RA.X<rTBBID. it>S=^ 

Office : 

Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 



^tmae'a Bam, 



Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Amherat, Mags. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 

Mvepy, peed and Boarding Stable 

Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 16-4. 

CowLES Street, Aggies give us a trial. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Tpewntere Wen, soin, EicMen eDn Bspairel 

TYPEWRITERS RENTED $3.00 PER MONTH. 

Rent allowed towards tlie purchase price. 



iu stock. When ordering SUPPLIES send us name and number of your TYPEWRITER. 

Send for latest catalogue of 

NEW FRANKLIN TYPEWRITER, PRICE $75.00. 
CUTTEIR TOWEIR CO., 

12 A. Milk Strtet, BOSTON, MASS. 

Established 1845. Tel. 2423. 



CAKKwa & AOMH^USt 



AMHa$t, Aa$$. 



CHARLES G. AYRES, 

SINGLE AND DOUBLE TEAMS 

4®"At Reasonable Prices.^ffifr 



Practical Horseshoer, 

Rear of Purity Bakery, 
AMHERST, MASS. 

g^^Best of work guaranteed. .^^ 

J. H. WEISTTZELL, 

No, 2 Cook's Block, 

pipst Class HaiP Cutting and Shaving. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBER'S SUPPLIES 
ALWAYS ON HAND. 

j8®-qive: me: a trial..-» 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



RiVBB Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



Our store has been repaired and improved throughout, and 
our stock of 

FurniiB, Carpets, Drapei"ies,8lia(l8s, etc, 

is all new. "We solicit an inspection. 



H. B. EI 

25 and 27 Pleasant St., 



Northampton, Mass. 



MASS./GRIGULTUI[AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHKKST. MASS. ^ 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public^ 

generally, that we are prepared to supply ; 

in limited quantities ' 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUB^ 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 
all at the lowest price. 
For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and ^mall Fruits, addresi 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MAS'. 



FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.06 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go ^ 



O. O. OOILIOH. 



AQQIE LIFE. 



VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST, MASS.. OCTOBER 20, 1897 



NO. 2 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 

Terms $1.00 per year in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Randall D. Warden. '98, Editor-in-Chief. 

Alexander Montgomery, Jr., '98. Business Manager. 

Frederick H. Turner, '99, Ass't Business Manager. 
George H. Wright, '98. Willis S. Fisher, '98. 

Avedis G. Adjemian, '98. Warren E. Hinds, '99. 
William H. Armstrong, '99. Charles A. Crowell, Jr., '00. 
George F. Parmenter. '00. James E. Halligan, '00. 



Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed to Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 

Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Athletic Association, 
Foot- Ball Association, 
Base-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 
Ninety-Nine Index, 



W. S. Fisher, Pres. 

J. S. Eaton. Sec. 

R. D. Warden, Manager. 

J. R. Dutcher, Manager. 

J. P.Nickerson, Sec. 

J- S. Eaton, Manager. 

J. R. Dutcher, Manager. 



£cl!4:or!als. 



New Chevrons. 



Goals from the field. 



221—21—21—2121—3! 



Odds ten to one on the game next Saturday. 



Of the events of a purely local college color ; 
one special to Aggie, and of no connection to other 
institutions, none is so exciting and enjoyable as the 
annual rope pull of the freshmen and sophomore 
classes. As a means of establishing the superiority 
of one class over another, it is perhaps without a 



criterion. It establishes a contest worthy of no small 
preparation without containing the brutality so often 
resorted to in many of those class fractions. The 
recent contest which took place probably broke the 
record in the completeness of the victory. College 
tradition fails to record any class victory of its equal. 
We should be glad to hear from any of the old 
grads should they remember a parallel to forty three 
feet of rope behind the winning team's anchor. 



The Natural History Society has been in the past 
few years a very interesting and instructive organiza- 
tion. Under its auspices numerous educational 
lectures have been delivered by members of the 
society and by men from other institutions of recog- 
nized authority in their various lines. Frequently stere- 
opticon views have been introduced to illustrate the 
subject, thus making the lecture of more than ordinary 
interest. Last year " Scenes from snap shots in 
Europe" proved one of the most interesting lectures of 
the course, and from the first, the greatest interest has 
been manifested. We hope the proper authorities 
will at once set about organizing for the following 
winter. Several of the original founders are in our 
midst, and will undoubtedly do their utmost to see the 
society on a prosperous footing. Means should be 
taken at once to arrange a promising schedule for 
lectures during the winter and every freshman should 
make it a point to join at the first opportunity. 



Of recent years it has been gratifying to observe 
the increased renown which several of our educational 
departments have gained for themselves by their new 
and advanced methods of scientific investigation. 
Each year finds some of our instructors on a pilgri- 
mage at German universities, there perfecting them- 
selves in all the branches relating to their particular 
work. This has not failed in its result and to-day we 



M 



AGGIE LIFE. 



feel the effect in the large increase of students in the 
Post Graduate course. It is gratfying to find repre- 
sented upon our books men from the two chief univer- 
sities of the east, while colleges even west of the 
Misssouri are not without their representatives. A 
very percentage of large last year's graduating class has 
returned to the institution with the intention of further 
continuing their study. We call attention to these 
facts because they show more than ever the increased 
efficiency which is beginning to be felt in our courses 
on Natural Science. 



There is a department of college athletics, which 
though of a great deal of interest and amusement has 
in some manner or another been greatly neglected. 
We refer to the cross country runs. In the fall of the 
year nothing could be devised which would be better 
suited for keeping athletes in condition than good 
vigorous cross country running. Of late years these 
events have come more into prominence. Situated 
as we are in the beautiful valley of the Connecticut 
we have an opportunity which we would do well to 
avail ourselves of. Long distance runners who are 
looking forward to track team honors next spring 
shouldby all means institute a general movement for 
a series of cross country runs during the next few 
weeks. The movement once on foot, the general 
favor would follow and the sport would at once become 
popular. For those men who from lack of inclination 
or from constitutional weakness are unable to under- 
take the severer exercises we would recommend 
walks as a pleasurable and profitable means of be- 
coming acquainted with the numerous points of inter- 
est in our immediate vicinity. 



AGGIE A L UMNI A THLE TIC A SSOCIA TION. 
The allusions to the promised athletic field which 
have from time to' time appeared in one or another of 
the students' publications show that it is not forgotten 
that a movement was inaugurated a few years since 
which had for its object tho acquisition of a field for 
athletic purposes for the use of Aggie students. These 
allusions make it manifest too, that the interest of 
Aggie undergraduates in the project is as lively and 
earnest as ever. With rare exceptions such refer- 
ences to the matter as have appeared have been 
in good taste and have shown an admirable spirit. 



In a few instances impatience for tangible results 
has been displayed — rarely to a degree which 
has led to the inference that it was believed that the 
cause had been deserted by its friends or at the least 
that its friends had become lukewarm. To show that 
such is not the case and to make such a statement of 
the facts as shall enable all Aggie alumni and students 
who may read these lines fully to understand past and 
present plans as well as the reasons for such steps as 
have been taken are the objects of this article. 

The writer, no doubt in common with many others, 
has long believed that one of the great athletic needs 
of the College is an enclosed athletic field. It oc- 
curred to him in December, 1892, that it might be 
possible to utilize for that purpose a portion of the 
college estate and 'accordingly he sent to the Trustees 
of the College a letter from which the following lines 
are taken : — '• I respectfully ask you to appropriate to 
the use of the students of this college so much of the 
land (not to exceed five acres) belonging to the college 
and lying on the south side of the highway leading 
through the college estate from Amherst to Plainville, 
in the town of Hadley, as may be needed for a field 
for athletic sports. It is my wish that permission be 
granted to improve for athletic purposes by clearing 
and drainage, and to enclose by means of suitable 
fences so much of the land (not to exceed, as stated 
above, five acres) as may be hereafter agreed upon. 
I desire further, that permission be granted to erect a 
grand stand and any other structures appropriate to 
the uses to which the land is to be put. 

It is not expected nor desired that any part of the 
necessary expenses shall be borne by the college. An 
attempt will be made to provide for the improvement 
of the grounds by means of private subscriptions from 
the alumni ; and unless means sufficient to make the 
grounds an ornament to the Institution be forthcom- 
ing the attempt will be abandoned." 

This petition was very cheerfully granted by the 
board of trustees at their annual meeting in January, 
1893. Upon receiving notice that the petition had 
been granted, a letter appealing to past students was 
prepared and manifolded, and a copy of this letter, 
with which was enclosed a printed copy of the letter 
to the trustees from which I have quoted, was mailed 
to every graduate of the college. The responses re- 
ceived were quite as numerons and as fruitful in 



AGGIE LIFE. 



15 



pledges of assistance as had been expected. No less 
than seven hundred dollars was pledged without a sin- 
gle special appeal. 

Meanwhile the lot of land of which the permission to 
use had been granted was being cleared (it had been 
densely wooded), and as it was thus brought more 
clearly under view the difficulties of bringing it into 
suitable condition for the uses proposed became more 
obvious. 

It seemed, therefore, in view of the encouraging 
nature of the responses to the appeal for subscriptions 
that it would be wise to make the attempt to raise 
money enough to purchase and fit up a field better 
located and offering fewer natural obstacles th^n the 
one originally in view. 

Then came the panic of the fall of 1893 and the 
ensuing hard times. The payment of the sums 
pledged had not been called for and but very few dol- 
lars had been paid in previous to the panic. It was 
not deemed wise to press for payments nor to solicit 
further subscriptions during the continuance of the 
great business depression. It was felt that if sub- 
scriptions should be asked and refused during this 
period, the chance of ultimate success would be 
thereby lessened. Accordingly the matter was al- 
lowed to rest ; but it was not forgotten. 

In connection with the project for the purchase of 
land for the field, it was seen that In order to hold the 
same and to do business in a legal manner it was 
desirable to form a corporation. This was first sug- 
gested and favorably discussed in the alumni meeting 
at Amherst in June, 1895 ; but the plans in view were 
not realized until August, 1896. William C. Parker, 
'80 with his accustomed public spirit prepared the 
necessary legal papers and attended to most of the 
troublesome details of the business. The first meet- 
ing was held in the office of Charles L. Flint, '81 in 
Boston, the necessary formalities were carried out 
and the " Aggie Alumni Athletic Association " was 
incorporated under the statute laws of Massachusetts. 

The writer was elected — against his honest protest 
— the first president ; E. R. Flint, '87 was made clerk 
and C. R. Flint '81 was chosen treasurer. The cor- 
poration elected also a board of directors and adopted 
by-laws. It made every past student of the college 
who should pay a fee of five dollars a member of the 
Corporation. 



Matters were now so organized that when the time 
should seem propitious we should be in condition to go 
forward ; but though signs of business revival were 
then '' in the air," it was not deemed best to press for 
subscriptions at once. The times are now distinctly 
better, and business appears to be rapidly improving. 
It is probable that an earnest appeal for assistance 
will soon be put forth. The students at " Old Aggie " 
need and must have an athletic field. Let every past 
student contribute according to his abilities and before 
the close of the century their long cherished wish 
can be realized. 

Wm. p. Brooks. 



HIS DREAM. 

I had taken my horse to a blacksmith's shop in a 
small town situated in the northwestern part of Ver- 
mont and was waiting for the blacksmith to put on a 
shoe, when a young fellow about twenty years old 
came in with a gray mare. As is the custom with 
men, when time hangs heavily upon their hands, we 
entered into conversation. In the course of a few 
minutes we had branched into a rather warm discus- 
sion concerning the probabilities and improbabilities of 
a future war with England. We had not proceeded 
far, when the new arrival suddenly broke out with : 

" This arguing makes me tired. We shall all know 
soon enough, if ever a war breaks out. It seems all 
nonsense to me to .alk about it. I've got something 
more interesting. Say, sir," addressing me, " Do you 
believe in dreams ? " 

At first I v/as somewhat puzzled at so sudden a 
diversion and I hardly knew what to reply. " Dreams ? " 
said I, " What do you mean ? " 

" I mean, do you believe that there is anything in 
dreams ? For instance — Suppose now, I should have 
a certain dream, would you believe that it might come 
true ? " 

" I don't think I do believe in them, or at least, I 
never have believed in them. What made you ask 
me that, " I questioned. 

" Oh, not much," answered he, and almost in the 
seme breath continued, " I know you'll laugh at what 
I tell you, nevertheless, it is every whit true. Now 
remember, after I had the dream, I didn't think of it 



i6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



or attach anything to it ; but since what has happened 
to-day it all came back to me." 

" While 1 was out hunting this morning in the 
woods about five miles from here, 1 happened to come 
across an old tree on which were some marks. I 
studied them carefully and made out the letters ' W. 
F. C and an arrow with the number twenty before it 
pointing east, thus ; " and he traced the sign in the 
soot upon the window-pane. " I looked at them for a 
long time, wondering what they could mean. It 
occurred to me, that if I walked twenty paces in the 
direction the arrow pointed, I would find out what it 
meant. I did so ; and came upon another tree 
marked with the figure twenty-three instead of twenty, 
and the arrow pointing northeast. I followed the new 
direction and found myself face to face with a large 
smooth rock. I examined the place, and, after dig- 
ging up a good deal of old leaves and brushwood, I 
discovered a large flat stone, which looked like the 
top to some old well. I lifted the slab off and saw a 
good-sized hole, but there was no water in it. I struck 
a few matches, and looked down into the hole, but all 
I could see was, that it extended some distance back 
towards the face of the rock. My curiosity was now 
well aroused so I descended into the hole, struck 
another match and peered into the darkness. What 
I saw so frightened me that I had hardly strength 
enough to clamber out. I saw a face." 

" Oh, come, come now, don't joke with us," said I. 

'' No, I'm not joking. It is the truth. I ran away 
about a hundred feet ; but, as I heard no noise, I 
cautiously approached the hole again. This time I 
lit a pine knot and threw it into the hole so as to get 
more light. Now, I saw that, which I took for a 
human face to be a painting of some sort upon a 
door. What is behind that door I cannot say for I 
dared not try to find out." 

" That's a mighty queer thing," said the black- 
smith ; " but what has that to do with your dream ? " 

" Oh, I forgot. My dream was of a dark hole, and 
a hideous face, which seemed to retreat before me, 
leading me into a deep cavern. I could not control 
my m.otions ; I was pushed off into the cave. I 
tried to holler ; but I could make only a hoarse whis- 
per. Then all of a sudden there appeared before me 
a beautiful girl who seemed to be very sad. She came 
toward me, putting her finger at the same time over 



her lips, and pointing with the other hand toward a 
dark passage back of her. She motioned for me to 
follow her which I did, and she led me through the 
dark way, where I could touch the damp, rock walls 
on each side, to another cave beyond. She stopped 
in the middle of the room and looked cautiously 
around as if to make sure there was no one else 
around ; and then, having assured herself that we 
were alone, she walked to the massive wall on one 
side and took from a crevice a small tin box, from 
which she took a piece of paper. 

" Here my dream ended. From the day following 
this dream, till the time I saw that painted face, it has 
not entered my head. Now," concluded he, "a 
part of my dream has come true. I wonder if the 
rest will." 

Nine o'clock the next morning found the boy and 
myself riding in the direction of the " hole " as he 
termed it, which we reached after an hour's journey. 
Having arrived at the place he took from a bag which 
he carried, a few tools and a dark lantern. 

" We may need these," he observed. 

" No doubt," said I. 

" Here is the tree nearest the hole, and there is 
the rock. Come." 

We went to the place, lifted off the stone cover 
and looked in. When he lowered the lantern and I 
saw that painted face, I had one of the queerest sen- 
sations pass over me that I ever experienced. Had I 
not known that it was a painted face I would have 
been only too willing to believe it belonged to a person. 
The young fellow then dropped into the hole and en- 
joined me to follow. I did so and we both went to 
the door, which creaked upon its rusty hinges in 
answer to his push. What we next saw corresponded 
exactly with the boy's description. A sad, but very 
beautiful girl appeared and putting her fingers over 
her lips motioned us to follow. I was surprised to 
see how everything coincided with the facts of his 
dream. He, himself, was so excited that I thought 
he would drop the lantern. Suddenly he staggered 
and fell. I caught him just in time and thoughtlessly 
called to the girl to stop. Instantly the charm was 
broken. I looked up and down the corridor in vain 
for our fair guide ; she had mysteriously disappeared 
at my first interruption. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



17 



After the young man had recovered froai his faint- 
ing spell we continued our search ; but we were unable 
to solve the mystery of the dream. We found the tin 
box, indeed, but it was empty, and we were never 
able to conjecture what might have been written on 
the paper which the young girl had taken from the 
box in the dream. 



SOME NEW ARABIAN NIGHTS. 

During the early part of winter of 1 89-, I was 
driving through the hilly reigon west of the Assabet 
valley ; the snow had fallen steadily for the last two 
days and the strong wind had blown up huge drifts 
through which my horse floundered. I had intended 
to put up for the night at a small town where I could 
get good accomodation for both man and beast, but 
by some unlucky chance I had taken a wrong road 
and soon the darkness completely bewildered me so 
that I became lost. 

After some hours of fruitless search for the best 
road, I determined to give my horse his head, letting 
him go as he pleased, and, as his natural inclination 
was to jog along the narrow road through the woods, I 
allowed him to move along with a loose rein. It was, 
perhaps, some few minutes that we went along in this 
uncertain manner through the darkness, when the light 
of an isolated building came into view. At the sight 
of this evidence of civilization, my horse gave an 
impatient neigh and shuffled off at a much quicker 
gait. 

Within a short space of timie we arrived before what 
looked to be a sort of tavern, and a turn in the road 
brought us into the very yard, so that there was no 
escaping the attractions of a pleasant fire and a warm 
bed, which the house evidently possessed. 

The noise of our approach must have been quickly 
perceived from within, as I had no sooner descended 
from the sleigh than the large front door swung open 
and the burly form of one, whom I took to be the 
landlord, came into the blinding light. My wants 
made known, I was hurried into the large hall and my 
horse placed under the care of a very small stable boy. 
As soon as the heavy door closed, shutting out the cold 
night air, I perceived the softness of a violin which 
which was evidently being played in some adjoining 
room ; the noise of the storm had been so great that 



it had completely drowned the tones when I was out- 
side. 

The hall wherein I stood was long and rather 
narrow, with wainscoating half way up the walls ; while 
antlers and mooseheads decorated the bare 
spaces. The only light in the hall was from several 
small candles placed in a sconce upon the end wall. 
At regular intervals on either side, opened doors into 
what seemed to be small side rooms. Into one of 
these the landlord led me where I warmed myself and 
ate a very excellent meal that was served up for me 
by a buxom maid. 

After I had finished, I lighted the only dry cigar 
that I possesed and adjourned to the room from which 
I heard the music. This room formed a sort of 
gathering place for those travellers who might be be- 
lated and obliged to put up at the house. There was 
a large open fire place let into one side, where huge 
logs crackled and sputtered upon grim black firedogs ; 
above this was a mantle upon which set a profusion of 
stone mugs and church-warden pipes. A large salmon 
slept quietly in its glass case, wearied by the stories 
told about its capture and its weight. Fumes of 
tobacco hung silent in the heavy atmosphere and 
clouded the few pictures that relieved the walls of 
their bareness. 

As I entered, the musician ceased his playing and 
beckoned me to a seat beside him. Nothing loathe, 
I stretched myself and listened to the refrain that the 
artist had resumed after my interruption. The violin- 
ist was a peculiar man ; very short and nervous, yet 
when he was in the midst of a theme his face would 
assume an occupied look and he would sway to and 
fro influenced by the selection which he happened to 
be playing. His eyes would close and the movements 
of his body would be in perfect unison with the rythm 
of his piece. Since that night I came to know the 
artist well, and I can truthfully say that I never heard 
him play the same piece twice alike, so influenced 
would his playing be by whatever mood happened to 
possess him. 

The rest of the gathering formed a certain dim 
background to the virtuoso and it was not until much 
later that I could form a clear perception of those who 
formed this human accompaniment. Yet this back- 
ground was only less interesting than the principal, in 
that it was composed of members whose occupations 



i8 



AGGiE 



and interests were varied and at some variance v/ith 
my own inclinations and tastes. There was one with 
the unmistakable stamp of the merchant, a dealer in 
rugs, one could tell of writs and deeds, another of the 
Babylonian marks. The Assyrian scholar was there, 
discussing some erudite question with his neighbor 
from Armenia ; while the financier forgot his gains in 
admiration for the sweet cadences that filled the room. 

Amid all this uncertain environment, my host 
moved about at his ease, so completely oblivious to 
the unusual excellence of his surroundings, that I was 
forced to the conclusion that he had become accus- 
tomed to it and that I was the foreign element, the 
chance visitor. It was then that I began to bless the 
luck that brought me to the house, and to feel at a 
more perfect ease than I could at any of the more 
frequented taverns. As I was thus felicitating myself, 
the music stopped and my host crossed to where I sat. 
Stopping in front of me, he bowed politely and said, 
with an old style grace of expression that was very 
charming : 

" Sir ; we have not had the pleasure of your 
accquaintaince for long, yet I may say, both for myself 
and for my friends who are gathered here, you are 
most welcome. Your reputation, sir, has travelled 
much faster than you, yet, believe me, you would be 
as welcome if you had left that reputation behind. As 
it is, we gentlemen congratulate ourselves upon receiv- 
ing in our midst, one who combines so many excellent 
traits as yourself. It is our custom to beguile the 
long hours of a winter's evening with such entertain- 
ment as may please those present, to-night we have 
already had music and art, for which you have unfor- 
nately arrived somewhat late, but we trust that you 
will favor us with your presence for a longer space of 
time than one short evening, thus you may be able to 
become the better acquainted with those now present. 
As a new-comer, sir, it is customary for us to ask the 
favor of some slight entertainment on your part, and 
if I may be so bold as to suggest that which would be 
agreeable to both myself and my companions, I 
would ask a story from you. We have had many 
stories told here and will, undoubtedly have many 
more related, but our night's entertainment would be 
decidedly incomplete without at least a short tale from 
one whose reputation as the prince of story tellers is 
not to gainsaid." 



After the applause which followed this quaint speech 
had somewhat subsided, I thanked my host for his 
kind words and assured him that it would be a great 
pleasure for me to contribute my share towards the 
evening's entertainment. So, drawing our chairs 
more closely about the warm fire, lighting our pipes 
afresh, I began with, 

THE FATE OF GRIMSBY. 

F. A. M. 
(to be continued.) 



FOOTBALL SCORES. 

Oct. 9. Harvard 13, Dartmouth 0. 

Yale 32, Williams 0. 

Princeton 28, U. S. N. A. 0. 

U. of P. 58, Lehigh 0. 

Brown 44, B. U. 0. 

Trinity 26, M. A. C. 5. 

Amherst 6, Holy Cross 6, 

Cornell 15, Tufts 0. 

West Point 12, Wesleyan 9. 

Bates 8, U. of Maine 6. 

Colby 4, B. A. A. 0. 

New Hampshire College 22, Tilton 0. 
Oct. 13. Harvard 38, Amherst 0. 

Princeton 34, Penn. State College 0. 

U. of P. 42, Virginia 0. 

Wesleyan 16, Tufts 0. 

Brown 20, Andover 4. 

Bowdoin 10, Exeter 0. 



FOOTBALL. 
Wesleyan, 18; M. A. C, 5. 

On the afternoon of Oct. 6 M. A. C. was defeated 
by Wesleyan 18 to 5. Although the Aggie players 
were greatly outweighed they succeeded in holding 
their opponents for four different downs. 

Wesleyan made four touchdowns two of which were 
obtained on flukes. 

M. A. C. opened the game by a series of short 
rushes through the tackles and the guards. Otis and 
Crowell got at the opponent's line, and were making 
steady gains until Bibber obtained the ball on a fluke 
and scored a touch down. 

On the kick-off Rymer caught the ball and was 
downed in his tracks. At this stage of the game 
Aggie braced up and held Wesleyan for four downs. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



19 



The ball was then passed to Halligan who suc- 
ceeded in kicking a goal from the field. 

For Wesleyan all of the backs played a snappy game, 
and for Aggie Eaton excelled. The line up : 
Wesleyan. M. A. C. 

A. Young, 1. e. 1. e Turner 

Yale, Wright, 1. t. 1. t. Beaman 

Bibber, Btown, 1. g. 1. g. Stanley 

Bartlett, Sibley, c. • c. Parmenter 

Townsend, r. g. r. g. Cooke 

Williams, r. t. r. t. Eaton 

Young, Camp, r. e. r. e. Halligan 

Davidson, Harris, q. b. q. b. Canto 

Rymer, Sargent, r. h. r. h. Crowell 

Bane, Yarrow, 1. h. 1. h. Otis, Rogers 

Dodds, f. b. f. b. Gile 

Umpire — A. B. Thomas. Referee — R. D. Warden, Aggie 
•98. 

Trinity, 26; M. A. C, 5; 

Owing to the hard game and the several mishaps 
which we encountered with the Wesleyan team last 
Wednesday, we were compelled to send a crippled 
team to play the strong Trinity eleven. Trinity took 
advantage of this and put in their best men in order to 
run up a larger score than did the Wesleyan team on 
the previous Wednesday. 

At the opening of the game Lord kicked off for 
Trinity to the 35 yard line. The Aggies secured the 
ball but soon lost it to Trinity, who rushed for repeated 
gains through the guards and the tackles, until Bel- 
lamy was forced over the line for a touchdown, Ingalls 
failed to kick a goal. 

On the kick-off Halligan secured the ball, and M. 
A. C. carried the ball to the 25 yard line, from which 
Halligan kicked a goal from the field. 

In the second half Aggie took a brace and the 
Trinity players were only able to make one touch. 
down. 

For Aggie, Gile, Canto, and Halligan played well 
while for Trinity, Johnson, Capt. Woodle and Bellamy 
excelled. The summary: 

Trinity. M. A. C. 

Ellis, 1. e. 
Ingalls, 1. t. 
Bacon, 1. g. 
Ford, c. 
Johnson, r. g. 



^otes and ^omm^nts. 



r. e. Halligan 

r. t. Turner 

r. g. Cooke 

c. Parmenter 

1. g. Stanley 



Blakeslee, r. g. 1. t. Beaman 

Brown, r. e. 1. e. Walker 

Sturtevant, q. b. q. b. Dorman 

Woodle, 1. h. b. r. h. b. Crowell 

Bellamy, r. h. b. 1. h. b. Baker 

Arundell, f. b. f. b. Gile 

Umpire — Howard, Aggie '93. Referee — Lake, Harvard 
'92. Lnesmen — Gamwell, Amherst, and Graves, Trinity. 



One year ago, soon after Lieut. Wright took com- 
mand of the military department, orders were given 
for a fire drill. This resulted in a vain attempt to 
throw a stream to the height of the upper windows in 
South College, while everyone within twenty-five feet 
of the hose was drenched by the fine streams which 
spurted from the old hose as if it were so much 
canvass. This poor condition of our fire apparatus 
set those who had these things in charge to thinking 
and since that time the fire equipment has been 
thoroughly renovated. When the reservoir was con- 
structed on Clark Hill, the water mains to all the 
college buildings were relaid with eight inch pipe ; 
thus giving a great increase in water power. The 
old hose was discarded as useless and an ample sup- 
ply of new hose was purchased. Many minor things 
as lanterns, axes, etc., have been added. This fall 
the fire department has been put on a firm business- 
like basis by the new equipment and the assignment 
of the cadets to particular duties. The good result of 
these improvements is evident to all as at the fire 
drill October 12 it was found that a stream can now 
be easily thrown over the highest point of the Drill 

Hall. 

* * 
* 

One of those blessings which is little thought of 
till it is irretrievably lost or at least greatly injured is 
good eyesight. Those who study or read to any great 
extent by artificial light find great difficulty even with 
the greatest care in preserving their eyesight unin- 
jured through a college course. Hence it becomes 
of first importance that the lights be kept up to stand- 
ard. Considerable comment has been caused among 
the students here by the lessening of the current by 
the electric light company. Up to within a short 
time the lights have been entirely satisfactory ; but 
recently they have been so dim as to be very trying 
to the eyes of the students. We trust that some- 
thing will soon be done to remedy this matter. 

* * 

Unusual efforts have been made this year to give 
Aggie a winning football team. Good coaching has 
greatly strengthened the team, but it seems at times 



20 



AGGIE LIFE. 



almost a waste of money to have a coach and rubber 
on the field when the captain can hardly get an eleven 
to come out. Coaching is useless unless the team is 
on hand to profit by it. Wake up fellows and show 
your loyalty 1 Remember that nearly every game 
thus far has seen with a large strong college and the 
scores made by them have not been large. There is 
good reason for encouragement. A little hard luck 
in the line of injuries only emphasizes the necessity 
for more men to come out to practice so that we may 
have good substitutes ready to step into the game in 
case of emergency. The heaviest part of the sched- 
ule has now been played and now we must go into 
the remaining games feeling that we have an even 
chance of winning and win we will. So come out 
every day fellows and do credit to Aggie ! 



" In time of Peace, prepare for War." Everyone 
was encouraged and gratified when we won the ath- 
letic meet from Storrs last spring. As it is very 
likely that M. A. C. will have an athletic meet next 
year with not only Storrs but all the New England 
State Colleges, it seems only right that a word con- 
cerning it should be spoken. In order to win, and win 
we must, the men must practice and train. There 
are many men in college who think they know nothing 
about athletics, but with a couple of terms practice 
they would do wonders. We must work harder this 
year than we did last. Although we have no very 
good facilities for indoor work, yet we should make 
the most of what we have. A few indoor meets 
would start a spirit of rivalry among the classes and 
would prepare the men for the training of the spring 
term. Every man who is at all interested in athletics 
and who is able should try for the track team. There 
is no better way to do this than starting early to train. 
Good training for the first two terms will make the 
way easy when the track team is selected in the 
spring. 

* * 

The fact that there is no literary society here which 
is open to all members of the college has often been 
commented upon. There was at one time such a 
society but it has died out. Now why not try once 



more and see if we can not have a flourishing literary 
society ? Delegates from Storrs have talked about 
having a debate between the two colleges. Why 
should not the College have a debating society ? 
Once started in good shape, we feel sure it would 
flourish and be supported by the students. 



Rev. Calvin Stebbins of Worcester has kindly con- 
sented to deliver a course of three lectures before 
the college this term. He takes for his different sub- 
jects : The Puritan Poet, John Milton, his life and 
works ; John Milton and the Puritan Epic, Paradise 
Lost; The Character of Milton's Satan. Dr. Stebbins 
is well known here and having studied carefully the 
works of Milton he is a thorough master of his sub- 
jects. The dates for the lectures have not been 
definitely arranged but they will be held on convenient 
evenings in the near future. The lectures will be 
both entertaining and instructive, and no one should 
miss this opportunity of hearing, from the lips of one 
who is authority, of the life and thought of the " blind 
poet." 



CoUc^? Not?$ 



— One, two, three, drop ! 

— All up together boys. Heave ! 

- — Otis, 1901, has joined the D. G. K. society. 

— The Senior division in Botany is working on 
Bacteria. 

— The College choir is organized and in a fair way 
to success. 

— The Seniors are having instruction in Helio- 
graph signalling. 

— Quite a number of " the boys " attended the 
Belchertown fair. 

H. L. Crane, '00, and A. C. Monahan, '00, spent a 
few days at their respective homes. 

— C. E. Risley, 1900, has returned to College and 
will resume his studies with his class. 

— There were no services in the chapel Sunday, 
Oct. 3rd, as Dr. Walker was sick with a cold. 

■ — On Monday evening, Oct. 4th, a large party of 
students went to see the play " A World of Fun." 



AGGIE LIFE. 



21 



— Sunday afternoon Oct. 10th, Prof. Mills spoke 
before the College Young Men's Christian Association. 

— The chevrons for the Senior officers have arrived. 
They are gold braid on white background, and give a 
pleasing effect on the blue blouse. 

— In the list of 1900 class officers published in our 
last issue there were two errors. Class historian should 
be A. F. Frost, and Sergeant-at-Arms, H. E. Walker. 

— At a recent meeting of the Senior class a very 
satisfactory report was heard from the Cane Com- 
mittee. C. G. Clark and S. W. Wiley were elected 
to the Photograph Committee. 

— Delegates chosen by the Y. M. C. A. to attend 
the annual State Conference to be held in Worcester 
the latter part of this month, are W, S. Fisher, '98 ; 
W. E. Hinds, '99; and H. Baker, 1900. 

— It is getting to be a serious affair when a Fresh- 
man takes from a 1900 man a piece of rope won in a 
■ormer rope pull. The serious part of it is allowing 
the Freshman to go unpunished. At times our 
Sophomores are slow. 

— On October 5th the freshmen appeared on drill 
in their new military suits. Tailor Blodgett of Ever- 
3tt, formerly of Amherst, had the contract to supply 
the uniforms, and he has given general satisfaction, 
both in fit and workmanship. 

— On October 6th our football team was defeated 
by Wesleyan's eleven at Middletown by the score of 
18-5. Wesleyan set a fast pace during the first half 
but could not tear up Aggie's line to block Halligan's 
beautiful goal from the field. 

— The Senior division in Horticulture and Agricult- 
ure went to the Northampton Agricultural fair with 
Professors Maynard and Cooley to see the exhibits of 
fruit and stock. Prof. Maynard judged the fruit, 
assisted by the Senior Horticulturists. 

— Rev. Calvin Stebbins of Worcester, who preached 
the baccalaureate sermon here last June, is going to 
deliver three lectures on the " Life and Works of 
Milton." Unless the present dates are changed these 
lectures will be given in the chapel on the first three 
Friday evenings of November. 

— A new 'fire order has been published and dis- 
tributed. Monday, Oct. 1 1 , the battalion had a fire 
drill to accustom the men to their duties. Five hun- 



dred feet of new hose has been purchased for the hose 
cart, together with spanners, axes, lanterns, etc. The 
water-pressure is as good as an engine. 

— Trinity team was by far too strong for our crip- 
pled eleven, which had not recovered from the effects 
of the Wesleyan game. Serious injuries and absence 
of some of our players made it necessary to put in 
substitutes. With the regular " Aggie " team such 
as lined up against Wesleyan the score would 
undoubtedly have been closer. 

— The class of 1 900 enjoyed a very pleasant 
Mountain-Day last Wednesday, visiting Mt. Holyoke 
with Dr. Stone. While the Sophs, were enjoying 
themselves near Holyoke, or near Belchertown, the 
Freshmen stole a march on them, and grouping them- 
selves together on the east side of the chapel, enjoyed 
for a few moments the kindly stare of Mr. Lovell's 
camera. 

— On October 9th Amherst and Holy Cross played 
a tie game on Pratt Field. Loose playing character- 
ized both teams, the ball constantly changing hands on 
fumbles. Holy Cross scored in the first half. In the 
second half Amherst took a brace. She secured the 
ball on the kickoff and kept making steady gains till 
she scored. Time was called shortly after with the 
ball near the centre of the field. 

— It is rather a peculiar characteristic of human 
nature that when one gets up early in the morning one 
thinks that others should do the same. Though prob- 
ably this is not the feeling of the boys who work at 
the barn, yet it remains a fact that they are just as 
liable to waken others by their calling, as the one whom 
they intend to. Would it not be better if they did not 
disturb our morning slumbers ? 

— The members of the Senior class have elected 
the following officers for the ensuing term : Pres't, 
Charles Newcomb Baxter, Quincy; vice-pres't, Ave- 
dis Garabet Adjemian, Harpoot, Asia Minor, Turkey ; 
sec'y and treas., Clifford Gay Clark, Sunderland; 
class cane com., Alexander Montgomery, Jr., Natick, 
and Julian Stiles Eaton, New York city ; historian, 
Alexander Montgomery, Jr., Natick ; class captain, 
Avedis Garabet Adjemian ; reading-room directors, 
Julian S. Eaton, George Henrj' Wright ; flower bed 
committee, Alexander Montgomery, Jr., Clifford Gay 
Clark, George Henry Wright ; leader of the cheering, 
John Peter Nickerson. 



22 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— After the rope pull last Friday afternoon the 
Juniors and Freshmen had a practice game of foot 
ball, the Juniors winning, 4-2. It v/as a characteris- 
tic Freshman game, full of fun for the side lines. The 
Juniors succeeded in picking up the ball on a fumble 
and making a touchdown. In the second half the 
Freshmen forced the Juniors to make a safety. 
Everybody was surprised at the snappy play of the 
Freshmen, and we may see a good close game 
between the Freshies and Sophs, if they decide to 
play. 

One of the pretty features of the foot ball team's 

work is the drop kicking by Halligan. In two games 
this has enabled our eleven to score when they could 
not gain the required distance by rushing the ball. 
Eaton's punting is commendable and v/e like to see 
it, as it tends to make the game more open, besides 
it rests the half-backs. It is hard work for a half- 
back to keep striking the line, and it soon wears him 
out so that he is unable to play a strong defensive 
game when the opposing team has the ball. We are 
proud of the work our team has done thus far, and we 
will endeavor to show our appreciation by giving it 
strong financial support. 

— The annual rope-pull of the two lower classes 
came off last Friday afternoon, before an enthusiastic 
crowd of spectators. The Freshman team was con- 
siderably lighter than the Sophs, and did not under- 
stand their business. The Sophomores pulled together 
and at the end of the two minutes only seven feet of 
rope remained on the Freshmen's side of the stake. 

The two teams were as follows : 
1900 1901 

Stanley, (Capt.) Barry 

Crowell, (Capt.) Cooke 

Gile, Graves 

Parmenter, Wilson 

Atkins, Boutelle 

H. Baker, Bridgeforth 

— One of the most practical and needed improve- 
ments which has come to our notice is the enlarge- 
ment of the Botanical laboratory. The floor-room 
has been nearly doubled by extending the north end of 
the building, and a new floor has been laid, which will 
not shake and jar the microscopes out of focus, if a 
person walks over it. Enough windows have been 
put in to insure a good working light. New double 



desks with convenient lockers for notebooks, micro- 
scopes, etc., have been put in for the use of the Sen- 
iors. On the east and west sides of the laboratory 
there are long tables, with lockers underneath for the 
instruments, where the Sophomores will have their 
microscopical work during the winter term. It is a 
happy change from the former close, cramped labo- 
ratory, to the present light airy roomy quarters. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Since the last number of the Aggie Life has been 
printed, the literature department of the College 
library has received a most valuable set of books enti- 
tled " Library of the World's Best Literature." The 
volumes are divided into alphabetical order the first 
one containing biographies of all celebrated poets 
whose names are included from A to APU with sev- 
eral writings which are characteristic of their works. 
At present we have only twenty of these books the 
last one ranging from Phi to Qui. 

The books are edited by Charles Dudley Warner 
and when this set is completed it will form a valuable 
library in itself, 

"Tobacco Leaf" is a title of a book edited by 
Kellebrew and Herbert Myrick of the class of '82. 
The preface contains photgoraphs of eminent men 
who have aided in the preparation of this book. The 
history of the " Tobacco Leaf " is also very interest- 
ing. The book treats of the uses of the weed, classi- 
fication and markets, raising seed, curing, etc. 

The following is a list of valuable books that have 
also come Into the library lately ; 

The World's Progress, by W. C. King ; Poetical . 
Works of John Milton ; Psychology of the Emotions, 
Th. Ribot; Mushroons and their Uses, C. H. Peck; 
Insect Life, J. H. Comstock; Principles of Fruit 
Growing, L. H. Bailey; Manual of Bacteriology, 
Muir and Ritchie ; The New Pyschology, E. W. 
Scripture ; Juvenile Offenders, by W. D. Morrison ; 
The Cell, its development and inheritance, E. B. Wil- 
son ; The Literary History of the American Revolu- 
tion, by Tyler ; American Literature during the 
Colonial Time (2 vols), by Tyler; Degeneration, Max 
Nordeau ; Chemistry of Dairying, Snyder. 



" That's a pretty smooth turn out Miss Jlmsonhas." 
" Yes, but it's not half so exciting as the way her 
old gent does it." — U. of M. Wrinkle. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



23 



E^^cKan^es- 


FORGETFULNESS. 
So poor a memory have I, 




SONNET. 


That when 1 chance to make a call. 


How little did we think that Cupid's dart 
To such a lofty target could aspire, 


Cane, rubbers, handkerchief and gloves — 
I seldom come away with them all. 


Or even that the Muse with gifted lyre 




Could tempt thee from thy lonely ways to part. 


To-night, this sad forgetfulness 


Ah Prex ! sly old deceiver as thou art ! 


Has made me play a pretty part : 


Thy soul has not yet lost that hidden fire, 


1 called on Miss Penlope, 


That fanned by love's old song grows ever higher, 


And now I find I've left my heart! 


Until at last it melts e'en to the heart. 


— The Brunonian. 


Then, Prex, remember when perhance your boys 




With some fair maid have whiled the e'en away, 




And wake not with the sun at break of day 


AmheFst Fmlt Store, 


To help partake with thee of chapel joys. 


Remember, acts much more than words can teach ; 


'Tis always best to practice what you preach. — Ex. 


PALMER'S BLOCK. 


How dear to our heart 

Is cash on subscription 
When the generous subscriber 


ALL KINDS OF FRUIT CONFECTIONERY, 
AND CIGARS AT LOWEST 


Presents' it to view ; 


PRICES. 


But the man who won't pay 




We refrain from description ; 
For perhaps, gentle reader, 


g^^GOODS DELIVERED FREE..c.:^ 


That man might be you. — Ex. 


L. MELIiEN, Manager. 






mi 



im 



A STUDENT'S MOUNT. | 

You will be interested in the new Stearns year book. Among other | 

things it gives full details of the wonderful new chainless Yellow Fellow. j 

The STEARNS roR'98\ 

Prices will be considerably j 

lower than previously \ 

but the quality remains | 

unexcelled. j 

" All Yellow wheels are either Stearns bicyles or imitations." | 

Write now for agent's terms. I 

E". C. STEARNS <& OO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. \ 



24 



AGGIE LIFE. 




(ilatehmakeF and Optician. 

Projnpi skillful attention given to all fine 
and complicated watchivork. 

A. B. CALL, 

273 Hain St., 






8@=-BEST MEALS SERVED IN NORTilAMPTON^,^ 



GIVE US A CALL. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCiETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student ti'ade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Hooks, larccst and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALU. 



Over 4,000 vacancies. Faithful service guaranteed. Kook 
with free plans, 10 cents. Blanks free. Address, 

Southern Teachers' Bureau, Louisoille, Kg. 

60 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE. 




TRADE MARKS* 
DESIGNS, 
COPYRIGHTS &o. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain, free, whether an invention ig 
probably patentable. Communlcationa Btrictly 
coofldential. Oldest agency for securing patents 
in America. We have a Washington oflBce. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the 

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, 

beautifully illustrated, largest circulation of 
any scientific journal, weekly, terms $3.00 a year; 
$1.50 six mouths. Specimen copies and Hand 
Book on Patents sent free. Address 

MUNN & CO., 
361 Broadwav. New York< 









m 



n 





4 

CD 



Bicyeles 

The Hartford Sin- 
gle-Tube Tires with 
which Columbia 
Bicycles are fitted 
are the standard 
tires. None equal 
them in comfort, 
durability, or ease 
of repair. 

The Colatnbia Art Catalogtte is free 
if you call. 




5 
> 



AGGIE LIFE. 



SPECIAL DRIVE. 




96 KEATING BICYCLES 



SEE i?ia:..^T o"cr::RT7-E. 




AGENT. 



PHOTOGRAPHIG STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 

A., J. ®OH[irviL<A.i«je, 

108 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



OOA.Iv. 



THOMAS C. DILLON, 



-OOA.lv. 



-DEALER IN- 



HARD AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Oi'ders by mall will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 




S-^1. 



^^•^ 



^—l 



OF WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS. 
Work Guaranteed or money refunded. Give us a trial. 



102 Main St., opp. Court House, 
NOETHAMPTON, MASS. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



The Photographer^ 

To tlie class of '97 M. A. C. MAKES A SPECIALTY 
OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



E, K. BENNETT 

Jeweler, 
Optician, 
Watchmakei . 



FIRST DOOR FROM POST OFFICE. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED 



AGGiK JLIFE. 



C. S. GABIES, D. D. S. 

E. ]S^. BROWX, D. D. S. 



DEINTISTS. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether aud Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 



STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

EANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 



-ALSO 



STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 




(Dassaehasetts JlgpiealtiiPal College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Pgrclefon Horses and Soiitndoi Mi 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass, 




^OM 







AGGIE LI^'E. 



E. B. mCKINS 



I. B. 



V\^ 



rVILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours .- 

O TO 12 J^. 3VI., 1-30 TO 5 1=- Ts/L. 



Ether and Nirous Oxicle Gas administered wlien desired. 

G. M. CHAiBERLAiri 

Livery and Feed Stable, 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 



HOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

IRXJBBEZ^ O-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



J^-Jiepairing done tvhile you tcait,.SX 
2 PH(EN1X ROW. 



:BOi%.iCl>IIVG^ 



Livery, Feed and ExGhan|e Stable. 

Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



lhaa*'B Barn, 



Anifierst, Wass. 



M. N. SPEAR, 

6ool(sell8r, SMioiier anil Newsdealer. 

WALL, PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECaND-HAMD TBXT BOOKS BOUGHT ako SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

HEADQUA RTERS FOR AGGIE STUDENTS. 

MMJR BRESSIMO- ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONSO, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amiiekst House Annex, Amuekst, Mass. 



:E=:i3:..^2^3v£^^ciST. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night callo responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 






and Carpet Renovatioi Establisliment. 



A.ge;i^ .A-g^arxt, 



KT, -^"VIESEQ-HI" »©S 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Worli taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

SS^^ 5.^^^TISF.A.CTIO]Sr 0-XJ.A^K,.A.3SrTEE3I3, a^S^ 

Office : 

Next Dook West of Amity St. School House. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 

epy, feed and Boayding 



Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 16-4. 
CowLES Street, Aggies give us a trial. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



wwimsm'mm mmsm^ mm^mss^sm mmmmmmmm^mmisei ^ 



T 



rs 



,1 



TYPEWRITERS RENTED $3.00 PER MONTH. 

Rent allowed towards the purchase price. 



ia stock. When ordering SUPPLIES send us name and number of your TYPEWRITER. 

Send for latest cataloj>ue of 

NEW FRANKLIN TYPEWRITER, PRICE $75.00. 
CUTTEIR TOWER CO., 

12 A. Milk Street, BOSTON, MASS. 

Established 1845. Tel. 2423. 



AMHaST, Aa$$. 



CHARLES G. AYRES, 

SINGLE AND DOUBLE TEAMS 

i6®-At Keasonable Prices.^ssr 



A. J. BIORGAN, 

Practical Horseshoer, 

Bear of Purity Bakery, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

g^^Best of work guaranteed. ^^^ 



J. H. WEl^TZELL, 

No, 2 Cook's Block, 

first Class ]^m Cutting and Shaving. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBER'S SUPPLIES 
ALWAYS ON HAND. 

^«®»give: me: a -rRiAL.-sfir 



IV. ixr. BOirMTON, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



RIVBH STBEET, 



Northampton, Mass 



. E. 

Our store has been repaired and improved throughout, ar.d 
our stock of 

Furniture, Carpets, Draperies, Slades, etc, 

is all new. We solicit an inspection. 



25 and 27 Pleasant St., - Northampton, Mass. 



MASS.J\GRICULTOI[AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, i 

AMHERST, MASS. 1 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.08 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 



O. O. OOUOHC. 




VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST, MASS.. NOVEMBER 3, 1897 



NO. 3 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 

Terms $1.00 per year in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Randall D. Warden. '98, Editor-in-Chief. 

Alexander Montgomery, Jr., '98. Business Manager. 

Frederick H. Turner, '99, Ass't Business Manager. 
George H. Wright, '98. Willis S. Fisher, '98. 

Avedis G. Adjemian, '98. Warren E. Hinds, '99. 
William H. Armstrong, '99. Charles A. Crowell, Jr., '00. 
George F. Parmenter. '00. James E. HaUigan, '00. 



Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed to Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 

Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Athletic Association, 
Foot-Ball Association, 
Base-Ball Association. 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 
Ninety-Nine Index, 



W. S. Fisher, Pres. 

J. S. Eaton. Sec. 

R. D. Warden, Manager. 

J. R. Dutcher, Manager. 

J. P.Nickerson, Sec. 

J. S. Eaton, Manager. 

J. R. Du+cher, Manager. 



Sharp shooting at 400 yards 



Shall we have a match between rifle teams from 
Company " A " and Company " B." 



Next Saturday we shall have our first league game 
of the season. So far we have, possibly, not been 
quite so successful as we had led ourselves to believe 
we should be ; and yet, we have had a fair degree of 
of success in scoring upon some of the season's 
strong teams, as well as winning from New Hamp- 
shire. Our game next Saturday with Connecticut 
will be the deciding issue of whether we shall go to 
Maine to play the final and deciding game of the 



league, and it behooves every man in college during 
the next few days to m.anifest some interest in the 
work of the team. Come out upon the field, if not in 
a football suit, come prepared to encourage, not by crit- 
icism, but by loud and prolonged cheers, every rush of 
the team. Last Spring Connecticut was overwhelm- 
ingly defeated in the athletic games at Willimantic ; 
the thoughts of that victory are still fresh in our minds. 
Players, we expect no disappointment from the out- 
come of next Saturday's game. Rooters, walk up and 
pay your subscriptions. 



In the last edition of the Aggie Life it was reported 
that "The College Choir " was organized and was on 
a fair way to success. The college choir is not fully 
organized as yet, however, since several changes 
must be made to increase the volume on some of the 
parts which at present are drowned out by the others. 
The rehearsals are to come only once a week, and 
it will take some time before each member of the 
choir can feel confident of his part. We are sure 
there is room for improvement. However, not until 
we have some new hymn books can we do justice to 
ourselves. One of the pleasantest features of our 
song service is to have music so written that the 
entire congregation can sing and not leave it all to 
the choir ; and undoubtedly the chapel services would 
be made more effective could we only have some new 
hymn books, such as we should all be able to sing 
from. 



President Goodell has expressed a desire that 
the names of the Principals of the various High 
Schools throughout the state, be placed at his dis- 
posal, in order that he may open communication with 
them in regard to placing circulars in the hands of the 
graduating students. This is imperative in order that 
we may become more widely known. Most of the 



26 



AGGIE LIFE. 



colleges of Massachusetts are fed through the influ- 
ence of their numerous alumni, who hold positions, to 
a wider or less degree, as teachers throughout the 
state. This is not so in regard to our institution, as 
most of our men, either accept government positions 
in the lines of experimental work in the governmental 
experiment stations, or, enter the ranks of professional 
men. Since the laws of the state will not permit the 
names of the graduating students in the High Schools 
to be furnished to the officers of the College it becomes 
necessary to adopt other means of attaining our ends ; 
the above method seems to be on the whole the most 
satisfactory. The Life makes the request that each 
person who reads these lines shall forward, in its care, 
the names and address of the principal of the school 
from which he is a graduate. 



The following letter from Mr. Geo. D. Pratt has 
been received by Pres't H. H. Goodell and sent to us 
for publication. 

" Long Island City, October 16, 1897. 

H. H. GooDeLL, President, Massachusetts Agr'l 
College, Dear Sir : — Your letter of September 24th 
to Dr. Hitchcock has been referred to me. The 
Pratt Cottage will be very glad to welcome any of 
your sick students, provided the cottage is not filled 
with Amherst students. The price that will be 
charged the Agricultural students will be $1.50 each 
per day. Preference, of course, will always be given 
to the Amherst College students, as this is the Am- 
herst College Hospital ; but if any of your students are 
in need of care, we will be very glad to have them go 
to the Hospital, subject to the same rules and regu- 
lations that the Amherst students are under. 
Very truly yours, 
(Signed) George D. Pratt." 

A long felt want has been now supplied, and it is a 
great satisfaction to know that a place equipped with 
all the comforts of home has been provided, where 
our students can go and receive proper care and 
attention, Suitable acknowledgment has been made 
to Mr. Pratt, and the Life here publicly expresses its 
deep gratitude for the great kindness extended to our 
students. 



HENRY GEORGE. 



An honest man lies dead ! Amid the turmoil of a 
political campaign which has never been excelled for 



virulence of expression of personal abuse. Amid the 
nervous excitement or a canvass incident to an elec- 
tion of some moment. Death has stepped and removed 
one of the leading characters. Not a character of 
such influence that the Greater New York is likely to 
be deprived of its new mayor, but one who had en- 
tered the political arena as a factor in the great 
struggle for a pure government as against debased 
party control. 

Henry George, the idol of the laboring classes, lies 
dead in that metropolis to which he had given so much 
and from which he had received so little. Of rather 
slight physical build, this man felt called upon to lead 
a forlorn hope, to enter a battle wherein he had not 
the least chance of being victorious, and the strain of 
campaigning has proven too great for his weakened 
constitution. With heart and soul, Mr. George 
entered upon his task, and the earnestness of his 
speeches, the sincerity of his manner, had brought 
to his aid many who might otherwise have been arrayed 
against him. The last few days of this martyr's life, 
for there never was a truer martyr • upon this earth, 
when Death had invisibly set his seal upon this throb- 
bing brow, those days were ones of toil, marked almost 
with the despondency of despair : still the man never 
faltered but trod the path that led him to the darkened 
grave. 

Yet it is not as a politician that Henry George will 
be remembered ; it will be as our great commoner, a 
man of the people and always for the people. He 
will be remembered as the student and scholar, as the 
author and lecturer; and above and beyond all political 
cavil, he will be reverenced as a true and noble 
American ; an American whom we shall do well 
never to forget. 

We may not always agree with Mr. George in his 
doctrines or in their expediency, but we all have to 
acknowledge the man's integrity of character and his 
steadfastness of purpose. His honesty of conviction 
is above reproach, and we shall always revere his broad 
humanity and noble ideals. The common people loved 
and in him they placed their trust ; this he never 
abused : — of how many public men can we say the 
same ? Great in life, even greater in death : — -the 
laborer has lost his truest friend ; the scholar will 
miss his companion in books, and humanity must 
mourn the loss of a great benefactor. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



27 



An honest man lies dead, — 

Thus shall the epitaph be read 
By those who sorrow 'round his bier, 

Wreathed in a martyr's pall, 
A great man even in his fall, 

The workman's truest friend rests here. 
As centuries roll by. 

And knowledge with a fresher eye 
Shall probe the secrets of thy dream, 

Then may thy theories find 
Soil of a more congenial kind. 

Beside life's quickly moving stream. 

F. A. Merrill. 



THE JUNIOR TRIP. 

The first three days of last week were given to the 
Junior class in order to enable them to go to Boston 
on a chemical trip. Dr. Wellington accompanied the 
class and his efforts to make the trip enjoyable are 
fully appreciated. Arriving in Boston at 1 1-30 Mon- 
day morning, the first object of interest was the Food 
Fair, to this we all immediately repaired and there 
had dinner. We spent the afternoon in sampling 
different kinds of food stuffs and listening to a well 
rendered program by Sousa's band. Monday evening 
we scattered, many attending the theatre, some 
spending the evening outside the city. 

On Tuesday morning we all started for East Cam- 
bridge where we were to visit J. P. Squire's 
Packing House. When we arrived there after regis- 
tering, we started on a tour of the buildings which 
altogether covered some 27 or more acres. Every 
detail of the work was fully explained by assistants 
who out-did themselves in courtesy and politeness. 
One very interesting part of the establishment was the 
mammouth engine which was used to evaporate 
ammonia for the purpose of cooling their storerooms. 
The engineer who lectures at the Institute of Tech- 
nology kindly explained the processes which were 
undergone and made us thoroughly acquainted with 
the manner in which the work was done. 

After having spent the morning in going over the 
different departments we were very agreeably sur- 
prised to find ourselves conducted into an office, 
where were several large platters heaped with crackers 
and frankfurts, the latter of which we had seen 
made. At the suggestion of " Pitch in boys" we 
were not at all bashful and the provisions were 
speedily diminished. As we left the packing-house. 



we gave an unanimous vote that the J. P. Squire's 
Packing House was a pretty good sort of a place. 

We next visited Harvard College, more especially 
the Aggasiz Museum where we viewed with great 
interest the wonderful collection of glass flowers lately 
presented to the college. After remaining there for a 
few hours we visited The Union Glass Works which 
were very interesting. 

Eight o'clock Tuesday evening found the class 
gathered together at the Parker House, where we 
were most royally treated to a dinner by the class 
of 1901. 

Wednesday morning the Bradley fertilizer works 
and the Sulphuric acid works at Plymouth were visited. 
This concluded our program and taking the four 
o'clock train at Boston we arrived at Amherst Wed- 
nesday evening. It was the opinion of everyone that 
all things taken into consideration the Junior trip this 
year was a decided success. 



Those who have read Victor Hugo's " Les Miser- 
ables " must remember his description of the great 
sewers of Paris in the time of the French Revolu- 
tion. Those of you who have traveled in England no 
doubt remember the damp, illy lighted, underground 
sytem of tram transit. It is my purpose to tell you a 
story connected with the building of a more modern 
underground passage — the Boston subway. In the 
construction of one of the sections of this tunnel it 
became necessary to cut through the midst of what 
had once been an old burial ground, and although 
public sentiment was very much opposed to this dese- 
cration, yet, in the end the commissioners won the 
day and the work of removing the bones of the early 
Bostonians was commenced at once. As it happened 
I was placed in charge of this work, and for several 
days was kept busy over-seeing the resurrection of 
old caskets and their removal to other ground. I will 
pass over much of what must needs be a grewsome 
story. Most of the graves held but gapping, ghastly 
bones, all else having long since returned to dust. 
However, 1 found many curious things of interest 
among the effects of these old Puritan dead men, 
several of which I may sometime make known to the 
world, but for the present I shall simply recounter one, 



28 



AGGIE LIFE, 



which on the whole, I think is the least strange of 
them all. We met, during the course of our work, 
with one very peculiar inscription engraved on a com- 
mon stone slab which lay hidden some feet below the 
surface. I was at a loss at first to divine the meaning 
of the strange scrawl, but when I had removed the 
moss which obscured the writing, I made out these 
words : 

SI— MY— PIRK, 
One of the Boston Tea Party 
Died in 1775 
Rest His Soul in Peace. 
Here was something interesting. The name I could 
not make out, but that he was a member of the Bos- 
ton tea party was enough. I ordered the men to raise 
his bones with extra care, feeling great respect and no 
little awe, in the presence of so famous a Revolutionary 
character. This casket was stouter and better pre- 
served than the others, as if it felt the responsibility of 
holding so bold and brave a spirit. With a feeling of 
reverence we gazed upon what were once the remains 

of but were now simply a few shining 

bones. Here was a ring of gold; and here was what 
might have been the remnant of a quill, possibly he 
had been buried in the disguise in which he and his 
comrades had captured the English tea. Ah ! but 
what was it I spied last down among some rubbish in 
one corner. It was this, written on an old parchment 
and so faint as hardly to be discernible. Part of it 
had decayed, or been eaten away, and the signa- 
tures were entirely lost ; but I made out : The tea, 
contrary to the usual supposition, was not emptied into 
the harbor, but was gathered together and carried 
ashore; only the weighted empty chests being thrown 
overboard. The confiscated tea was buried for the time 
being in — Here it broke abruptly off. This document 
I kept, in fact, it is in my possession to-day. For a 
long time I sought every conceivable means of deter- 
mining what had been written at the close of the doc- 
ument. I sought mind readers, fortune tellers and 
even astrologers but without success. Finally I was 
transferred to another part of the works. One day, 
while we were excavating along the common near 
what was once known as old Beaver Street,the foreman 
summoned me to superintend the opening up of an old 
cave or dug-out. Imagine my surprise and delight 



when I discovered tier upon tier of tea boxes piled 
high up upon one another. Investigation revealed that 
there were exactly three hundred and forty-two chests 
which had in all probability laid there for one hundred 
and twenty-three years. Further investigation 
revealed that the chests were empty ; possibly the tea 
had been sold or used in the days of the colonies ; but 
more probably, time had extended its destructive hand 
and had reduced to dust the confiscated tea which in 
the exciting days of the Revolution had escaped dis- 
tribution, owing to the immediate separation of the 
various members concerned in its removal. 



SOME NEW ARABIAN NIGHTS. 

the fate of GRIMSBY. 

When I first ^new Grimbsy, he was a tall, thin, 
pompous fellow with a dashing pair of sidewhiskers, 
and a peculiar, yet rather attractive limp in his gait. 
He frequented the docks where the East Indiamen 
were wont to tie up and unload, and gave himself the 
airs of a connoisseur in all matters relating to the 
exports of the effete east. He prided himself upon 
his ability to settle the many disputes which so often 
came up between the loafers about the wharves. On 
such momentous occasions, he would assume a rather 
stern, official air which simply made him ridiculous, 
but which he himself could not appreciate owing to 
his great egotism ; he would listen attentively to both 
sides of the question in dispute and then give his 
judgment with much deliberation. 

I was, at that time, an under-clerk in a large tea 
warehouse, and I easily remember with what awe we 
youngsters would look upon this paragon of learning. 
Since then, many of us, who were numbered among 
his disciples, have somewhat changed our opinions of 
the man and I doubt, if ever he should appear upon 
the scene again, that he would receive the adulation 
which we lavished upon him in our younger days. 

I never knew the man by any other name than 
that of Grimsby : whether he had another, I am not 
prepared to say, but Grimsby he was called and 
Grimsby was the name by which we knew him. 
Whence he came and whither he was to go were 
alike insoluble ; and what he did to earn his salary 
was always a deep mystery to us. That he existed 
we all knew but there seemed to be no reason for that 
existence. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



29 



The sole talent that Grimsby possessed was that of 
being able to " boss " his fellow men and to assume 
all the airs of his exalted station. There was no 
official, from the swathy sea captains to the stokers 
who could not be instructed by Grimsby in those par- 
ticular duties for which his station was adapted. It 
became, at last, very fatiguing to listen to the fellow's 
long tirades on how to make some contrary current or 
upon the best manner of replacing a split steam tube. 
The engineers were daily instructed in the work of 
running their engines, and the old captains used to 
swear by the hour while in port, as Grimsby would try 
to show them one of his short methods of getting out 
a reckoning without the use of the tables. 

This state of affairs got to be rather alarming and 
several of the more touchy seamen threatened to 
leave, when suddenly Grimsby subsided and became 
as peaceful as a lamb. At first we boys feared that 
he was sick, and we offered him all sorts of advice 
warranted to cure anything, but it was of no avail, and 
Grimsby began losing flesh. Then he neglected his 
work and shaved off his noble side-whiskers. Still we 
all sympathized with him and offered him all the aid 
we could ; yet the company could not see the' case in 
the light that we did, and Grimsby was asked to 
resign. 

After some weeks of enforced idleness we secured 
for the poor fellow a berth as under-steward and, for a 
time, thought that we had put him on his legs again 
as his old habit of " bossing" was coming rapidly back, 
but it did not last, as after a week's vacation ashore, 
Grimsby did not ship again. 

After that I lost sight of the fellow for some years 
but I heard in a round-about way that he would peri- 
odically resume his old manner only to sink back into 
a mere nonentity after a few weeks at his work. 
These relapses would result after a vacation of some 
days or after a prolonged stay in port. This peculiar 
fact impressed some of the boys and they tried to 
keep him at sea as much as possible. 

Time moved along slowly before I again chanced to 
see Grimsby and then it was for the last time. I had 
changed my work to a more congenial field, when my 
duty called me down by the river where some 
divers were preparing to strengthen a bridge. Soon 
after I arrived a diver came puffing to the surface, 
threw off his casque and begin swearing fyriously at 



the two men who worked the pump ; the trouble 
was that the men had grown neglectful of their duty and 
had not forced down sufficient air for the diver below. 
Imagine my surprise on learning that the dirty, slimy 
diver was Grimsby, once so neat and trim. He still 
had the same old manner and I judged that he had 
not been ashore lately from this exercise of his 
managerial talents. 

Above us, walking on the bridge, was a woman 
pushing a baby carriage in which sat, or rather 
reclined, two children, while at least seven more 
trailed about her skirts. She seemed totally uncon- 
scious of the work going on about her until Grimsby 
began to swear, and then she pricked up her ears as 
will a hound when close on the trail. At first she 
could not locate the noise, but soon she got the range, 
and with an angry look, she shouted in a high pierc- 
ing voice ; — " Grimsby 1" 

Instantly the swearing stopped and Grimsby wilted ; 
simply wilted . Not another word was said ; but 
dressed just as he was, he moved off and joined the 
woman, as meek as a whipped cur. I watched them 
move slowly out of sight, and then I sought some 
explanation of his queer movements. 

" Why, don't you know, sir?" said one of the 
workers to me, " That's his wife, sir. His wife 
Rebekah." 

That, then, was the explanation of Grimsby's con- 
duct. I could nearly name the exact day of his 
marriage. Poor Grimsby ! It is bad enough, gentle- 
men, to marry a shrew, but when you have nine 
children, all girls, and each one takes after her mother 
it is no wonder that one takes to diving for a live- 
lihood. 

Many years after, I was walking through a small 
church-yard in a country village when I came across 
this inscription ; 

Sacred to the memory of 

Grimsby 

erected by 

his loving wife 

Rebekah 

and his nine daughters. 

188— A. D. 

This then was the fate of Grimsby ,to be mocked even 
in the grave, by a loving wife and nine daughters each 
one of whom resembled her mother. 



30 



agg: 



Lik'-ii- 



After I had finished, there was silence for some 
minutes while I relighted my pipe, then the muscian 
sighed and murmured, "Poor Grimsby!" Perhaps 
there was a fellow feeling between the two, perhaps 
not ; who can tell ? 

Then the Persian, the dealer in rugs, spoke up, and 
said that the adventures of Grimsby were certainly 
hard to bear but that they did not compare with the 
exciting events that once happened to a friend of his 
in the old walled city of Bagdad. On being pressed 
by us all to relate those very thrilling scenes, he laid 
aside his pipe and began. 

"THE EXTRAORDINARY ADVENTURES OF ABDUL MORAD." 
(to be continued.) 

F. A. M. 



FOOTBALL. 
WiLLiSTON, 6 ; M. A. C., 4. 

Williston defeated M. A. C. Saturday, Oct. 23, on 
the campus by the score of 6-4. Both teams played 
snappy ball at times. Williston made all of her gains 
on mass plays which were directed at the line. Aggie 
made several gains through the tackles and guards. 
The crowd was good-sized and the cheering on both 
sides was strong. Watson and Righter of Amherst 
acted as referee and umpire respectively. 

Williston kicked off poorly and the ball was downed 
on Aggie's 40 yd. line. Then M. A, C. worked her 
famous tackle plays, and proceeded to walk down the 
field until they reached Williston's 20 yard line where 
the ball was lost on a fumble. At this stage of the 
game the tables turned and Williston directed her 
mass plays at our line with good effect. It was a new 
thing to the M. A. C. team, and they were unable to 
stop it. It did not yield them much distance, two or 
three yards at a time, but it was enough for them to 
keep the ball, and thus they worked the ball down the 
field, until Moulton crossed the line for a touchdown. 
Pond kicked the goal making the score 6-0. 

Eaton kicked to Williston's 10 yard line where 
Thomas was downed in his tracks. Williston suc- 
ceeded in making steady gains until she reached 
Aggie's 20 yard line where the M. A. C. line stood as 
firm as a wall, and held Williston for four downs. On 
the very next play Aggie again lost the ball on a fum- 
ble. For a second time Aggie showed good strength 



by holding the Williston team for four successive 
downs, and was making steady gains when time was 
called. 

Aggie came on the field in the second half deter- 
mined to win. 

Eaton opened the half by kicking to the 20 yard 
line. Williston, by steady gains, advanced the ball to 
the centre of the field where they lost it on downs. 
At this point of the game Aggie braced up and made 
steady gains through left guard and tackle, until 
Eaton was pushed over the line for a touch-down. 
Eaton punted out but Cooke failed to make a fair 
catch. Had Cooke caught this punt out the score 
might have been a tie. During the remainder of the 
game the ball was in Williston's possession most of 
the time. The summary : 

M. A. C. 
Halligan, r. e. 
Eaton, r. t. 
Cooke, r. g. 
Parmenter, c. 
Stanley, 1. g., 
Beaman, 1. t.. 
Walker, 1. e.. 
Canto, q. b. 
Crowell, r. h. b. 
Rogers, r. h. b., 
Gile, f. b. 

Umpire — Watson, Amherst. 
Line men — Turner M. A. C. 
Time 20 m. halves. 



Williston. 

1. e. Nutting 

1. t. Griswold 

1. g. Steele 

c. Nelson 

r. g. Foster 

r. t. H. Pond 

r. e. Kulen 

q. b. Curtiss 

1. h. b. Pond 

r. h. b. Thomas 

f. b. Moulton 

Referee — Righter, Amherst. 

'99 and Leach of Williston. 



FOOTBALL SCORES. 



Oct. 20.— Harvard 24, N. A. A., 0. 

Yale 18, Brown 14. 

U. of P. 24, Penn. State College 0. 

Wesleyan 24, Amherst 0. 

M. I. T. 16, Andover 6. 

Tufts 6, Boston University 0. 
Oct. 23.— Harvard 18, Brown 0. 

Yale 24, Indians 9. 

Princeton 10, Cornell 0. 

U. of P. 46, Lafayette 0. 

Wesleyan 22 Williams 0. 

West Point 30. Tufts 0. 

Bates 6, Colby 6. 

U. of Maine 14, M. I. T. 0. 

Holy Cross 10, Boston College 4, 
Oct. 27, — Harvard 22, Newtowne 0. 

Princeton 12, Elizabeth 0. 

Wesleyan 14, Amherst 0. 

Tufts 12, Boston College 4. 

Swarthmore 16, Johns Hopkins 0, 



acjGie life. 



31 



THE '99 BANQUET. 

It is the custom at Aggie for the Freshman class, 
to tender the Juniors a compHmentary dinner and that 
1901 is zealous to keep up such a good old custom, is 
proven by the prompt and most pleasing manner in 
which she has treated '99. 

The dinner was given at the Parker House, Bos- 
ton, on the evening of October 26. The entire Junior 
class was present and after enjoying a most elaborate 
menu the following toasts were responded to : 
Looking Backward, C. M. Walker 

Horoscope of '99, B. H. Smith 

The Facuhy, D. A. Beaman 

'99 Index, E. iVI. Wright 

Sensations of a High Bluff, J. R. Dutcher 

1900, C. W. Smith 

1901, W.E.Hinds 
M. A. C, M. H. Pingree 
Stump Speech, W. H. Armstrong 

F. H. Turner acted as toastmaster while D. A. 
Beaman and W. H. Armstrong were end men. All 
of the toasts were good, but that of B. H. Smith de- 
serves special mention. Stories, jokes and roasts 
were then added to the evening's festivities, the jovial 
class breaking up at a late hour. Many thanks are 
due 1901 as well as to J.R.Dutcher and C. W. Smith 
for the extensive and complete preparations. 



^o^tes and ^omnn^n-ts. 



Although we have played the greater part of our 
foot ball games, yet the most important ones and those 
which are very essential are yet to follow. Up to this 
time we have not played a single league game and the 
first of the championship games occurs next Saturday. 
Now every man who has played and every one who can 
play, should come out and practice for we should 
have nothing put in the way of winning the game with 
Storrs. Let every one in College back up the team 
to make the best showing it has ever made, in the 
games which are yet to be played. 
* * 

* 

This fall a new target has been placed on the site 
of the old one, some distance below the barn. It is 
a very great improvement on the former target and is 
slightly different, there being a pit in front, in which 
the marker stands. Target practice has just com- 



menced and will be continued through the fall. As 
there seems to be a good deal of interest taken in 
shooting would it not be in favor to have a match 
between the companies. In many other colleges 
where there is military training, marksmanship 
forms a most important part of a man's education in 
military affairs. 

* * 

* 

Is it not possible to increase the power of the elec- 
tric lights in our dormitories? The lamps for the 
past few weeks have given auch a dim light that it is 
very difficult to do any studying whatever, and for 
those students who have any trouble with their eyes 
the effect is extremely annoying.' As it is now two 
small globes do not more than half light a room. We 
sincerely trust that some improvement can be made 
in the manner in which our rooms are lighted. 



©Ilc^f 



— Toast ! 

— Junior Supper. 

— Spooks in chapel ? 

— Foot ball game Saturday. 

—Storrs beat Rhode Island 22-8. 

— Several deer have been seen in the vicinity of 
Mt. Toby. 

— The freshmen have had an opportunity of making 
up their conditions. 

— The sophomores are still enjoying their Saturday 
morning prize drills. 

— The sophomores are very punctual about attend- 
ing the regular exercises. 

— The outer woodwork of South College has re- 
ceived a fresh coat of paint. 

— W. S. Fisher, '98, is taking Librarian work at 
the Amherst College Library. 

— Closed cars are now used on the electric road. 
The new closed car is a big improvement on the old 
one. 

— We are all well pleased with the work our presi- 
dent is doing in trying to get more students here, and 
such words as he spoke to us a few mornings ago are 
certainly encouraging. 



32 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Messrs. Fisher, Graves and Dorman are singing 

with a chorus which is to give a concert at North 
Amherst in a few weeks. 

— The sophomores are debating the advisability of 
procuring class sweaters. It would be well if the 
freshmen would do the same. Nothing like keeping 
up the College customs. 

— The new rifle pit has been completed and the 
sophomores have been having target practice. The 
seniors are making rapid progress in the Wig Wags 
and Heliograph. Company drill will soon be the order. 

— Measures should be adopted by the reading room 
directors to prevent the tearing and cutting of our 
College papers. Any man who wiii intentionally 
abuse the privileges of others is not fit to attend this 
College. 

The Shelburne Falls Athletic club defeated the 

" Aggie " eleven 4-0 on Sat. Oct. 16. In the first 
half our team outplayed their opponents, but in the 
second half Shelburne Falls managed to make a 
touchdown but failed to kick a goal. 

Last Wednesday afternoon the freshman foot 

ball team beat the Sunderland eleven 32-0. As the 
score indicates, the freshmen had things pretty much 
their own way. Barry, Otis and Ahearn made the 
best gains for the freshmen, and Barry kicked several 
pretty goals. 

• — The Columbia ninety-eight chainless bicycles are 
now ready and selling at $125. The chainless wheel 
is in all probability the wheel of the future. The price 
of the chain wheels will be very low next season, and 
it is very doubtful if the chainless wheel can stand for 
any length of time at $125. 

— Those freshmen who have not made an exami- 
nation of the Zoological and Botanical museums 
should do so at once. When they go home they 
should be thoroughly acquainted with the various 
departments so that they may be able to give an 
accurate description of each. 

— There is no use denying it, the Aggie rooters 
were sick when the Williston team whipped our much 
boasted, swelled headed eleven. It was an odd com- 
bination of regular players and subs, that represented 
our College, and the combination didn't work. Wil- 
liston played good snappy foot ball and after the first 
five minutes of play there could be no doubt as to 
which team would win, 



— We now have a botanical laboratory which is 
without exception the best of its kind for student 
work. We trust that in the near future the veterinary 
and zoological departments may have equally 
good facilities. The best possible results can be 
obtained with only first class laboratories. 

— Ten or twelve years ago a great many trained 
bears used to be exhibited through the country vil- 
lages and towns, but recently they have not been very 
common. A few days ago, however, a particularly 
fine specimen visited the College, and showed the 
boys how to drill and the also do double shuffle. 

— The beauty of our College buildings could be 
greatly improved by planting ivy about them, and by 
taking better care of that which is already planted. 
As the concrete extends to the walls of South College 
it would be necessary to remove small pieces of it 
before vines could be started ; but the expense of the 
work would be more than paid for in a few years in 
the attractiveness of our College. 

— The freshmen must be made to understand that 
the sidewalk in front of South College is not a public 
dumping ground. The rubbish is swept from the 
walk onto the grass bank, which for years has been 
the seat of our astronomical observations. We do 
not intend to have this grassy bank made dangerous 
by broken glass and walnut shucks, so all new men 
will take heed of this timely warning. 

— 'Varsity practice must resume its former snap. 
Men must come out. We cannot expect to do effect- 
ive work in any of the ensuing games unless more 
interest is evinced. Just because we have met with 
bad luck there is no reason whatever, for our men to 
stop playing. Come out, every man, who can, and 
every one can if he has a mind to, and do good honest 
work. There is only one way to do good honest work, 
and that is : Do team work and obey your captain ! 

- — The junior class in company with Dr. Welling- 
ton, took advantage of the Boston Food Fair excur- 
sion last week Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. 
Besides attending the fair they made a tour of inspec- 
tion of several large factories, noting especially the 
practical results of applied Chemistry. On Tuesday 
night the class enjoyed a dinner on the Freshmen at 
the Parker House. Toasts were given by Walker, 
Beaman, Wright, E. M. Armstrong, Hinds, Pingree, 
B. H. Smith, C. W. Smith, and Dutcher. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



33 



— Early in the evening of the 27th of October the 
freshmen, after defeating the Sunderland foot ball 
team by the overwhelming score of 32-0, feeling a 
sensation of expansion in the upper regions, desired to 
celebrate such an unusual occurence as a freshmen 
victory. It being the time of the year when the juice 
of the forbidden fruit floweth into kegs and jugs, these 
young aspirants for fame and honor gathered unto 
themselves numerous of these jugs and kegs, and 
wended their way to a suit of rooms in one of the bar- 
racks, where other more solid refreshment had been 
provided. Then began the revelry, drinking, eating, 
and drinking. To the great disgust of everybody not 
in the party the merry-making continued till early 
morning, when, by the tremendous efforts of the pro- 
prietor of the ranch and his pard the party was broken 
up. 



umns. 



Alumni, the LIFE needs your sub- 
scriptions. 

'90.— Mr. Ed. Gregory and family of Marblehead, 
Mass., visited Amherst last week. 

'91. — Arthur H. Sawyer, civil engineer, Metropoli- 
tan Water Board, Hudson, Mass. Residence, Sterling. 

'91. — The Life extends its sympathy to Mr. 
and Mrs. M. A. Carpenter in the death of their infant 
daughter, Oct. 14. 

'92. — Cyrus M. Hubbard, drummer for Crocker 
Fertilizer Chemical Co., Buffalo, N. Y. Address, 
Sunderland, Mass. 

'92. — Henry M. Thomson, assistant agriculturist 
Hatch Experiment Station, M. A. C, Amherst. 

'92. — Miss Jessie R. Tarbox married to Mr. Alfred 
T. Beals, Sept. 2, at Greenfield, Mass. Address, 10 
Church St., Greenfield. 

'92. — Miss Elizabeth E. Sutliff married to Mr. 
Henry B. Emerson at Schenectady, N. Y. Resi- 
dence, 616 Liberty St., Schenectady. 

'92. — Miss Charlotte E. Sargent and Mr. Henry E. 
Crane, married June 2. Residence, 13 Elm St., 
Quincy, Mass. 

'92. — At their reunion, June 22, the class presented 
Mr. Wm. Fletcher of Chelmsford, Mass., with the 



class cup for his daughter Rachel. Address, Chelms- 
ford, Mass. 

'92. — Cyrus M. Hubbard and Miss Blanche Sophia 
Ball married Oct. 27, at Montague, Mass. Mr. 
Hubbard has just completed a set of new buildings 
on his meadow farm including house and barns. 
Address, Sunderland Meadows, Mass. 

'92. — Jewell B. Knight is teaching in the Belcher- 
town high school, Belchertown, Mass. 

'92. — Rob't H. Smith, formerly assistant chemist 
at the Hatch Experiment Station, is now studying in 
the University of Gottingen. His course is that of 
Agricultural Chemistry, Physiological Botany and 
Physics. His address is, Unt. Karspi^ile 14 Gottingen, 
Germany. 

'93. — Fred G. Bartlett, second gardener for E. H. 
R. Lyman, Northampton, Mass. Address, Hadley, 
Mass. 

'93. — Cotton A. Smith, secretary and treasurer, 
N. B. Blackstone Co., (dry goods) Los Angeles, Cal. 
171-173 North Spring Street. 

'94. — Married, Wednesday, Oct. 25, at North 
Amherst. Miss Kate M. Taylor to Mr, Joseph H. 
Putnam. 

'94. — Married, Oct. 14, in Central Presbyterian 
Church of New York city by the Rev. Wilton Merle 
Smith, Helen, daughter of Major G. F. Merriam of 
Twin Oaks, Cal., to Frederic Lowell Green of South- 
ampton, N. Y. P. O. Box 266, Southampton, N. Y. 

'94. — A. C. Curtis, instructor in English at Kenyon 
Military Academy, Gambler, Ohio. 

'94. — A. H. Cutter, Harvard Medical School, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

'95. — Frank L. Warren, student of medicine at 
Univ. of Penn., Philadelphia, Penn. Address, 330 
Lancaster Ave. 

'95. — Maurice J. Sullivan, superintendent of Rocks 
Farm, Littleton, N. H., spent a few days in town last 
week. 

'95. — Henry A. Ballou, professor of Entomology 
and Botany at Storrs Agricultural College, Conn., 
visited friends in town last week. 

'95. — Waher L. Morse, assistant engineer, .N. Y., 
N. H. & Hartford R. R., Kneeland St., Boston. 
Address, Middleboro, Mass. 



34 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'96. — Horace C. Burrington, superintendent of the 
Luther Smith ('93) estate. Address, Manteno, 111. 

'96. — Frank L. Clapp, civil engineer, distribution 
dep't, Metropolitan Water Board, 3 Mt. Vernon St., 
Boston, very kindly expresses his feeling for the future 
welfare of the Life. Many thanks. His address is 
179 Boston St., South Boston, Mass. 

'96. — L. F. Clark's address is Barre, Mass., and 
not Ware as was stated in last issue. 

'97. — Albin M. Kramer, civil engineer, assistant 
cement inspector, dam and acqueduct dep't, Metro- 
politan Water Works. Residence, 9 .Spruce St., 
Clinton, Mass. 

'96. — L. L. Cheney, has entered the college of 
veterinary of the Univ. Penn. Address, 3471 Sam- 
son St., Philadelphia, Penn. 

'97. — George A. Drew is now in charge of the 
horticultural dep't left vacant by the absence of J. H. 
Putnam. 

'97. — C. F. Palmer, post-graduate student at M. 
A. C. Address, 1 16 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

'97. — P. H. Smith, starch determiner, dep't of 
foods. Hatch Experiment Station, M. A. C. Address 
Amherst. 

'97, School of Dairying, — Miss Grace L. Bronson 
to Charles A. Smith were married Oct. 12, at Ash- 
field. At home after Nov. 30. Address, Ashfield, 
Mass. 



Alumni, the LIFE 
scriptions. 



needs your Bulb- 



THE DEPARTMENT OF FERTILIZERS. 

One of the great steps of the present century in the 
line of progress has been the great effort of putting 
science into practice. This fact may be well shown 
in various departments of industry. 

When we see the locomotive moving with its 
mighty power, carrying hundreds of pounds, we say 
great is science. It is the work which impresses 
itself on the minds of the masses and makes them 
believe that there is such a thing as science and that 
it is a great power. But have we ever looked for the 
practical application of it in some other directions, 



than those which have been very common to the 
mass of people in the course of time ? Science has 
been used also to a great advantage in the line of soil 
culture. To day the leading nations of the world 
enjoy its benifit and realize that the index of their 
civilization is denoted by the progress which they have 
made in Agricultural works. A country where 
Agricultural science is running side by side with other 
industrial sciences, is never threatened by the panic 
of famine. 

To day America as an industrial country competes 
with the leading nations of Europe because she has 
not overlooked also this part of the question. Namely, 
as in any other department of life she is struggling for 
the advancement of agriculture. To that end we 
have a number of colleges with their experimental 
stations doing great work in this line. Our college, as 
one of them, not only is doing good work but also 
stands as one of the foremost in the country in that 
branch of science. These are not mere words in which 
we like to praise our College but solid work is speaking 
in its favor. A survey of its work, will be enough to 
convince anyone who is willing to get information of 
the service which it renders to the Country. I shall 
take this time only one of its departments, "The de- 
partment of fertilizers " and describe the work which 
is done. 

The work in this department is carried on under the 
direction of Dr. Charles A. Coessmann, without doubt 
the best agricultural chemist in the country. It involves 
the official inspection of all the materials used for 
manurial purposes, without reference to cost, placed 
on sale in the markets of this state. During the 
course of the year between 400 and 500 samples of 
manurial substances are collected by an agent from the 
department and analyses are placed on file at the Ex- 
periment Station. These samples are taken from the 
local dealers and are guaranteed by the manufacturer 
to contain certain percentages of known elements of 
manurial value. The duty of this department is to 
control the work on the sampled goods and enforce 
the laws regarding licences. Aside from this official 
work examinations are carried on with reference to all 
materials sent on by farmers for information. This 
gratuitous work amounting to several hundred analyses 
includes the examination of fertilizers, soils and waste 



AGGIE LIFE. 



35 



products, of interest to the farmers, as far as their 
value is concerned. 

There are also constantly carried on investigations 
with reference to the effect of special forms of fer- 
tilizer on the composition and general character of 
agricultural and industrial crops. The examination 
of tobacco raised in different parts of the Connecticut 
valley with special formulae of fertilizers prepared by 
the department, has furnished of late important dates 
concerning the general effects of different forms of 
fertilizers on the growth, composition and quality of 
the leaf. 

The transformation and mutual reactions which 
chemical substances suffer, under certain conditions, 
while passing through the soil, has in the past received 
close attention and promises to furnish a prolific field 
for future investigation regarding the establishment of 
a rational system for providing plants with food. 

The expenses incurred are not by license fees as 
a special appropriation is provided by the trustees. 

The station is supplied with the best equipments and 
its work is regarded in the different parts of the coun- 
try as a criterion. 

Three graduates of our college are aiding Dr. 
Goessmann in his work as assistant chemists. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

" The Day of their Wedding " is the title of one of 
our latest books of fiction. The author, W. D. 
Howells is well known and we now have several 
books that have been written by him, in our college 
library. The story is a very interesting one, giving 
one a good idea of the Shakers. The book is full of 
illustrations which adds greatly to the life of the story. 

On March 23, 1896, Jacob L. Greene read a paper 
before the Hartford Board of Trade, entitled " Our 
Currency Problems." This paper has been printed 
and bound into book form. The contents are a valu- 
able help as they treat the subject of currency in a 
very plain way yet concisely and accuratley. 

Clarence M. Weed has recently written a book 
entitled " Life Histories of American Insects." In this 
interesting book of two hundred and seventy pages, 
twenty six different species of American Insects are 
thoroughly described, in fact the whole history of each 
insect is carefully explained. 

In addition to these books we have also received 



he following books : 

Cleopatra, (2 vols.) By George Ebers. 

Vol. II of " The Literary History of tine American 
Revolution," by Tyler. 

General Ci^emistry, by Hindricks. 

Sleep ; its Pliysiology, Patheology, and Psycology, 
by Marie De Manace'ine. 

"Am.erican Literature During tiie Colonial Times," by 
Moses Coit Tyler, Professor of American History in 
Cornell University. It is with much pleasure that the 
student of literature opens these two volumes, whose 
contents are devoted to a reviev/ of the early and 
generally unknown writers of the Colonial Era in 
America. It is an acknowledged statement that to-day 
America has a literature that can taKe its place 
honorably and fearlessly beside that of any other 
country. The great writers of New England and 
other localities have breathed into their works the 
essence of American thought. Despite their obliga- 
tions to the rich culture and the history of the Old 
World, Irving, Longfellow, Hawthorne, Emerson, 
Lowell, Bryant, and others have distinctly and 
naturally drawn their lasting power from the Spirit 
that was born and reared among the wild and unex- 
plored forests of the New World. The early settlers 
of Massachusetts Bay and of Virginia planted the 
seed of a new nation . and their homely, practical 
writers did all they could to nourish the seed. With- 
out their unceasing words of exhortation, narrow, 
crude, and ludicrous as much of it may now seem, 
our present nation and our present literature world 
have been an impossibility. To-day, he who would 
understand the writings of America's greatest thinkers, 
must first know those whose names have been too 
long concealed amid piles of books in dark library 
corners. The treatment of those colonial writers by 
Professor Tyier is practical, interesting, and scholarly. 
Along with his own criticism he has given an exten- 
sive number of long quotations from the pages of the 
authors themselves. Assuming, in short, the position 
of the true critic, he endeavors, as he says, " in these 
volumes to make an appropriate mention of every one 
of our early authors whose, writings, whether many or 
few, have any appreciable literary merit, or throw any 
helpful light upon the evolution of thought and of style 
in America, during those flourishing and indespensable 
days." H. B. 



36 



AGGIE LIFE, 



Dennis — -"The great astronomers have seen a new 
asteroid/' 

Mike — " They kin kape the animal. O'im satis- 
fied with a common horse to roid." — Ex. 

Stout lady (at the street crossing) — " Could you see 
me across the street?" 

Policeman — '-Sure, mam, I could see you ten 
times the distance aisy." — Ex. 

Sampson, the strongest man whom we read about in 
the good book, was the first to advertise. He took 
two solid columns to demonstrate his strength, when 
several thousand people tumbled to his scheme and 
he brought down the house. — Ex. 




Oiatehmakef and Optieian. 

Prompt skillful attention given to all fine 
and complicated watchwork. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, larccst and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALl.. 

CHARLES G. AYRES, 



SINGLE AND DOUBLE TEAMS 

t Reasonable Prices. ^^S' 



A. B. CALL, 

273 Hain St., 



Society ^^ Cater ingf. 



S^^BEST MEALS SERVED IN NORTHAMPTON,,^ 



GIVE US A CALL. 








secies 



The Hartford Sin- 
gle-Tube Tires with 
which Columbia 
Bicycles are fitted 
are the standard 
tires. None equal 
them in comfort, 
durability, or ease 
of repair. 

The Columbia Art Catalogrue is free 
if you call.- 




4 

sr 
5 

IS* 
« 

> 



Aggie life. 




'96 KEATING BICYCLES 



II3=-SEE TECA-T OTJKTT-E. 



MgMTlBf © ©MMH©, 




AGENT. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



108 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



OOA.Iv.- 



THOMAS C. DILLON, 



-OOA^Iv. 



-DEALER IN- 



HARD AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 




S— SL 



J®— S 



OF WESTERM MASSACHUSETTS. 
Work Guaranteed or money refunded. Give us a trial. 



102 Main St., opp. Court House, 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Lovelly 



The Photographer y 

To the class of '97 M. A. C. MAKES A SPECIALTY 
OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



E, K. BENNETT, 

Jeweler, 
Optician, 
Watchmakei . 

First door from Post Office. 

FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED 



^JbrGf^K L>lb iij. 



C. S. G.V1E.S, D. D. S. 

E. N. BKOW^X, D. D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 



STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

EANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 






mm 










(Dassaehusetts flgpieultupal College. 

AT THE 

OOLIaEGE FARM 

WE HAVE PUEE BRED 

}\\M\ U% aiii Soytiii Sleep 



And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 











AGrGi.lLi Lri'^-^'o 



E. H. IQICKINBOH, B. H. B. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

9 TO 12 .A.. 3Sd:., 1-30 TO 5 T^. X/C. 



Etlier and Nirous Oxide Gas administered wbeii desired. 



G. i. CHAiBEBIiJfi, 

Liverv and Feed Stable. 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 



PHOENIX ROW, AMHERST, MASS 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ibtje:b:eiz^ o-ooids. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



JtS-Bepairing done while, you wait.JSi 
S I'HmNlX ROW. 



0\ t Baa I BbA Is* I 

Our store has been repaired and improved throughout, acd 
our stock of 

Furaiie, Carpets, Drap8nes,8l2ies, etc, 

is all new. We solicit an inspection. 



M. N. SPEAR, 

oo^S8l[, Statioir it ImMw. 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR AGGIE STUDENTS. 



RAZORS HOIVKD, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amheust House Annex, Amhekst, Mass. 



3Pza:..^p?<jiv£^A^oisT. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night call ; responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

)pgFatlYe Steam 

and Carpet lieiic»atin£ Estalilisliiiient, 



F¥« 



.Agrsri^ ^^sr^ait. 



HI, ^^^s^iGKnr »o^ 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

N:^s:3>vTisr'jA..CTio3sr ca-xjuA.iiix<^isrT:BEr>, a-/ 
Office : 
Next Dook West of Amity St. School House. 



H. E. £SDWAB.BS, 

|25 and 27 Pleasant St., - Northampton, Mass. 



9 
PALIViEil'S BLOCK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT CONFECTION FRY, 

AND CIGARS AT LOWEST 

PRICES. 

^="GOODS DELIVERED FREE.,.,^ 

li. MEIiliEM^ Manager. 



38 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Our Alumni at their last reunion in June, discussed 
the advisability of changing the old name of their 
Alma Mater. There have been numerous opinions 
expressed during the past few years, by graduates and 
under-graduates, some for and some against this 
change ; but nov/ that the alumni, as a body, have 
brought up this question, as to the benefit v/hich 
would result from a change of the present College 
name it will undoubtedly result in putting an end to 
the discussion in one way or another. Several names 
have been proposed which could be substituted for the 
present Massachusetts Agricultural College. Among 
these the most popular are : The Massachusetts State 
College, The Massachusetts College, and the Massa- 
chusetts College of Science. There are many obsta- 
cles laying in the way, which make a change of 
name difficult. The chief of these is the bringing of 
a measure before the legislature and the difficulty of 
having it passed by a popular vote which is conserva- 
tive and slow to remodel old institutions. Still we are 
confident that should the benefit resulting, be consid- 
ered of enough importance, the measure could be put 
through. Only during the last six months the Maine 
State legislature passed a measure changing the name 
of the Maine State College to the University of Maine. 
The trustees of that institution were convinced that 
under the later title they could open up a broader field 
of study, and prepare a place where more students could 
find instruction in subjects in which they were interested 
without seeking other institutions where the expense was 
apt to be beyond their means. Of the names proposed _ 
our choice would be the Massachusetts College of 
Science as being more appropriate and indicating by 
its name, more nearly, the scope of our curriculum. 
Nowhere in this country are such opportunities offered 
to the student of Biology. Nowhere can a student 
get better instruction in Chemistry, Entomology, Bot- 
any or Bacteriology than at the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. The Sciences of Agriculture and 
Horticulture, as taught here, admitedly stand at the 
head of all our State institutions. Science, is 
the very root of all our courses of study, and as such, 
ought to occupy the position of honor in giving a name 
to the institution, instead of allowing the single branch 
of science,Agriculture,to usurp this position. We await 
the outcome of the graduates' decision with intense 
interest. 



SOME RECENT M. A. C. REUNIONS. 

The " Kommers " held last June at the College was 
not only unique, but a most enthusiastic and satisfying 
gathering. All thanks are due to the promoters of it. 
The most striking points were : First, the address of 
Ex-President Stockbridge. To the more recent grad- 
uates and the present students he is but little known. 
It was a revelation to them to see the force, dignity 
and ability with which he spoke to the gathering on 
the subject nearest his heart. It can be truly said 
that the sentiment of his audience was largely against 
him ; by his speech he won that majority to him. It 
can be asked whether the present system of training 
in colleges, which runs so much to athletics, will turn 
out as fine a product at the age of seventy as this 
old-time athlete of a Massachusetts farm. 

Second, the presiding of the toast-master, Mr. J. 
F. Barrett, 75, was eminently satisfactory. He had 
all the poise of a business man, he carried himself 
with the dignity of a college graduate, and he was 
clear-headed enough to understand all the require- 
ments of the situation ; and we know not of one who 
could have done better than he did. 

Third, the address of Mr. James H. Webb, 73, 
was very fitting ; of one of the first classes, he brought 
down the traditions of the early days, and with that 
beautiful oratory of which he is master, he also cap- 
tured the audience. 

Fourth, the greatest point of interest was the tre- 
mendous enthusiasm which was all the time being 
demonstrated, and which showed to the undergradu- 
ates that those of us who have gone out love our 
Alma Mater dearly. 

It is to be hoped that another " Kommers " may be 
held next June. 

The meeting of the Associate Alumni Wednesday 
morning took a different turn than was expected. As 
a general thing these business meetings are largely 
perfunctory, because the graduates are thoroughly 
tired out by the events of the two previous days. The 
offering, however, of a resolution " that it is consid- 
ered expedient not to change the name of the College 
from that now in use," stirred up a great discussion ; 
following Ex-President Stockbridge's address of the 
night before, the majority believed that the resolution 
should be adopted. Many expressed their great love 
to the College and that under no circumstances the 



AGGIE LIFE. 



39 



na me should be changed. Others who have no con- 
nection with agricultural pursuits and whose study at 
the College has not put thenn in high priced places as 
scientific agriculturists nevertheless protested their 
love for the College : it was pointed out that the num- 
ber of students was far less than it should be : that the 
College had a magnificent equipment for teaching the 
sciences ; that farmers' sons would go to Amherst 
College and not to ours, this even being true of grad- 
uates of our institution ; that the fact, that the name 
distinctly indicated agriculture, gave the impression to 
the world that it was simply a "farm school," while 
the truth was that the College was teaching the 
"science of created things," Ktisology, in a better 
way perhaps than any other college in the country ; 
and if the name should be changed to that of the 
Massachusetts College of Science, or the Massachu- 
setts College, there would be more students. It was 
also considered by all that the subject was grave 
enough to even fight over until a proper solution was 
made. Some stated that it was not time for the 
Alumni Association to express a final opinion, and that 
the trustees and faculty would certainly give the 
alumni a chance to act on the matter before any 
change in name would be made, and it was finally 
voted to table the resolution for one year. 

The eleventh annual dinner of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College Club, of New York, was held at the 
St. Denis Hotel, December 21, 1896. The President 
was Dr. Joseph Edward Root, '76,of Hartford, Conn., 
the Choragus, Mr. Sandford D. Foot, 78. At the 
close of the banquet the President made a lengthy 
and eloquent address. He was followed by President 
Goodell and later by Dr. Goessmann. The latter spoke 
on the work of the Chemical Department ; he gave 
the history of the early work, as to the supervision of 
the manufacture and sale of fertilizers ; he showed us 
very clearly how much original work the College had 
done in his department alone, such being later 
repeated by the United States Government, and no 
credit given the College. 

Mr. Herbert Myrick, of Springfield, editor of the 
Orange Judd publications, spoke at length on the 
depressed condition of the farmers, and gave in detail 
his studies on the Sugar Beet industry, which he later 
presented to a committee of Congress. Dr. John M. 
Benedict, 74, of New Britain, Conn,, talked on the 



value of the College as a preparatory school to the 
study of medicine. He was followed by Mr. James 
H. Webb, 73, of New Haven, Conn. Prof. Edward 
R. Flint. Ph. D. '87, gave us some details of his work 
in the College, and his remarks were supplemented 
by further talk from President Goodell. Other speakers 
were, William P. Birnie, '71, S. C. Thompson, '72, 
John B. Miner, '73, J. F. Barrett, '75, C. E. Beach, 
'82, J. A. Cutter, '82, A. A. Hevia, '83 and W. A. 
Eaton, '86. 

A number of letters were read by the President, 
from which are the following : 

"Amherst, Dec. 15, 1896 
To Dr. J. E. Root, Pres., 

My dear Fellow: — Yours of tlie 12tii inst. duly- 
received. I thank you and the Club for the invitation it con- 
tains, and especially for its kind words of personal remem- 
brance. It has been a pleasure to me to be present at your 
re-unions, it has always been a feast of fat things, physical, 
mental and of memory. The invitations to your two last 
re-unions reached me at my winter home in Florida, where I 
should be at this writing but for trouble here at home, and 
the same prevents my acceptance of your kind invitation. 
My daughter, (Mrs. Tuttle) whose home here was broken up 
two weeks ago preparatory to a removal to Worcester, is sick 
in my house, making it more than difficult for me to leave 
even for a single day. Remember me to the boys, and say 
to them, let us all rally around the M. A. C. Flag, which was 
raised to the world's view by Col. Clark, Marshal P. Wilder, 
and their farmer coadjutors in 1867. 

I am truly yours, 

Levi Stockbridge." 

" Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Executive Department 
Boston, Dec. 15, 1896 
Jos. E. Root, M. D., 
49 Pearl Street, 
Hartford, Conn. 

My dear Su : — I beg to acknowledge receipt of 
your favor of December 12th, conveying to me the courteous 
invitation of the Massachusetts Agricultural College Club of 
New York, to attend their annual banquet to be given in that 
city on Monday evening, December 21. It would give me 
much pleasure to be present but I regret that my official 
duties will make it impossible for me to leave the Common- 
weahh at this time. 

Please accept my thanks and believe me 
Very truly yours, 

Roger Wolcott." 



■' Fort Trumbull, 
New London, Conn.. 

Dec 17, 1896 
J. E. Root, M. D., 
New York City. 

My dear Sir: — I am sincerely grieved to be 
obUged to decline the kind invitation handed me this morn- 
ing to be present this year at the annual meeting of the M. 



40 



AGGIE LIFE. 



A. C. club of New York. Much against my will, it has been 
my fortune hitherto, to invariably decline your invitations. 
This year my plan had been to accept, certainly, should you 
again favor me. That purpose has been set aside by a recent 
change of station to this place. In sending my regrets, you 
will permit me, I am sure, to wish you all a most happy 
meeting. 

Truly yours, 

V. H. Bridgeman." 



Mr. Thompson 72, as chairman of the nominating 
committee, presented the following list of candidates, 
which were unanimously elected : Pres't, Herbert 
Myrick, '82 ; vice-pres't, Frederick W. Morris, 72 ; 
second vice-pres't, Alfred A. Hevia, '83 ; third vice- 
pres't, Louis E. Goessmann, '94; sec'y, treas., Alvan 
L. Fowler, '80 ; choragus, Sandford D. Foot, '78 ; 
historian, John A. Cutter, '82. 

The twelfth annual dinner will be held at the Hotel 
St. Denis, Tuesday, December 21st, at half past six 
o'clock. Dinner tickets, three dollars. All graduates 
and former students are eligible to membership in the 
club, and are cordially invited to attend at this dinner. 
The fee for the dinner ticket should be sent to Mr. 
Fowler by December 15th. All present and former 
members of the Boards of Instruction and Govern- 
ment are invited to be present as guests of the Club, 
without any other formal notice. It Ts only desired 
that they notify Mr. Fowler of their intention to attend. 
All communications should be addressed to Mr. Alvan 
L. Fowler, 138 Centre St., New York City. 

The Historian. 
New York City, Nov. 9, 1897. 



THE MILTON LECTURES. 

THE FIRST OF A SERIES OF THREE LECTURES BY REV. 

CALVIN STEBBINS OF WORCESTER. SUBJECT : 

JOHN MILTON, THE PURITAN POET. 

On Friday evening, Nov. 5, the Rev. Calvin Steb- 
bins of Worcester delivered a very interesting lecture 
before a fair sized audience gathered at the M. A. C. 
chapel. 

This was not the first appearance of Mr. Stebbins 
before an Aggie audience, and though no introduc- 
tion was required for the majority of the people pres- 
ent, he was formally presented by Pres't Goodell. He 
was received — as he always will be — with a hearty 



welcome from the many who have heard his inspiring 
words before. Mr. Stebbins, by the way, was a class- 
mate of our much respected Pres't Goodell, while 
they were together enrolled as students of Amherst 
College, and from which both were graduated with 
high honors in the spring of '62. 

This was the first of a series of three lectures which 
Mr. Stebbins has kindly promised to deliver at M. A. 
C. upon the great poet, Milton. The subject was 
" John Milton, the Puritan Poet," and a few of the 
more interesting and inspiring thoughts which fell 
from the speaker's lips in simple but expressive ora- 
tory and eloquence, the writer will briefly endeavor, 
so far as he can, to convey to the mind of the reader, 
using his own words accompanied with more or less 
of the lecturer's expressions, as he remembers them. 

At the time of Milton's birth, in 1608, the religious 
air of England savored very strongly of Puritanism 
which had previously given birth to a disturbance 
which now threatened to undermine the very founda- 
tions of religious freedom throughout that country. 
This remarkable Puritanic period of struggling was 
not, however, without its great men. History has 
handed down to us two names that time can never 
obliterate. Oliver Cromwell, the Puritan captain and 
John Milton, the Puritan poet are quiet as fresh in our 
minds to-day as they were in the minds of the Eng- 
lish people two hundred years ago. 

We may properly consider the life of Milton to be 
divided into three distinct, characteristic periods. 
Each one of these found him living in an entirely 
different world, — a world enveloped by and saturated 
with an influencial atmosphere of its own ; and it was 
from among these changing scenes in his life that the 
man arose and achieved greatness for himself. 

The first period and one that naturally excites our 
first attention includes the twenty years from his birth 
to his return to England in 1639. As a young man it 
is said that he was eminently handsome. He also 
possessed a fine physique, and was considered one of 
the best of athletes. He was very fond of his books, 
and his father, who was in comfortable circumstances, 
gave the boy a liberal education. Milton, though 
conscientious in his conduct, had a strong individual- 
ity, and being a decidedly independent thinker and a 
ready speaker his frankness upon several occasions 



AGGIE LIFE. 



41 



promised to involve him in serious trouble. Fortune, 
however, seemed to wait upon him, for he escaped 
punishment many times when it was thought to be in- 
evitable. The poet had a most excellent opportunity 
to engage in church work, as strongly encouraged by 
his parents, but he would not be persuaded to under- 
take the work because his religious convictions and 
ecclesiastical independence would not allow him to 
enter the Established Church. 

Milton was always a lover of Nature and upon a 
warm day in summer he might have been seen reclin- 
ing beneath the grateful shade of his favorite tree, the 
elm. There he would remain for hours, reading 
Petrarch, Dante, or perhaps gazing through the lofty 
branches yielding to the gentle zephyr breezes, into 
the vast ethereal blue beyond. He was too fond of 
his books, however, to be a close observer of Nature. 
In 1632, Milton left Cambridge, after studying 
there for four years, and returned home where he 
remained for about six years. It was during this time 
that he produced some of his choicest poems, 
" Comus," " L'Allegro," " II Penseroso " and others. 
The year 1 638 found the poet making a tour upon the 
Continent. In Florence he met and became greatly 
fascinated with Gallileo and his work. 

At the age of thirty, Milton yet had his life work 
before him, and he possessed an extraordinary ability 
with which to accomplish it. Though a Puritan in 
belief, he was broadminded and unbiased in his opinions. 
When charged with immoralities he replies in a con- 
scientious tone, " I never once deviated from the 
paths of rectitude and righteousness." 

In 1639, the poet returned to his home in London 
where he settled down to the profession of a teacher 
Up to this point in his life, at the age of 32, it is said 
that he never earned a cent, in spite of the fact that 
he had spent over $5000 on his travels. 

A very abrupt transition to the second period — 
1640-1660 — now takes place and we find the man 
engaged in the veritable battle of life. He retaliates 
against all evil, and as strongly defends the good ; but 
in doing so he resorts to the practice of throwing mud 
and becomes, truly, a master in the art. It is said 
that he was so sarcastic and earnest, that it was im- 
possible for him to be genial. He was the object of 
a great deal of ridicule, but to this he replied with all 
the power of his peculiar dignity. 



In 1660 Charles II came to the throne, the restora- 
tion was begun, and consequently the Puritans be- 
came greatly oppressed. And among the latter there 
was no other person who was really hated more than 
John Milton, the Puritan poet. He went into hiding 
and was hunted much the same as were contrabands 
during the late Civil war ; and how he escaped punish- 
ment is too miraculous to be explained. One thing is 
certain, if any man of the Puritan party deserved to 
be " hanged, drawn and quartered," that man was 
John Milton. Blind from early in the fifties, and 
though escaping the gallows by a hair's breadth, the 
poet's life was preserved and " Paradise Lost " the 
greatest Puritan epic ever written was most fortunately 
saved to English literature. 

Blindness eventually proved a hard trial indeed for 
the poet ; but bravely he overcame the natural ten- 
dency of pessimism and advanced into the greatest 
era of intellectual activity that occurred during his 
life. " Paradise Lost," Paradise Regained," "Sam- 
son Agonistes " and several other writings were the 
outcome of many long hours spent in total blindness. 
Were they not well spent and where is there an in- 
stance of greater courage and perseverance ? 

On Sunday, Nov. 8, 1674, Milton died attended 
with little pain. His spirit had fled ere his friends 
discovered that death hovered o'er him. His body 
was laid to rest in the chancel of St. Giles's. Cripple- 
gate ; and near him were also the bodies of his father, 
Fox, Forbes and DeFoe. Three years later, his 
memory was honored by a bust, which was given by 
Benson. In 1862, a monument was erected which 
bore his name, the dates of his birth and death, his 
father's birth and " Paradise Lost." The church of St. 
Harwick, London, contains a Milton memorial window, 
— a beautiful tribute to the dead man. On the various 
panels are pictured striking scenes taken from the 
poet's life — " Dictating ' Paradise Lost' to His 
Daughters," " Milton's Visit to Gallileo," and several 
other appropriate scenes. Our beloved Whittier, in 
true appreciative style, also adds to the memory of 
the great poet here, with a few lines of well written 
verse. We love and esteem the name of John Milton 
not so much for his character, perhaps, as for the 
unperishable works which he has left us and which 
express quite truly the closing thoughts of his life, 

C. F. P. '97. 



42 



AGGlE LIFE, 



SOME OF MY POETS. 
( From an old scrap-book. ) 
Friend of my moods ! Whose oft turned leaves 

Present to view those I hold dear ; 
Whose storied page a tale foretells 

Of many a sigh, or many a cheer ; 
What hours have I pored thee o'er, 

And planned thy complicated scheme 
Of seeming discord that should paint, 

With well-filled brush, a poet's dream. 

And yet 1 hardly know thy worth, 

Oh transient muse of sunny clime ; 
Thy " Fifty Men and Women" call 

For sterner mind, and quicker time. 
Still Hamelin's Piper never played 

More magic notes than are thine own, 
As through the streets the boys were led 

So through thy songs sweet mem'ries roam. 

Yet not more rugged than the oak 

Who loved the earth's immensity, 
And sought the freer moods to teach, 



When swayed by life's intensity. 
Of such deep truths, this poet writ 

In plainest verse, oft crude and hard ; 
Yet ever and anon he struck 

The human note that told the bard. 

While softly lingers on the air. 

The calmer note, the smoother rhyme 
Which calls to mind a mid-night ride 

That roused the minute-men in time, 
Or yet, mayhap, the scene is changed 

To where the hills in silence lay, 
As slowly to the exiled land 

Arcadia's flower sailed away. 

Wife of the one, beloved of all ; 

Fair singer from the mother-land, 
Thy "'Sonnets from the Portugese " 

Display the touch of master hand. 
Not since the Baird of Avon died 

Hath any dared essay the task, 
But thou hath left us uncut gems ; 

No sweeter songs could critic ask. 



ones. 



SOME NEW ARABIAN NIGHTS, 

THE EXTRAORDINARY ADVENTURES OF ABDUL MORAD. 

It was early in the brilliant reign of Haroun-al- 
Raschid, when Bagdad was resplendent with streamers 
and carpets, that Abdul Morad opened a small rug 
store in a short side street. All Persia was applauding 
the wisdom of the young monarch who dazzled his 
courtiers with his bon-mots and threw his political 
enemies into consternation by the subtlety of his 
statesmanship. 

Abdul Morad was as inconspicuous as Haroun-al- 
Raschid was prominent, and it would be hard to find 
within the walled city two beings so diametrically 
opposite in nearly every trait and characteristic. 
" Little Abdul," as he was affectionately called by his 
neighbors, pursued his peaceful occupation of selling 
rugs unmindful of the political strife that was all about 
him. He daily opened his shop and regularly sat in 
his window with his little red turban bobbing up and 
down as he would argue with a customer about the 
quality of some Daghestan or small prayer rug. 

Business had been pretty brisk and Abdul Morad 
was fairly started upon the road toward success when 
a series of events happened which changed the course 



of his life and brought him prominently before the 
people of Bagdad. Allah is undoubtedly good, yet his 
ways are inscrutable ; so " Little Abdul " thought, and 
certain events have since happened which greatly 
strengthened this belief. It matters little, gentlemen, 
whether you worship a Christian or a pagan god, the 
great mystery of life remains unsolved. 

But to return to the little rug dealer. One evening 
as it became dusk, Abdul Morad sat by his opened 
window reading his favorite " Rubaiyat," and he had 
reached that verse which runs somewhat in this 
manner : 

" Into this universe, and why not knowing 

Nor whence ; like water willy-nilly flowing ; 

And out of it, as wind along the waste; 

I know not whither, willy-nilly blowing." — 
when a yellow rose was thrown through the window at 
his very feet. Astounded by this unexpected happen- 
ing he was too slow to rise and scan the road, but 
when at last he did there was no one in sight and the 
latticed windows all along the street in front of his 
shop were securely closed. Taking one more scru- 
tinizing look up the street, Abdul Morad retraced his 
steps and picked up the rose that had now fallen upon 
the floor. For the first time he noticed a slender roll 
of paper fastened to the stem underneath the petals ; 
this he took off and unrolled. Upon this paper there 



J 



AGGIE LIFE. 



43 



was a short verse written in a pretty feminine style 
which caused the color to mount to the rug dealer's 
temples. With a hasty step he again went into the 
street and searched its dark corners for some clue to 
the mysterious messenger, but none could he find. 

After some hesitation and with many misgivings, 
Abdul Morad began to change his garments ; this he 
did with a peculiar nicety, selecting such colors that 
an observer of his actions would have said that there 
was a deep method in thus robing himself. When he 
had finished with the last jewel in his turban he plac- 
idly surveyed himself in the long glass. From his 
turban to his satin shoes he was all in yellow, and the 
rose, which had come to him as if sent by Heaven, 
adorned his jacket. In his pocket he placed a small 
poignard, and then with a last farewell look at his cos- 
tume he went out into the darkness. 

The evening was dark, and it promised to become 
very disagreeable as heavy clouds were gathering over- 
head : the wind, too, was rising and the mangy curs 
that infest the side streets were all of one accord 
seeking some manner of shelter. Every now and then 
" Little Abdul " would take the small roll of paper 
from his pocket and consult it ; sometimes he would 
hesitate at a street corner but always in these 
moments of indecision a reference to the paper would 
start him off down the road. 

He had gone in this manner for perhaps an hour, 
when he reached a house somewhat removed from its 
neighbors ; here he stopped and consulted his guide 
for the last time. Having satisfied himself that he 
had reached his destination at last, he boldly rapped 
upon the heavy door. At the third knock the door 
opened without any apparent assistance from within 
and showed a long, narrow, dimly-lighted passage way 
that stretched forth as far as the eye could see. This 
passage he entered and immediately afterward, the 
heavy door swung to with a loud noise, at the same 
time shutting off the cold night air which had been 
blowing down the narrow way. 

At first a chill of fear struck the very marrow of 
the rug dealer's bones as he realized that he was a 
prisoner. His first thoughts were of flight, but a vain 
attempt to open the closed door caused him to realize 
the futility of that scheme ; so putting on a bold 
defiant manner he strode down the passage as fast as 
he could go. At the farther end was another door, 



and the Persian was about to knock when the door 
opened and a heavy hand, catching him by the shoul- 
der, dragged him into a perfectly dark room. Then 
he was blindfolded and his hands securely tied behind 
his back. 

After some moments of indecision, his guide 
grasped him by the arm and led him across the room 
to where a heavy portiere concealed an archway. 
As soon as " Little Abdul " reached the door, he 
became conscious of the sound of music, at first faint 
and indistinct, but gradually increasing in strength and 
volume. Then the curtain was drawn aside and two 
gentle hands led him into what he imagined was a 
well-lighted room. There he was placed on a raised 
dais, his hands untied but eyes still closely bandaged, 
and the music continued, coming from whence he 
could not tell, in the soft cadences of an old Persian 
love song. 

Beside him, seated upon the same dais, there was 
a woman, whom he could not see ; but he was dimly 
conscious of the rustle of a silk dress, and once her 
arm rubbed against his as if by some accident. The 
absurdity of the situation occurred to Abdul and he 
could not refrain from laughing aloud, Then he was 
closely bandaged, unable to see the first thing, but al 
the time he was conscious that an elaborate entertain- 
ment was being performed about him. The music 
gave place to dancing and that again to singing of the 
sweetest order. 

After the entertainment, an elaborate collation was 
served, the attendants bringing the choicest viands to 
the two seated upon the dais ; then when all had been 
refreshed the dancers began to disperse and the two 
mute figures remained alone. 

For some moments the Persian sat still, not daring 
to move, until the rustle of his partner's dress dis- 
turbed him and he reached across and touched her 
arm. Together they descended carefully to the ball- 
room floor, when after much groping about, the rug- 
dealer found a door which he could open. Throwing 
it back, he called to the woman but she did not 
respond, and he looked back to find her when the door 
swung to, shutting him into the long passage-way. 
Disgusted with his ill luck, he endeavored to remove 
the bandage but without success ; this he had tried 
once before unsuccessfully so now he slit it with his 
poignard. 



44 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Slowly and painfully he groped his way along, 
poignard in hand, until he came to the outer door. 
At first he was afraid that it was closed, but a ray of 
light came through the casement and it was not long 
before he had opened the door and stepped out into 
the street. 

No sooner had he placed a foot upon the flagging 
than several men, who had been standing in the dark 
corners, set upon him and severely beat him with 
staves and clubs. With a cry the Persian sank upon 
the pavement unconscious, his turban smirched with 
mud, his jewels gone and his long robes torn and 
tattered. The street cleaners found the poor rug- 
dealer when they made their early rounds and care- 
fully picked him up and carried him home. For 
months the shop-keeper lay abed, lingering between 
life and death, but at last Allah was kind and once 
again Abdul Morad was to be seen sitting in his win- 
dow, talking with his customers or reading his beloved 
Khayyam. 

The story of these adventures gradually spread all 
over Bagdad, and much speculation was rife as to 
what the society was that Abdul had visited, or where 
its rooms were located. The search for the isolated 
house was fruitless, nor could the rose or paper be 
found anywhere, and gradually people began to hint 
quite plainly that Abdul must be Insane. When this 
theory became prevalent, crowds came to visit the 
rug-dealer and talk with him on his adventures so that 
the insanity theory acted as an excellent advertise- 
ment for the little fellow, and Abdul Morad rather 
encouraged it. 



When the Persian dealer had finished, the Poet 
spoke up and asked if he might not read to us 
" The Legend of the Valley Beautiful." 

[To be continued.] 

F. A. M. 



Football f^eWWs. 



M. A. C, 36: Storrs, 0. 
The game between M. A. C. and Storrs Agricul- 
tural College which was played on the campus Nov. 6, 
resulted in a victory for the home team by a score of 
36 to 0. Great interest was manifested in this con- 
test because of its being the first game that Aggie 
has played in the State college series, The students 



were agreeably surprised at the good showing made 
by the team. 

Storrs won the toss and chose the north goal. 
Eaton kicked off to the twenty yard line. Storrs 
advanced the ball ten yards but lost it on 
downs. Barry was sent through left tackle for ten 
yards and Walker circled right end for a touchdown 
only a few minutes after the game was called. Eaton 
failed to kick a difficult goal. Score 4 to 0. Webb 
kicked to Dorman who was downed on Aggie's 35 
yard line. On the next play Storrs' secured the ball 
on a fumble but was unable to gain. By a series of 
rushes through the guards and the tackles the ball was 
carried up the field until Eaton scored a touchdown. 
He failed to kick the goal. Score, 8 to 0. Webb again 
kicked off and M. A. C. was on her way to another 
touchdown when time was called. 

In the second half Storrs seemed to weaken while 
Aggie braced up and played good football. Webb 
kicked to Rogers who advanced the ball five yards. 
Then Aggie succeeded in making gains through 
tackle and around the end until Barry was pushed 
over for a touchdown. Eaton kicked the goal making 
the score 14 to 0. Aggie, by a number of fast rushes 
secured her fourth touchdown. The goal was kicked 
by Eaton. Score, 20 to 0. Soon after the ball was 
kicked off. Walker made a pretty run of forty yards, 
carrying the ball to Storrs' five yard line from which 
Eaton tore through tackle for a touchdown. He 
kicked the goal. Score, 26 to 0. Webb kicked off 
to Parmenter who was downed in his tracks. On 
hard rushes by Crowell, Rogers, and Walker, the 
ball was again pushed across the goal. Score, 32 to 
0. The pigskin was once more planted behind the 
goal posts, on gains by Crowell, Barry and Walker. 
Eaton failed to kick the goal. Score, 36 to 0. 

For M. A. C. Walker played an excellent game 
while Webb of Storrs played gritty ball. 

The summary : 

M. A. C. , Storrs 

Gile, Baker, r. e. 1. e. Lyman 

Eaton, r. t. 1. t. Miner 

Cooke, r. g. 1. g. Pettie 

Parmenter, c. c. Gillette 

Stanley, 1. g. r. g. Clark 

Beaman, 1. t. r. t. Hoadley 

Walker, 1. e. r. e. Harvley 

Dorman, q. b. q. b. Onthrup 

Crowell. r' h. b. 1. h. b. Mansfield 

Rogers, 1, h. b. r. h. b. Craucis 

Barry, f. b. f. b. Webb, McKinney 

Score — M. A. C. 36, Storrs. Touchdowns — Barry 2, 
Walker 2, Eaton 2. Crowell. Goals from tonchdowns — 

Eaton 4. Referee — Donnel, Storrs. Umpire — Lull, Amherst. 
Linesmen — -Hunter, Storrs and Turner '99. Time — 20 and 
25 minute halves. 



AGGIE LIFE. . 



45 



^o"fes and ^ommfn-ts. 



At present there seems to be In college too much 
of what may be called a spirit of mischief. Fun is 
fun ; but what a student looks upon as a practical joke 
may appear far different to others. So students 
should beware of pranks which injure others or cause 
somebody a great deal of labor and expense. As a 
rule these things are done thoughtlessly without stop- 
ping to consider the right and wrong of the matter. 
Now all these little pranks are noticed by people liv- 
ing outside of college, and stories, of little account at 
first, may eventually do irreparable injury. If the 
students will but remember that everything which has 
a tendency to wrong, no matter how slight, is a direct 
harm the Massachusetts Agricultural College which we 
all wish to see prosper, they will be more careful of 
their actions. Every mem.ber of this college is desir- 
ous of promoting its wellfare, and we must not forget 
that it is by looking out for every day occurrances that 
it will be most benefited. 

* 
As the football season is drawing to a close, and 
we look over the records, we can say that the team 
has played well and the men have done their best. 
Considering everything, we feel that we have reason 
to be proud of the work done this year. Although it 
was a great disappointment to many that the Univer- 
sity of Maine cancelled its game, we hope that an- 
other game may yet be arranged. The arrangement 
of games with large colleges has had a good result 
this year. It is better to be beaten in a good game 
by some first-class college eleven than to win over 
some fourth-rate scrub team. We wish to commend 
the Freshmen for the way they have come out to 
practice. For the last few weeks they have had a 
second team out for the practice and support of the 
regular team. This has been a great help to the col- 
lege eleven and more than this it has been developing 
men who will be able to get into the game next year. 
If football continues to improve next year as rapidly 
as it has this, Aggie will not be without honors on the 
gridiron. 

* 
The series of soil tests which was instituted here 
last June by Professor Whitney, chief of the Division 



of Soils of the United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, has closed for this year. The tests made this 
year cover only a period of four months commencing 
July 1, but it is the intention of Professor Whitney to 
continue the work next year beginning earlier in the 
season. The object of the tests is to determine the 
effect of the moisture and temperature of the soil 
upon the growth of corn. To this end the moisture 
and temperature of both the soil and the air have 
been taken three times daily and the daily growth of 
the corn has been carefully noted. Several similar 
experiments planned by Professor Whitney have been 
carried on this year in different places in the United 
States so as to give results from all parts of the 
country. 



—Out of jail 1 

— Sophs, free once again. 

— Drills off, probation off. 

— Did the team go to Maine ? Nit. 

— The freshmen are going to get sweaters. 

— R. D. Warden '98 is singing in the College 
choir. 

— Paul, 1901, has got a hair cut. There ought to 
be others. 

- — Gordon and Bridgeforth of the freshman class 
have joined the C. S. C. 

The charm of fair weather has been broken at last 
and the dust has been settled for keeps. 

— A. M. Kramer, '96, spent a few days last week 
in visiting College and renewing old acquaintances. 

■ — The well-known sophomore quartet still makes 
its weekly trips to " Pratt's Corner," renowned for 
cider. 

— Rev. Mr. Skinner of Amherst did not fill our pul- 
pit Nov. 7, as first planned, but will preach Nov. 21 
instead. 

— For particulars respecting laboratory for physics 
and practical work in same for junior class consult 
Prof. Hasbrouck. 

— The efforts to get a game with Bowdoin for next 
Saturday were unsuccessful as Bowdoin already had a 
game for that date. 



46 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The first snow storm of the season occurred last 
Thursday night when about half an inch of snow fell. 

— If the men in North College are patient perhaps 
they may be able to use the new bath-rooms by the 
first of our next College year. 

— Dr. Rolfe and Professors Mills and Babson of 
the English department of this College have accepted 
honorary membership in the College Shakespearean 
Club. 

— At a recent Faculty meeting it was voted to 
release the sophomore class from probation, and to 
excuse the remaining extra drill. Who pulled the 
wires ? 

— The first Kneipe of the K. K. K, was held at the 
boarding-house on the evening of Nov, 3rd. Besides 
the students in Chemistry several resident alumni 
were present. 

— Dr. William J. Rolfe of Cambridge, the Shake- 
spearean scholar, gave a very interesting talk upon, 
" Shakespeare, the Man" to the College Shakespear- 
ean Club on the evening of October 22. 

— The sophs, have decided to get white sweaters 
with the class numbers interwoven in maroon in 
front. The sweaters will be of extra fine quality and 
will no doubt do much to further college and class 
enthusiasm. 

— Let somebody get a hustle and start up the N. 
H. S. Everybody seems to want to have a course 
of lectures similar to those of previous years. Where 
are the old officers? Why don't they call a rfieeting, 
elect officers and get to work ? 

— The senior class cane committee has on exhibi- 
tion some sample canes such as the class were in 
favor of getting and the general opinion of the class 
in regard to them is that of satisfaction. W. H. Har- 
rison of New York city is supplying the canes. 

— At the second meeting of the Fernald Entomo- 
logical club Thursday, Oct. 27, Mr. W. W. Stevens 
addressed the club. His subject " The Coloration of 
Insects " proved of considerable interest. At the next 
meeting Mr. A. N. Caudell will speak on the 
" Branched Hairs of Insects." 

— Last Wednesday afternoon the freshman class 
football team beat the Sunderland eleven by the close 
score of 6-0. The freshman team was weakened by 



the absence of several regular players, who went 
down to Pratt Field with the " Varsity," but they were 
bound to win, and win they did. 

— Among the visitors at the College last week was 
Pres't M. McSouth of the North Dakota Agricultural 
College. Prof. Chas. E. Coats of the Louisiana Agri- 
cnltural and Mechanics Arts college, and the commit- 
tee appointed by Board of Agriculture to report on the 
experimental department of the College. 

— Perhaps our boys would be interested in looking 
at the estimated expenses of the Alcorn A. and M_ 
college of Miss. Tuition free to all Mississippi stu- 
dents, for others $5.00 per term ; Doctor's fee per 
year $2.50 ; board and washing per month $5.00 ; 
use of furniture per year $1.00 ; contingent fund per 
year: $1.50. (Ciieap at half the price.) 

— On November 5, Rev. Calvin Stebbins delivered 
his first lecture "The Puritan Poet John Milton," in 
the Chapel. His very interesting and instructive lec- 
ture was enjoyed by a large audience. The follow- 
ing lecture in this course, "John Milton and the Pur- 
itan Epic, Paradise Lost," was delivered last Monday 
evening to a large and appreciative audience. 

— Probably the readers of Aggie Life have noticed 
that no list of the names of the members of the enter- 
ing class has been published in our columns. Such a 
list would be very uninteresting to anybody not 
acquainted personally with the new men. Therefore 
as the '99 Index will soon be ready with a complete 
list of all the men in every class, we feel no need of 
putting their names in our columns. 

— On November 10 our football team played a 
practice game with Amherst's eleven and was beaten 
by the score of 34-0. The idea of the game was to 
bring out the weak points of each team, before the 
league games and each team had coachers on 
the field. Nearly all of Amherst's touchdowns 
resulted from long runs around the ends. Amherst 
v/as not strong in bucking the line and quite often 
Aggie secured the ball on downs, but soon lost it again 
in the same manner. Our team was weak on end 
plays and stronger on bucking the line, while Amherst 
seemed to be just the opposite. 

— It is a matter of sincere regret to every M. A. C. 
student that the League of New England State Col- 
leges seem to be falling to pieces even before it is 



AGGIE LIF^E. 



47 



really an established fact. Our first surprise was in 
hearing New Hampshire declare that she did not 
belong to the League. But we were more surprised 
and disappointed to receive a letter from Maine 
expressing regret that very unfavorable circumstances 

1 made it impossible for her to meet us. We were 
particularly anxious to meet Maine as no doubt the 
teams would be evenly matched and the contest a hot 
one. Maine would in ail probability be first of the two 
northern states (Vermont is not in the league) while 
Massachusetts besides easily beating New Hamp- 
shire, has clearly shown her superiority over Connec- 
ticut and Rhode Island. Hence if the league had held 
together the championship would lie between Maine 
and Massachusetts, the loser getting second place in 
the league standing. 

— Quite a bit of improving has recently been going 
at the Botanical Department. A new ditch has been 
opened up through the little ravine north of Dr. 
Brook's house, where the old water course was com- 
pletely filled with sand and gravel. At a little distance 

l from the foot of the steep pitch the brook enters a 
stone culvert which conducts the water by the horse- 
barn and between the tool-house and Botanical labo- 
ratory to the gutter of the street by Prof. Maynard's. 
Owing to the extension of the Botanical laboratory a 
new walk will have to be made leading to Prof. May- 
nard's. This walK will be directly over the stone cul- 
vert. Several trees on the East side of the Botanical 
laboratory have been cut down in order to give the 
laboratory m.ore light. Being surrounded by buildings 
as that corner is, the shadows of the dense pines made 
it a decidedly gloomy spot, and it is a relief to let a 
little daylight into that quarter. Several important 
changes have also been made in the green-houses. 
The roof of the first octagon of the lower house has 
been raised and altered so that it is symmetrical with 
the second octagon. At the upper house one large 
roof has replaced the two low roofs, making one house 
of what formerly was practically two houses. This 
new arrangement admits more sunlight and gives the 
plants more room. 



TO A SUMMER SIREN. 



Her eyes are like unfathomable lakes 
O'er which the radiant dawn in gladness breaks. 

And yet the mariner had best beware, 

For many a heart lies wrecked and sunken there. — Ex. 



urrxni. 



'71.— L. A. Nichols, Agent for Power Plants, 327 
Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

74. — John M. Benedict and wife were in town 
recently. Mr. Benedict was on the famous crew 
which won at Ingleside. 

'77. — Raunudo M. de Porto, Director Para Muse- 
um of Natural History and Entomology, Para, Brazil. 

'78. — Horace E. Stockbridge is now Professor of 
Agriculture in the Florida State College. 

'82. — John A. Cutter has recently given to the 
library seventy or eighty medical works. 

'82. — Charles E. Beach and wife were in town 
recently. 

'82. — C. D. Hillman, Address Fresno City, Cal. 

'85. — Edwin W. Allen and wife made a recent visit 
in town. 

'85. — Charles S. Phelps and wife of Conn, were at 
the College one day last week. 

'85. — The last number of the New York Medical 
Record contained an abstract of a paper by Dr. Joel 
E. Goldthwait of Boston on the " Treatment of 
Deformities of the Knee Resulting from Tumor 
Albus." This paper was read at the Congress of 
American physicians and surgeons held in Washing- 
ton, D. C, May 4, 5, 6, 1897. 

'88. — W. M. Shepardson, landscape gardner. 
Address, Middlebury, Conn. 

'88. — R. B. Moore, chemist for Brookline Fertili- 
zer Co. Address 324 1-2 Franklin St., Elizabeth, 
N. J. 

'90._Dwight W. Dickinson with Dr. Abbott, 14 
Vose Strasse, Berlin, Germany (dentist). 

'93. — John R. Perry and wife made a short stop in 
town last week. 

'93. — Dr. H. F. Staples, of Solon. Ohio, announces 
the birth of a son upon Oct. 22, 1897. 

'93. — Francis T. Harlow. Address Mansfield, 
Mass. 

'94. — A recent number of the London Chemical 
News contains an article by Dr. Claude F. Walker of 
Yale University, reprinted from the American Journal 
of Science. 



48 



AGGIE LIFE. 



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Established 1845. Tel. 2423. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the stutlent trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, larccst and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HAUL.. 



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which Columbia 
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PHOTOGRAPHIG STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A.. J. <SOEIIIvX-<..^I«e:, 

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Telephone connection. 



COA.Iv. 



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OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

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Work Guaranteed or money refunded. Give us a trial 



102 Main St., opp. Court House, 
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OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

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REAL ESTATE EOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer , 

To the class of '97 M. A. C. MAKES A SPECIALTY 
OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 

E. K. BENNETT 

Jeweler, 
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First door from Post Office. 

FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
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AGGIE i^IFK. 



C. S. GAIES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BROWiS^, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS. 

Cutler's Block, . . - - Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered wlien desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 

Wrmmiimml Wtmm^'mr, 

STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 




HAtFi^NfPtATESi 



■^ DESIGNING, ETC. 



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ffiassaehasetts flgfieulttical College. 

AT THE 

COLLISGE FiLRM 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



3 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
Eor information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 




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Office Hours : 

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Ether and Nix'ons Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



Liverv arid Feed Stable, 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE 

PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FPNE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A EULL LINE OF 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



ItS" Repairing done tvJiile yoii wait,„SjS 



2 PSCENIX MOW. 



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273 Hain St., 



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^^BEST MEALS SERVED IN NORTHAMPTON 
GIVE US A CALL. 



M. N. SPEAR, 

Bool(S6llei', Stationer and Newsdealer. 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT ano SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

HEADQUA RTERS FOR AGGIE STUDENTS. 

H^IR DRESSIM G ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONED, barbers' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

:E=:E3:..^I^:^/C^u.oIST. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and nlglit calls responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

* Go-Operative Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establisliment, 



A^g;g;ie> .A.g;^XTLt, 



fi. ^.^rHtion'x' »os 



Get Sample Rates for Wasliing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

s<^s:SA^msFjf^ciTioTsr c3-xjA.H,A.i>rTEEr3, a>S^ 
Office : 
Next Doge West of Amity St. School House.- 




its 



PALMER'S BLOCK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT CONFECTIONERY, 

AND CIGARS AT LOWEST 

PRICES. 

g^^GOODS DELIVERED FREE...,^ 

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Aggie life. 




You will be interested in the new Stearns year book. Among other 
things it gives full details of the wonderful new chainlesB Yellow Fellow. 




fM, 



" All Yellow wheels are either Stearns bicyles or imitations." 
Write now for agent's terms. 



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AMHERST, MASS. 

of work I'liaranteed, 



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No, 2 Cook's Block, 

first Class HsiP Cutting and Shaving. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBER'S SUPPLIES 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

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Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



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Over 4,000 vacancies. Faithful service guaranteed. Book 
with free plans, 10 cents. Blanks free. Address, 

Southern Teachers' Bureau, Louiscille, Kg. 



MASS,>GRICULTOI[AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

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VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST, MASS.. DECEMBER 15, 1897, 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 

Terms $1.00 per year in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Randall D. Warden. '98, Editor-in-Chief. 

Alexander Montgomery, Jr., '98, Business Manager. 

Frederick H. Turner, '99, Ass't Business Manager. 
George H. Wright, '98. Willis S. Fisher, '98. 

Avedis G. Adjemian, '98. Warren E. Hinds, '99. 
WilHann H. Armstrong, '99. Charles A. Crowell, Jr., '00. 
George F. Parmenter, '00. James E. Halligan, '00. 



Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed to Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 

Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



^V,^ftX^TtV V Vv!JV,tV.O\i^'t^ ^»\WA%*5. 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Athletic Association, 
Foot-Ball Association, 
Base-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 
Ninety-Nine Index, 



W. S. Fisher, Pres. 

J. S. Eaton, Sec. 

R. D. Warden, Manager. 

J. R. Dutcher, Manager. 

J. P.Nickerson, Sec, 

J. S. Eaton, Manager. 

J. R. Dutcher, Manager. 



£cli'tor!als. 



KOMMERS ! 



The Kommerswas a grand success. The students 
attended in a body, not so the professors. To those 
who joined in the spirit of the occasion and attended, 
we express our deepest gratitude. 



Of late, class sweaters have blossomed upon the 
campus like rose buds in the rose-room of the Col- 
lege green-houses. The Sophomores have adopted a 
white sweater with '00 in maroon ; while the naughty 
" bad ones " wear the orange upon the color of old Ire- 
fand. Both sweaters are natty and are bound to be 
a success if only as a mark by which the good buds 
may be picked out from the bad ! 



We have now had our Kommers, next term the 
Military Ball must be made a success, and we trust 
that those who have so ably engineered the former, 
will not be less enthusiastic in pushing the latter. 
Without cooperation between the students and faculty, 
success cannot be acquired and although causing some 
inconvenience and exertion upon the part of those 
kind enough to entertain, still we feel sure that their 
kindness is fully appreciated by the students. Little 
things of this kind leave upon the memory pleasant 
recollections of College days. 



Now that the football season is over why not make 
arrangements to form a basket ball team to repre- 
sent this college. In all of our colleges of to-day this 
branch of athletics plays a very important part. It is 
a very interesting and scientific game, and one in 
which the physical requirements are more adapted to 
the average man. If a team were formed games 
could be arranged with several of the college teams, 
and possibly with the teams representing the New 
England State Colleges. In order to form a good 
team it might be well to arrange a series of games 
between the classes, and to award the champion class 
team a prize or banner. These games would cer- 
tainly arouse interest, and would give everyone a fair 
show for the team. 



Until the present time our work in Physics has 
been greatly handicapped by having no laboratory, but 
this year sees a change, and no mean one either. 
Pres't Goodell always ready for an improvement is 
going to give up his recitation room for the new labo- 
ratory and in the future the President's room will be 
the room in the chapel adjoining the Y. M. C. A. 
room. On the east side of the laboratory will be a 
working table fifteen feet long, with a sink in the mid- 
dle. Gas and water pipes will be conveniently stowed 



56 



AGGIE Life. 



away under the table when not in use, and the sink 
covered. There will be two benches twenty-four 
inches wide on both the north and west sides of the 
room. The window on the south side of the room 
will be fitted with a port-lumiere, a screen on the 
northeast corner of the room will catch the shadow. 
The shutters of the east windows will slide up or down 
in response to a pair of hydrostatic stop-cocks on the 
table. The other windows will have tight fitting shut- 
ters that turn on hinges. In the room below there 
will be a small dynamo run by a water motor. The 
power of the dynamo will be 52 volts, 10 amperes, 
sufficient to run a 1200 c. arc lamp. The electricity 
will be carried by wires to a switch on the east side 
of the laboratory, where it can be connected with any 
apparatus desired. Among other things there will be 
a system of storage batteries, twelve or fifteen seventy- 
five ampere hour cells. Students will be required to 
be familiar with the different galvanometers, the Tan- 
gent, D'Arsonval,and Ballistic, and be able to determine 
the reduction factor of each, by various methods in 
use. The effect of the different arrangement of cells, 
determination of resistance, practical working of the 
Wheatstone bridge etc., will be thoroughly taken up. 
Preliminary work in static electricity will be given 
some attention. Alternating currents will not be 
studied much, but if a man wishes a good general 
idea of electricity, or to lay a strong foundation for 
more advanced study he has an excellent opportunity. 



KOMMERS. 

The third Kommers given at the M. A. C. was held 
Friday evening, Dec. 10, at the dining hall of the 
Boarding Club. The room was very prettily deco- 
rated with palms, ferns, and potted plants. At the 
tables, which were profusely decorated with cut 
flowers, were seated those assembled, without regard 
to arrangement by classes. It was not, however, a 
typical German "Kneipe" as the two preceding 
ones had been; the Saour Krout, sausages, etc., 
being dispensed with and instead a turkey supper was 
served. 

At eight o'clock the professors, alumni and students 
who had been flocking to the Boarding House, were 
called to order by Professor Wellington, who, acting 
as toastmaster, opened the evening with a few 
explanatory remarks. 



He was followed by Dr. Paige who gave a very 
interesting illustrated lecture upon his recent tour 
through Holland and Germany. He was assisted by 
Prof. Flint, who manipulated the stereopticon. 

The lecture began with a very picturesque descrip- 
tion of the Steamship leaving New York, the trip 
across the Atlantic and the welcome sight of land 
when Holland was reached. 

After a brief description of the Geography of the 
country, the manner of reclaiming land from the sea 
was described. Huge wind-mills, some with arms 
sixty feet long, dot the country in every direction, 
pumping water from the low reclaimed land into rivers 
and canals which wind in and out through the country. 
These canals are used for transportation and drainage 
and some of them are very expensive. 

The fact that the women of the lower class act as 
hod-carriers and do menial labor is a point of interest 
to Americans. 

Very few horses are used in Holland ; large dogs 
driven by women haul milk-carts here and there about 
the streets. 

In Germany, large Breweries are found scattered 
throughout the country and are usually of interest to 
travellers. 

The language is rather difficult to become accus- 
tomed to, the verbs especially. An Englishman 
travelling through the country said that he would 
rather decline two beers than one German verb. 

Leaving the country of Scweitzerkase and Frank- 
finterwrust, we come back to our America. 

After this interesting lecture had been finished, 
about one hundred sat down to the repast furnished by 
the committee. 

Supper over, singing was indulged in for a while, 
when Prof. Wellington announced that Mr. Rice, the 
humorist of the freshman class would favor the com- 
pany with a recitation. He responded with a very 
witty selection and gave another in return to the 
hearty applause which was given him. 

Songs came next, followed by Dr. Lindsey who was 
greeted with loud applause. The Doctor told some 
very amusing stories which met the approval of those 
assembled. More singing, then a speech by Dr. 
Flint. 

The singing of " There'll be a Hot Time in the 
Hash House to-night " came next, followed by Prof. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



SI 



Babson with stories in Irish dialect. 

Some selections by Canto and Kellogg, mandolins, 
Henry, guitar followed. 

After singing " America " and giving the College 
yell the assembly broke up, after having passed a very 
enjoyable evening. 

H. J. M. 



THE CHARACTER OF MILTON'S SATAN. 

Upon Friday evening, Nov. 19. Rev. Calvin Steb- 
bins delivered the last of his three lectures upon Milton. 
His subject was, •' The Character of Milton's Satan." 

The question is often asked, "Who was the hero of 
Paradise Lost ? " There are but few characters in 
the poem, and there is great diversity of opinion upon 
this point. Milton was an idealist, and his conception 
of Satan illustrates the tone and temper of his mind. 

Lucifer, who held great position and power in 
Heaven, was consumed with envy and jealousy 
because the Son of God was crowned King. • He 
called his subjects together and unfolded to them his 
plans for waging war upon the throne and authority of 
God. All of that vast host followed him but the youth- 
ful angel Abdiel. Michael, the heavenly warrior led 
forth the army of God against the rebels. The fight 
was desperate, but God sent this Son to take com- 
mand the third day and Satan and his followers were 
driven to the ends of Heaven and plunged into chaos. 
Hell, yawning, received them and they sank into the 
lake of fire. Satan first recovered consciousness. 
Milton represented him as being of enormous pro- 
portions. There was nothing vulgar or common about 
him. He had no horns or cloven hoof or forked tail. A 
council of the evil spirits was then held in Pandemonium 
to discuss their future plans. Several plans were sug- 
gested, but that of Beelzebub, that they seize the new 
world and add it to the domains of Hell, met with the 
most favor. Satan himself volunteered to explore the 
utter darkness and discover the new world. After 
overcoming many obstacles he came in sight of our 
earth hung by a golden chain from Heaven, " In big- 
ness as a star." He made his way to Paradise and 
there matured his plans for the destruction of Man. 
He heard Adam and Eve talk of the forbidden tree. 
Finally he entered into the mouth of a serpent, and 
talked with Eve and persuaded her to pluck and eat of 
the fruit of the forbidden tree. Then he soared back 



to Hell, and sent Sin and Death to make man their 
prey. 

Milton's conception of Satan was grandly infernal. 
Intellectually he was a giant, a splendid orator, and a 
great inventive genius. Jealousy, envy and revenge 
were his traits of character, and no devil is without 
them. He considered that the world was created out 
of spite for him, and that man was the new favorite of 
God. Thus man became the object of his revenge. 
His courage is his most attractive attribute. His was 
the top of courage, it was Satanic. But there are two 
kinds of courage; one is the child of the perverted will, 
the other that of moral principle. Satan's was infe- 
rior to that of Abdiel, the youthful angel who opposed 
his will. When he arose from the burning lake, 
racked with deep despair, he was soon master of him- 
self and he showed no weakness. His ambition was 
great. " Better to reign in Hell than to serve in 
Heaven," he said. His only consolation was in a 
depraved will. He had become perverse by his own 
choice, and had brought ruin upon himself and millions. 

What is the meaning and significance of this char- 
acter? In Paradise Lost, Milton teaches these 
truths. The soul that sinneth shall die. No strength, 
be it Satanic, can grow without knowledge of God. 
Sin is weakness and greater weakness. An angel may 
become a brute physically, mentally and morally. 
Then who is the hero? Milton never thought of a 
hero. If it had been asked of him, he would probably 
have replied in the words of Cromwell, " Sir, this is 
no other but the hand of God, and to him alone 
belongs the glory." c. n. b. '98. 



IN MEMORY OF 

GILPIN BROOKS WOODBREY, 

DIED NOV. 1, 1897. 

It has seemed good to an All-wise Father to take from this 
world, Gilpin Brooks Woodbrey, whose death we all mourn. 
Those of us who were associated with him as college mates, 
classmates, as fellow members of the College Shakespearean 
Club learned to love him for his genial friendly disposition 
and to admire him for qualities of mind and temperament 
which promised well for his future. We deeply sympathize 
with the bereaved family in our common affliction. His 
memory will always be lovingly cherished by the members 
of the fraternity. 

For the Graduate Association of the C. S. C., 
Joseph B. Lindsey, ~] 
Claude F. Walker, [Executive 
Benjamin K. Jones, [Committee. 
Henry M. Thomson. J 
Amherst, Mass., Nov. 22, 1897. 



52 



AGGIE LIFE. 



A^^lc Verj^, 



THE FIRST LOVE. 

Two pictures, 

One — divinely fair, 

The other — a soldier boy, 

Had lain away, 

Side by side, 

For many a year 

In a cabinet drawer. 

One picture 

Ah ! of beauty rare, 

A nnaiden — demurely coy. 

With dark brown eyes 

And darker hair, 

Had the magical power 

Of infinite grace. 

The other 

One — a soldier boy. 

Was dimmed— the marks of time 

Left but a trace 

Of the strength, 

And the dashing grace. 

I once knew was there. 

Memories 

Rise — 1 live again 

In a dream — the long ago 

Passes before 

In a shadow, 

Rapidly chasing 

The day dreams of youth. 

Years ago. 

Yes, I can recall 

The story — but faintly now — 

Of those faces. 

Boy and girl, 

I knew of their joy. 

And of how they loved. 

I wonder 

If, in the years 

That have fled, the girl yet lives ; 

And whether she 

Still remembers 

Those days of old, 

Or, is she dead. 

Fifty years 

Now, have passed away. 

These pictures I found to-day 

Have a tale 

I long to tell. 

And yet — methinks — 

I will put them back 

In the drawer 

Again. 

Lie there old friends — 

Some future time I may return ; 

And in fond remembrance 

Your youth, again. 

Will spread a balm 

O'er my declining years. 



CHRISTMAS REVERIES. 
The Yule log burns upon the hearth, 

And throws its ruddy glare about, 
While drifts the snow against the pane 

And all is cold and white without. 

I draw my chair beside the fire 

Where sputter baking apples ripe, 
And lay aside my well-thumbed book. 

To fill again my old clay pipe. 

On every Christmas, after dark, 

My faithful Briarwood and I 
Will sit before the blazing logs 

And dream of happier days gone by. 

With every puff of fragrant smoke 

That curls aloft in silent wreaths. 
There come sweet memories of all 

The many joys that Love bequeaths. 

We dream of old Monadnock grim. 
And how we roamed its rugged sides ; 

Of how we tracked the running hare. 
Or roused the partridge where she hides. 

Or when, in sadder mood or time. 

We wandered through the solemn wood, 

Until amid cathedral pines 
In reverential awe we stood. 

Then back across the frozen brook. 

Where, fresh from school, the children skate ; 
Up the long road that marks the north. 

And home again for supper late. 

What scoldings did we both get then, 

That poor old weary dog and I ! 
And how we yearned to sit and watch 

In perfect calm the western sky. 

Then, when the air would not permit 
Our distant rambles through the bogs, 

When snow would hide the distant hills, 
We sought the blazing fire-dogs. 

There, when the girls had gone to bed, 

Their faces ruddy with the play. 
We sat in peace with all the world, 

That even of our Christmas day. 

Then, thoughts of those small ones in bed, 
The jewels four, fatigued by play. 

Would come to mind amid the smoke 
And chase the sorrows of the day. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



53 



And with their youthful laughter came, 
A face of more mature years ; 

With eyes of tender sympathy, 

Where love and kindly help appears. 

The rustle of her garment makes 

Sweet music through the gilded room. 

With every step her figure takes, 
Transcendent light dispels the gloom. 

Now seated at the harpsichord 
Her slender fingers idly stray, 

Until the unknown symphony 

Becomes the theme of Hghter lay. 

And " Moments Musical " is lost 
In cadences that sweetly fade 

Into the graceful touch and time 
Of Schubert's " Evening Serenade." 



les. 



FATHER JACINTH' S CHRISTMAS. 

Father Jacinth quietly paced up and down his Htte 
garden plot, whence the dead poppy plants and the 
naked holly-hock stems pushed their withered leaves 
through the light fall of snow. The little garden was 
the sole spot that the father could call his own, outside 
of his cosy library where his tattered books and hard 
seated chairs formed his only mental solace. 

The parish over which Father Jacinth presided was 
very poor, but the good old priest loved his children 
as he loved his duty. There never was a moment 
when the best interests of his church were separated 
from his thoughts, every scheme, however simple, 
that the old man could devise for the aid of his daily 
religion, claimed his best efforts, His whole heart 
was encompassed by that meagre, cold, stone chapel 
which was the butt of the sweeping winds that rushed 
across the dreary wastes of the unclaimed meadow 
lands, and he was seldom happy when away from his 
beloved flock. 

The house in which Father Jacinth lived was as 
meagre in appointments as it could possibly be. The 
thatched roof covered but a one story structure of 
three rooms ; one of which was a kitchen and dining- 
room combined, another a sleeping room, and the 
third was the priest's working room or library. The 
walk to the church was short, which favored the good 
man as he had now reached that age when an extra 
step is very fatiguing. 



Father Jacinth had been educated in the best 
schools of his religion, and had offered, as a young 
man, a life full of promise and hope. He had com- 
pleted a very difficult course in theology and his 
thesis on "The Natural Order of Religious Doctrines" 
had bespoken him high praise. His future life 
would be well cared for by his superiors, and, so 
many of his fellows said, Father Jacinth would some 
day become a prominent archbishop ; perhaps, even a 
cardinal. 

Then followed a few years of glorious work and 
achievements ; of ambitious and noble aspirations ; 
to be followed by an order of transferral to a larger and 
more important field of work. All the world seemed 
opening like a new bud that is soon to become a full 
blown rose, sweet in fragrance and beautiful to view. 
Those fellows who had followed the young student 
in his day of toil, stood aghast before the progress of 
the man ; there seemed no feat too difficult for the 
young priest to attempt, no labor too severe to tax his 
mental and physical energies. He was the mainstay 
of his parishoners and a very refuge of consolation in 
time of trouble ; his face was seen amid the rich and 
poor alike ; his heart seemed to grasp the needs of all 
sorts and conditions of men, and his voice was ever 
raised in defense of the oppressed. 

Thus, Father Jacinth built up for himself a reputation 
for love and holiness, and he became a particularly 
shining light of his church. His counsel was eagerly 
sought by his brothers and his words of wisdom were 
listened to attentively. 

Some years passed on, until one day, the congrega- 
tion of Father Jacinth's church was surprised to miss 
him from his accustomed place ; no longer the kneel- 
ing penitents heard his voice, no more would this kind 
Father deliver absolution. The archbishop one day 
had said, that Father Jacinth would retire to a small 
country parish, never again to speak to his loved ones. 
At first this created some consternation, but the 
belief became general that the good priest's health had 
broken and that he was seeking a much needed vaca- 
tion, and thus the matter rested until the general 
public forgot its benefactor and only a few of the 
priests more intimate friends knew of his whereabouts. 
These few fast friends would sometimes see an 
aged, bent form walking the country lanes with solemn 
steps, and they would go away with a sinking heart. 



54 



AGGiE Lli^c.. 



never to mention their sorrow. There was something 
inexplicable about the aged figure that was once so 
stately and so erect ; something forbidding about the 
slow measured tread that was once so light and so 
elastic. There was a mystery surrounding this man's 
life which they felt was apart from their friendship and 
which they dared not question. 

The haunted look that once possesed the features 
of Father Jacinth gradually gave place to a look of 
calm serenity as his tenure in the little country church 
increased with the lengthening years, and gradually 
came to have the same fond regard for his small 
country flock that he once had for his large city one, 
until his heart was so bound up in his new field that 
he could never part with it without racking the tender- 
est chords of his love. 

So, while the white-haired priest paced his garden, 
listening to the Christmas chimes, his soul was at 
peace with the world. His thoughts were pure and 
noble, his aspirations as lofty as ever, although his 
sphere of action was limited. 

On this Christmas day his god-son had promised to 
ride over and visit him, dine with him, perhaps, and 
then have a quiet smoke among his books. The 
thought pleased him, and he hurried to the house to 
see that Babette should make a perfect salad and 
that the linen should be of his best. 

It was not often that Armand could come and such 
outings were generally considered very important, so 
that he had to be in readiness for the occasion. The 
little niceties which a woman always brings into a 
home were lacking in the house of Father Jacinth, 
for Babette was very old and besides, she only came 
over once or twice a month to clean the house and 
set the old priest to rights, as she would put it. He 
had lived in the ssme three rooms for many years 
and the corners would get musty in spite of Babette's 
quick eye and deft fingers. 

It was near noon when Armand drove up to the 
cottage and Father Jacinth was in the garden, but no 
sooner were the horse's hoofs heard upon the road 
than the eager priest hastened to the gate to meet his 
" boy. " The meeting was affectionate in the extreme, 
yet there was a troubled look in Father Jacinth's eyes 
as he beheld a lady, who waited upon a horse without 
the gate. 

Armand noticed his embarrasment and hastened to 



aid his companion to alight, then turning to the priest, 
he said :— 

" Father, you expected only me to day, but I have 
brought another to share your repast, Do not fear, 
we shall not be critical and we have excellent appetites 
as we have ridden far. This, then, is Lione of whom 
I have so often written you. Have you no word of 
welcome for her?" 

As the priest looked up, the blood rose to his 
cheeks and the blowing wind waved his curls, but he 
over-came his perplexity, and extended his hand to 
Lione who eagerly grasped it. 

" My child," he said impressively, " you are indeed 
welcome. Such poor service as I may have is yours 
to command. Your services to Armand whilst he lay 
wounded I shall never be able to repay ; — but there, 
Armand, call Babette and place another plate." 

And with that the three entered the house together. 

The evening had proven cold and dreary and the 
small fire on the hearth furnished both heat and light 
for the litttle book-shelved room. The dinner had 
passed off much better than Father Jacinth had 
anticipated, and Lione had proven to be a most 
enjoyable companion. 

When the afternoon twilight had faded into the 
clear, cold,western sky, the three companions gathered 
about the library fire. Father Jacinth taking his large 
chair with Lione sitting beside his knee, while Arm- 
and sat back a little and yet kept within the warm 
glow. 

Lione sat intently watchingthe flickering sparks, her 
her deep brown eyes dreamingly picturing the court- 
ship started upon a bloody field of battle. 

The priest moved uneasily and then softly said ; — 

" Lione, what are you thinking about, my child?" 

" I was thinking of you father, and of Armand. I 
may call you father, may I not?" 

" Certainly my child, if it pleases you," said the 
priest huskily. 

" I was thinking of a story my mother told me 
before she died ; a story of her life. You know my 
mother died some time ago. Father Jacinth," 

" No, my child, I never knew your mother." 

" Yes, and the story is so pretty. When mother 
was quite young she was really the belle of her set, as 
we say now. She was very beautiful, I know that 



AGGIE LIFE. 



55 



because I have her picture in this locket. Well, she 
had many admirers but none for whom she cared 
until chance placed in her path a young priest, well 
educated and highly gifted. At first my mother was 
not attracted to this young man but as time went on 
she learned his sterling worth and honesty of char- 
acter. He was so different from the other men who 
were hovering about her ; he was noble and energetic, 
had high ideals, and above all was an indefatigable 
worker. A strong friendship sprang up between 
them which prospered for a short time but soon 
threatened to turn into that stronger passion called 
love. I do not see how any one could have failed to 
love my mother : she was so beautiful and kind : her 
every thought was for the benefit of some poor 
sufferer." 

" And was j'our mother's name Rosa, my child?" 
asked the priest. 

" Why yes," replied Lione, " Did you know her?" 

" I have heard of her," said Father Jacinth. 
" Please go on, you interest me." 

•' How strange that you should know of her," said 
Lione. "Well, as 1 said those two young people 
found that their passionate natures would not brook the 
bounds of a platonic friendship, and, as you know, it is 
wrong for a priest to think ot marriage, my mother 
decided that they must part. Oh, that night when 
they bade each other farewell ! I remember so well 
how my mother would speak of it : how the tears 
would come into her eyes even years after it had 
happened. I believe that my mother was never the 
same after that night. 

" The young priest offered to give up the cloth, to 
do anything she could ask if she would but become 
his wife. All his ambitions he would lay aside, all his 
plans so carefully studied and laid out, would be 
scattered to the winds at her bidding ; the world 
moved for him but in her eyes ; the music of her 
step was sweeter to his ears than the notes of the 
feathered songsters. And yet she remained inflexible ; 
she deemed it best for both that they should part and 
as he refused to leave the city she went away, nearly 
heartbroken at doing what she believed to be a sacred 
duty." 

" And the priest," said Armand. 

"My mother said, she learned afterward that he 
had given up his parish and retired to a sm^ll country 



village, where, she could not learn ; although, in 
after years when the wound had healed, she did her 
best to seek her young lover but it was of no avail, he 
had completely hidden himself in some wilderness. 
And do you know Father Jacinth, I wonder if that 
wound ever did heal 1 I think my poor mother never 
lost her love for that young priest. I know she revered 
him unto her dying day ; and she has taught me to 
love him as she did herself." 

The fire had nearly gone out, only the glowing 
coals warmed the hearth. Faint curls of blue smoke 
were wafted silently up the chimney by the light 
waves of air that circulated about the room. Lione 
gazed into the fire and then said dreamily : — 

" How queer it would be if you had been that priest. 
Father Jacinth, and my marriage to Armand was to 
atone in a manner for my mother's lost love. It 
would be so romantic, so sweet ; and I would dearly 
like it to be so, for then 1 could repay you and 
Armand for your great kindness." 

" I think I understand it all, my child," said the 
priest, and a tear stole down his cheek. " I think I 
understand it now." 

The evening bells were pealing out their last knell 
as Father Jacinth bent down and tenderly kissed 
Lione's waving hair. 

F. A. M. 



CAMP FIRE TALES. 

In a litte valley far back in the wilds of Maine, 
there were a number of men grouped in favorite atti- 
tudes around a camp-fire. It was one of those rugged 
scenes of backwoods life which can only be met with 
in the varied career of a lumberman. These men 
had been up the river cutting trees, and floating them 
down to the boom at the Stillwater, two miles below. 

Swinging an axe, all day is by no means light work, 
so after a hearty supper of dried beef and baked 
beans, one after another stretched himself out before 
the fire to enjoy a quite smoke and each other's con- 
versation. 

Hundreds of miles from any human habitation this 
handful of men(for there were not more than a dozen) 
had for each other a feeling which would not have 
been possible in well settled districts. For six months 
of the year they were practically in a little world of 
their own, and they had become accustomed to lounge 



56 



AGGIE LIFE. 



about the blazing fire in the evening, to talk over the 
probable happenings in the outside world, crack jokes 
and spin yarns. Of these latter every lumberman has 
a large stock from which he can draw and never spin 
himself out. As to the veracity of these stories 1 will 
leave the reader to judge for himself. 

On this particular evening, conversation having 
lagged a little, Jim Dole, the manager of the crew 
settled himself back into an easier position, crossed 
his legs, lit his pipe anew, and began thus : " You may 
talk about your trained cats and your trained dogs and 
elephants, and the rest of 'em, but did yer ever see a 
trained fish ? No, of course yer haven't. Well I 
have, and what's more 1 owned that fish, and what's 
more, I trained 'im meself. When I was a young 
man, I had the good fortune to run across a salmon 
caught in a shallow pool of the river. Now as I said 
I was young and innocent — like and tender hearted 
and I couldn't bear to have the critter perish, so I 
gave him a toss which sent him back into deep water 
again. Well, would you believe it, from the moment 
that fish struck clear water he had an affection for 
me. He seemed to understand a kindness better than 
a good many men 1 have known. Why, within a 
month I had him so tame that whenever I whistled 
he would always come swimming up and wagging his 
tail. It wasn't very long before 1 had him harnessed 
up to a boat. I guess he kind of liked the idea. He 
was usually waiting for me whenever I got out my 
boat. Well boys you'd be surprised at the voyages 1 
took with Sam (called him Sam for short.) We 
went down the river to the sea, then to New York, 
crossed the Atlantic three times and made two trips 
around the world. But alas! poor Sammy was guilty 
of an indiscretion which, though it showed his zeal 
and affection for me, resulted in his death. One day 
at Boston I was unexpectedly delayed in the city, and 
Sammy becoming alarmed attempted to jump onto 
the wharf and was there killed by the succulent odor 
of baked beans. Such was the fate of the most in- 
telligent fish that was ever seen." 

When Jim had finished his tale he looked around 
with a defiant air as if he partly expected them to 
doubt the truth of it. There was a merry twinkle in 
the eyes of the old hands, but they preserved a rigid 
silence. Some stories of their own might bear ques- 
tioning. 



Then, after a pause old Abe Skinner raised himself 
on his elbow, and rolling his quid into his other cheek 
began: " That was a mighty good story Jim, quite a 
touching story, and it reminds me of a certain little 
incident that once happened to a gang of us as was 
prospecting for gold in the Rocky Mountains. What ! 
tell you about it Sim, why sure. The luck of the 
whole crowd had been awful bad fur weeks, and worse 
yet our grub was most gone. We had settled down 
on a little piece of land right in the fork of two rivers, 
and were doing a bit of hunting — only used rifles in 
those days, had no use fur a shot gun. We was all 
pretty good shots ; why darn me, when 1 was young 1 
could hit a swallow flyin' at a thousand yards. Waal, 
before we'd been thar a couple of days, along comes 
the most miserable specimen of a human critter 1 
ever saw. He was all in rags ; his hair was long and 
he had a staring wild look in his eyes. He told us the 
Injuns had burned his home, and that he had been 
wanderin' about fur weeks in the mountains. We 
took the poor cuss in and fixed him up a bit. He was 
a queer old animal, wonderin" like in his mind, always 
mumblin' somethin' about a highwayman who had 
been hanged on that very spot, and a ghost what used 
to walk around nights warnin' people away. I kind of 
believe in ghost but 1 didn't take any stock in what 
the old lunatic wus sayin'. He would always end 
m\h, ' and evil befall the man who stays,' The old 
codger disappeared shortly after this. One night we 
wus sitting 'round our fire just as we are to-night talk- 
ing about the hard luck and tellin' what we'ed do when 
we struck it rich, when all of a sudden we heard a 
deep groan coming from a little clump of bushes about 
twenty yards away. Everyone looked 'round quick 
like and there we saw coming slowly out of the dark- 
ness, the figure of a man. His face was white, his 
eyes starting from their sockets. What scared us 
most of all was a halter hangin' from his neck. On 
his bared chest were bullet holes with the blood run- 
ning down in little streams. My hair though it wus 
over a foot long rose straight on end. I was scared you 
bet, and the other fellers weren't much better ; one 
fainted, another had convulsions, while a third prayed. 
We realized that the ghost of the highwayman had 
come to drive us off the ground. Waal, that ghost 
continued to advance slowly step by step toward the 
fire, and at every movement we'ed jump about a foot. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



57 



Finally the spectre got to within ten feet of us, and 
then in a deep voice hissed out, ' Go to-morrow or 
YOU DIE.' Now there was somethin' in that tone that 
seemed faniiliar and gave me an idea too. So I 
whipped out my gun, stuck it under his nose and 
yelled, ' Throw up yer hands, you cussed old pirate.' 
You'd have laughed to see the lively manner in which 
that ghost obeyed. The boys got together then, 
pulled off his disguise, and exposed, as I fully expected, 
the old feller who had disappeared but a few days 
before. I knew he must have some object in these 
tricks, and I was determined to have it out. ' Now, 
you old duffer ' said I pointing my gun fairly at him, 
' What's your game, you've got a minute to cough up 
the truth.' After some hemming and hawing we got 
out of him that there was a lead of gold right under our 
feet. In half an hour we had found that vein.It was only 
four feet under the surface. Yes, there it was, the 
yellow metal that we had looked so long for. 

Unfortunately it was only a fragment of a vein, but 
when all worked out we had $2,000.00 each, includin' 
the old ghost (as we continued to call him.) 

The money didn't last me long though. Blew in ^ 
thousand of it inside of three months, and wus held up 
and nearly robbed of the remainder by the famous 
Bowlegged Gang. 

What ! want to hear about that too, waal chuck 
another log on the fire and I'll heave ahead." 

A. C. Wilson. 

[To be continued.] 



o°tes and ^©mmfn'ts. 



While the weather has not yet been cold enough to 
insure a good foundation for polo, still several times it 
has produced ice of sufficient strength to tempt the 
adventurous feather-weights. Moreover each cold 
wave seems to bring in its wake a light snowstorm. 
Thus for some time have our hopes for good skating 
on the morrow, been raised at evening only to be 
snowed under before morning. Nevertheless we hope 
ere long to be enjoying this most pleasant of winter's 
outdoor pastimes. Now before the college polo team is 
chosen, why not have a series of class games for a 
class championship ? This would bring out all who 
can play and would show just what material we have 
for a team. Such games would be not only interest- 



ing, but by bringing the best players to the front, they 
would help to make the college team more successful. 

* 
It has been the custom in the past to elect the cap- 
tain and the manager of the polo team sometime in 
the fall term. We believe that this custom has radi- 
cal defects, only one of which need be mentioned 
here. If, as is frequently the case, the manager be 
chosen from the senior class, what is he to do with 
the money in the treasury and the sticks and other 
things belonging to the student body, when he leaves 
college at commencement time ? There is then no 
one to take charge of these things and so they disap- 
pear. Now this is not business-like nor is it fair to 
the student body. In the future, let the captain and 
the manager be elected at the close of the winter 
term. The athletic committee should then require 
from the manager a report which might also be 
printed in the Aggie Life. 



We are pleased to call your attention to a new 
organization which is doing, in a quiet way, a good 
work. A few weeks ago several members of the 
freshman class met together and drew up a constitu- 
tion and by-laws for an " Anti Kuss Klub." A president 
and other necessary officers were duly elected. We 
are Informed the membership is limited, but that this 
klub will be glad to organize other klubs having the 
same object in view. It seems that when two mem- 
bers overhe ar a third member using profanity, they 
make out an indictment against the offender and 
deposit it with the secretary within twenty-four hours 
of the offense. At the regular meetings of the klub 
these indictments are brought forward for trial and 
the guilty man receives his fine, which we presume is 
in proportion to the provocation. We are not told 
just how the directors propose to invest the surplus 
now in the treasury, but we are assured that the re- 
ceipts are rapidly diminishing. 
* * 

# 

Since Thanksgiving, we have all noted with satis- 
faction, the evident improvement in the general tone 
and sentiment of the college students. No one can 
fail to see how much better it is to feel confidence in 
the student body. What is needed here at present is 



58 



AGGIE LIFE. 



more social life. The students should be more in 
touch with their professors. A little familiarity gives 
the professor more trust in the student and the student 
himself, feels that there is something more in college 
life than mere routine. It is evident that there has 
been more social life for the past few weeks than 
before and it is a step in the right direction. The 
" Kommers " which was held last Friday night, 
served to break the monotony of the term, and the 
college is deeply indebted to the " Kollege Kemical 
Klub." The social life of a college is very important 
and everything which tends to increase this is a great 
benefit to the institution. 



^olle^f ^©tfs. 



—Pay your 

Football subscription 
Before Christmas vacation. 

— Have you paid your laundry bill ? 

— Have you paid your foot ball tax ? 

• — Senior, " I never hear those freshmen above me 
quiet." 

— John H. Howard, 1901 has joined the Phi Sigma 
Kappa fraternity. 

— Pres't Fairchilds of the Kansas State College 
has been visiting our College. 

— Colds and sore throats seem to be epidemic, but 
nothing more serious is expected. 

— A large number of students are taking dancing 
lessons under Prof. A. X. Petit. 

— On Friday evening Dec. 3 the Junior class spent 
a very pleasant evening at Prof. Maynard's. 

— The Senior class in English have finished Jevons 
Logic and are now taking Principles of Argumentation 

— Prof. Cooley is taking a short course in the Wis- 
consin dairy school. He will return the first of next 
term. 

— Rev. Mr. Skinner of Amherst spoke before the 
College Y. M. C. A. last Sunday afternoon to a large 
and appreciative audience. 

— Rev. Robert M. Woods of Hatfield filled the 
pulpit last Sunday and his discourse on " India " 
where he has lately spent considerable time was very 
interesting. 



— On Nov. 23 the foot ball team was photographed 
by Lovell. Mr. Lovell has been chosen by the Sen- 
iors for class photographer. 

— A new time table for the Amherst & Sunderland 
electric road went into effect a short time ago. 
Copies may be obtained of conductors. 

— We are very glad to see that the new bath- 
rooms have been completed. In some respects they 
are much better than those of South College. 

— On Nov. 16 the Sophomores and Freshmen had 
a short rush coming out of chapel. The Freshmen 
assisted by the Juniors, held up their end of the 
argument. 

— Perhaps the faculty have realized to a slight 
degree since the night of the Kommers the necessity 
of having electric lights from North College to the 
boarding club. 

— The newly elected officers of the Republican 
club are as follows; Pres't J. S. Eaton ; vice pres't, 
J. R. Dutcher ; sec. and treas., W. R. Crowell ; 
directors, G. H. Wright, '98, F. H. Turner '99, H. J. 
Moulton 1901. 

— When is the basket ball team to be organized ? 
We must get together next term. Our athletics have 
never been in a more promising condition and we 
must not let them slack up at all. 

— There has been a valuable addition to our dairy 
department in the line of fifteen excellent dairy cows 
and a small barn for their use. We shall be much 
better able this winter than we were last to give the 
short course men a first class insight into the science 
of dairying. 

■ — We had quite an exciting foot ball game between 
the Freshman and Sophomore classes. The sophs, 
kicked off to the freshmen. On the next play '01 
fumbled and Brown picked up the ball and lost no 
time in running down the field for a touchdown. Hal- 
ligan failed at goal. Parmenter made the second 
touchdown by falling on the ball when it had been 
tossed over the line. Halligan kicked goal. The 
freshmen by good team work rushed the ball steadily 
up the field for a touchdown. Barry kicked goal. 
After the kickoff the freshmen made steady gains and 
when time was called the Freshmen had the ball on 
the Sophs' thirty yard line. The Freshmen put up a 
remarkably fine game, but unlucky fumbles account 
for their defeat. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



59 



— At a recent meeting of the N. H. S. for election 
of officers and directors the following men were 
elected : Pres't, R. D. Warden '98 ; vice-pres't, W. 
E.Hinds '99: sec. and treas., F. H. Turner '99 ; 
directors. Montgomery and Wright, '98 ; Wright and 
Smith '99, Parmenter and Monahan '00. 

— The members of the last year's polo team met 
and elected W. E. Hinds '99 captain and F. H. 
Turner '99 manager for the coming season. We 
suggest that at the close of this season the next year's 
officers be elected immediately, as is done by the 
other athletic organizations of the College, rather than 
to wait until the season arrives. This would have 
been done before, but it is a young association and 
evidently the managers never considered it necessary. 

— Alumni vs. Freshmen. The scrub team from 
the class of 1901 , defeated the so called alumni eleven 
on the Aggie campus on last Thanksgiving-day. The 
score was eight to zero, the failure to kick goals being 
due to a wet ball. The features of the game were 
the signals given by Peters '97, marvelous " fake 
plays " by Killday, excellent line work by Prof. Lull 
and the line bucking by Halligan. It was a very gen- 
tlemanly game, the only injuries being sustained by 
Prof. Lull, It seems sad that the last attempt made 
by our former students to play foot ball should end 
like this. 

— The usual petition for the Thanksgiving recess 
was circulated by the students and generally signed. 
The faculty* as usual granted it. We see in many 
schools and colleges a tendency to shorten the recess, 
allowing only Thanksgiving-day. For every New 
Englander Thanksgiving-day is full of precious memo- 
ries, some gay, some sad perhaps but all intimately 
connected with the old home to which we naturally 
turn our faces, and no rules should be made which 
tend to keep any man or woman from spending that 
day at home. 

— The following newspaper article was recently called 
to our notice and nearly every man here can profit by 
reading it : 

'There was an amusing and instructive incident at tiie 
Agricultural department the the other day. A young man 
who graduated at one of the Eastern colleges last summer 
called with a letter of introduction from the senator from his 
state, in search of a position, and explained that as he had 



been raised upon a farm and had a practical knowledge of 
agriculture, backed by a classical education, he thought he 
was capable of filling almost any position in the department. 
The secretary was glad to see him and said that he thought 
he could give him a position at once. 

" I want a man," he said, "who is up in soil physics, and 
if you have mastered that branch of agricultural science I 
will appoint you with a salary of $1,000 a year at once." 

'• What is soil physics?" inquired the young man. 

" It is the science of soils. It is necesssry for the man who 
takes this position to know all about the chemical composi- 
tion of the soils of different localities, their capacity to absorb 
and retain moisture , and the amount of moisture required by 
each kind of soil to produce the best results in different plants. 
Certain kinds of plants require more moisture than others, 
but it depends largely upon the character of the soil, and I 
want a man who is fully posted to take charge of a division 
here." 

The young man said that he did not feel capable of under- 
taking that job. 

"Perhaps you understand the bacteriology of milk ? " 
suggested the secretary, "and the chemical compositions of 
the different kinds of cheeses ?" 

" No," replied the candidate, "I have never studied that 
line of agriculture, but I suppose I can learn." 

"Yes," said the secretary, "any bright young man with 
your previous advantages can learn, but I cannot wait for 
him to be educated. I want him to-day. And I have just 
received an inquiry from the University of Colorado for a 
competent teacher in botanical biology. Could you fill such 
a position ? " 

"I'm afraid not," replied the young man, with a sad smile. 

"I'm sorry," returned Secretary Wilson. " Like many 
other young men who come here for positions, you seem to 
have a good deal of learning that you don't need and lack the 
practical knowledge that would make you useful to us. I 
advise you to take a course in agricuhural chemistry and 
agricultural economy and then come and see me again." — 
Washington Letter in Chicago Record. 

It might be pertinent to say here that too much is 
expected of a college educated man. When he fin- 
ishes his college course he is expected, by people who 
have not had such an advantage, to be a regular walk- 
ing encyclopedia, to know everything about all 
things. If a college man does not get a lucrative posi- 
tion immediately some one will say. " What has his 
college education done for him ? He is In just the 
same position that my son was four years ago when 
he completed his high school course." And another 
replies " In my estimation a college education doesn't 
amount to much." Very likely it doesn't help some 
men, but whose fault is it ? Is it the fault of the Col- 



6o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



lege ? Not often. Is it the fault of the professors ? 
Almost never. Is it the fault of the man himself ? 
Probably. When a man fits at a classical college he 
ought to know better than to apply to the secretary of 
agriculture for a position. He ought to know that the 
secretary of agriculture wants scientific men. Just 
because a man is born on a farm he thinks he knows 
all the science of agriculture, but if he wants to learn 
the scientific part of it let him go to a good first-class 
agricultural college, like our own, and when he gradu- 
ates he will be pretty certain of knowing something 
about almost any question the secretary of agriculture 
might ask him, further he would know a great deal 
about one subject, otherwise something is wrong with 
the man. The great trouble with a good many of our 
men is that they do not know exactly what branch they 
want to make a specialty of and they spend the whole 
four years in general scientific work. But the men of 
action who decide what lines they want to work on 
and get to work in earnest are the men who can make 
a success in life. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF '99 INDEX. 

College men. College graduates, College professors, 
we desire to call your attention to the twenty-ninth 
volume of the Index. 

The '99 Index is a large attractive book bound in 
an expensive cover ornamented with a gold stamp. 

Within, one of its most salient features is a sympo- 
sium entitled " Shall the Name of the College be 
Changed", a forceful article compiled by Dr. J. A. 
Cutter '82. Dr. Cutter has written to fifty of our 
most prominent graduates and professors asking for 
their views upon this question, and their answers he 
has carefully arranged for and against the change of 
name. 

An account of the Tri-decennial Day and the great 
kommers, and an historical sketch of the college are 
other commendable articles. There are also stories 
and short poems. 

The publication contains the finest artistic work 
ever produced in an Index. All the drawings have 
been made by our special artist, Mr. W. H. Arm- 
strong '99. There are nearly three times the usual 
number of full page half-tones, besides many smaller 
ones. Most of the illustrations are wash drawn and 
the expense of reproducing these has been very large. 



Among the views, the most important are " Aggie 
in 1867," " Aggie in 1897 " and a half-tone of the 
beautiful cup presented to President Goodell by the 
alumni. 

We wish to recommend the book on its artistic 
features. They alone are worth the price of the 
book. 

The cost of half-tones and printing and binding 
being so great, the editors at first considered the pro- 
ject of advancing the price, but, however, believing 
that the unusual artistic features of the book would 
warrant increased sales, they have desired to make 
no change in price which has been $1.25 postage paid. 

We desire to thank the generous friends who have 
assisted us in our undertaking. 

We trust you will consider our book when purchas- 
ing your holiday presents. 

The '99 Index Board. 

Alumni, 



'80. — Almon H. Stone. Address Wareham. 

'85. — Benoni Tekirian, Traveling salesman, Turkish 
rugs and oriental goods. No permanent address. 

'85.— Edwin W. Allen, 1713 Corcoran St. Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

'88. — Fred S. Cooley, granted leave of absence 
from Nov. 24 to Jan. 8, '98 to take course in dairying 
at Madison, Wis., Professor BrooKs taking his classes. 

'88. — A. I. Haywood. Address Agawam, Mass. 

'90. — Fred L. Taylor, student Harvard Medical 
School. Resides 32 Brook St., Brookline, Mass. 

Ex-'90. — Samuel N. Beaman, inspector with Chas. 
J. Jaeges Eclipse Windmill Co., High St., Boston, 
Mass. 

'92. — H. M. Thomson is taking charge of the Col- 
lege farm during absence of Supt. Jones on vacation, 

'93.— Cotton A. Smith, with N. B. Blackston & 
Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 

'94. — Ralph E. Smith, granted leave of absence to 
study abroad from Dec. 23, '97 to Sept. 6, '98. 
Kinney '96 takes his place in botany and President 
Goodell in German. 

'94. — Charles P. Lounsbury has issued his annual 
report as Government Entomologist of the Cape of 
Good Hope. Mr. Lounsbury is a man of whom his 



A6GIE JLIFfi. 



6x 



class and the college has just reason to be proud. 
Within a year after he graduated he went to the Cape 
of Good Hope as Entomologist to the English Govern- 
ment and his work there has been of the highest order. 
The report covers his work of the year and describes 
many of the injurious insects of that part of the coun- 
try as well as the methods of getting rid of them. Mr. 
Lounsbury takes the different trees and shrubs with 
their natural insect enemies and gives the results of 
experiments with different insecticides and the manner 
of application. Among some of the most important 
of these was the carrying out on a large scale the use 
of hydrocyanic acid gas in the distruction of the Red 
Scale on citron trees and the introduction of the Aus- 
tralian Lady Birds of which he gave a very fine 
description in his former report. His report is fully 
illustrated by drawings of his own of the different 
insects and pictures showing the use of many insec- 
ticides on a large scale. 

'94. — S. Francis Howard, student of Chemistry 
with Prof. Remsen at Johns Hopkins University, Bal- 
timore, Md. 

'94, — Announcement was made Oct. 27 of the 
marriage of Joseph H. Putnam to Miss Kate M. Tay- 
lor of North Amherst. 

'94.— Arthur H. Cutter, student at Harvard Medical 
School. 

Ex-'94. — Erastus J. Starr, farmer, Spencer. 

'95.— Henry B. Read and Miss Julia M. Chamber- 
lain of Westford, were married Oct, 20, 1897. 

'95.— Charles M. Dickinson. Address 834 East 
Lake Ave., Seattle, Washington, 

'95.— Geo. A. Billings. Agent Walker Gordon Co. , 
[Chicago, 111. 

'95. — Thomas P. Foley, special student at Harvard 
lUniv, Address 56 Plympton St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Ex-'95.— Edile H. Clark, Spencer, Mass. 

Ex-'95. — Alfred Davis is studying at Tuft's Medi- 
cal school. 

'96. — Francis E. de Luce, assistant in library, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'96, — Patrick A. Leamy, teacher, Butte, Mont. 

'96. — Merle E. Sellew entered course for graduate 
lurses, City Hospital, Boston, Mass. 



'96. — Wm. L. Pentecost is at work in Spencer. 

Ex- '96. — Josiah E. Green, chosen member of State 
Board of Agriculture to represent the Farmers and 
Mechanics Association. 

'96. — Henry W. Moore, address 25 Amherst St., 
Worcester, Mass. 

Two Year '96.— E. W. Capen, Manager Stony 
Brook Poultry Farm, Stoughton. Mass. 

'96.— Fred H. Read, N. Y. Business Institute, 81 
East 125th St., New York. 

'97.— James L. Bartlett. Transitman for Engi- 
neering Department, Metropolitan Park Commission, 
13 Exchange St., Boston, Mass. Residence 68 Web- 
ster Ave., Chelsea. Mass. Home address,Salisbury, 
Mass. 

'98. — A. Montgomery Jr., Bus. Mgr. of the Aggie 
Life is pleased to announce that he has not yet given 
up all hope of receiving a few subscriptions from the 
alumni. Address Amherst, Mass. 



fiatch E^perim^r\-t §tdk-tion 

DEPARTMENT OF FOODS AND FEEDING. 

In our last issue after speaking of the great value of 
science applied to practice, a short account was given 
concerning the character of the work of the chemical 
department of the station under the supervision of 
Prof. Goessmann. 

We desire in the present issue to refer to the work 
of the department of foods and feeding conducted by 
Dr. Lindsey. The work may be classified under 
three headings, namely : (a) Information, (b) Control 
work, (c) Investigation. 

By information is meant the answering of letters of 
inquiry addressed to the department by the farmers 
of the state. As full answers as possible are given to 
all questions coming within the limits of the depart- 
ment, upon which the farmer desires to be informed. 

The control work is practically all of an analytical 
character and includes the testing, free of expense, of 
dairy products, water and cattle feeds. 

The state law requires for example that all milk 
offered for sale shall contain 13 per cent, of total 
solid matter excepting during the months of April 
May, June, July and August when 12 per cent, is 
required. The milk of many herds especially those 



62 



Aggie tiM. 



In which Holstein and Ayrshire blood predominate, 
is liable to fall below 13 percent. The milk con- 
tractors of Boston keep a careful eye on the quality of 
the milk received by them and whenever a farmer 
furnishes milk much below the standard, he is in- 
formed that the quality must be improved or his 
product will no longer be needed. The state bureau 
of health and the state dairy bureau exercise in addi- 
tion a system of inspection. When the former is 
complained of, he naturally turns to the Experiment 
Station to inquire the cause and submits a sample for 
analysis. Farmers are also paying more attention to 
the quality of their product and in order to guard 
against any trouble, send samples of their milk to the 
Station to find out whether it is of so called standard 
quality. While it is recognized that a legal standard 
for milk prevents a great deal of adulteration it is 
hoped that in the near future it will be possible to sell 
milk on a guarantee of total solids and fat. This 
will then give the farmer the opportunity to sell the 
milk of any breed, and the consumer will have the 
privilege of paying for the quality he desires. 

The new food law is now in operation, and its pro- 
visions are executed by this department. Mr. B. K. 
Jones is now collecting samples of all concentrated 
cattle feeds found in Massachusetts markets. They 
will be analyzed, and the results published in especially 
prepared bulletins for free distribution so that farmers 
can be kept informed as to the character of the great 
variety of such materials as are now offered for sale. 
In addition to the analyses of these products, it is the 
intention to give such additional information as will 
enable the purchaser to form a correct opinion of the 
actual feeding and economic value of the material 
under consideration. In addition to the above control 
work — investigations are carried on both in the chemi- 
cal laboratory and in the feeding barn. During the past 
year considerable work has been done in studying the 
nature of recently discovered carbohydrates as well as 
in submitting to a critical test various methods for the 
estimation of starch. At the feeding barn an experi- 
ment covering eight months has recently been com- 
pleted on the value of the several varieties of salt 
hays, growing in the marsh along the coast. Experi- 
ments are now in progress with milch cows, in order 
to ascertain the quantity of digestible protein required 
per day in order to secure the best results. 



Digestion experiments with sheep are constantly in 
progress. Attention has been given to the digestibil- 
ity of soiling crops, and during the present winter the 
digestibility and consequent nutritive effect of a vari- 
ety of new hay products offered as cattle feeds will be 
ascertained. The feeding barn is under the exclu- 
sive control of the experimenters, and is well 
equipped for the work. It is hoped that another sea- 
son the department will be able to carry out inquiries 
concerning the best method to be employed for the 
production of an extra quality of milk and butter. 

LIBRARY NOTES. 

One of our latest books in Biography is entitled 
Phineas Pratt and some of his Descendants. This book 
is interesting from the standpoint that it was written 
by one of the Pratt family whose names were among 
those of the forefathers of the Plymouth Colony of 
New England. From the early history of this colony, 
the life of this family is written in detail and this book 
may be of great interest to one who is interested in 
the colonial history of New England. 

The Farmer's and Fruit Growers' Guide is a very 
practical agricultural book. It is issued by direction 
of the Hon. Sydney Smith, M. P,, and compiled by 
W. H. Clarke, editor of the Agricultural Gazette. 
This book carefully treats the subject of crops, soil, 
factors which determine fertility, chemical composi- J 
tion of the plant, rotation of crops, comparative value " 
of feeding stuffs ; in fact a great deal of condensed 
and carefully prepared matter which will be found to 
be of great value to the agricultural student. 

Grasses and Forage Plants of the Dakotas by 
Thomas A. Williams is a small book of forty-seven 
pages but contains the names with their descriptions 
of most all of the grasses of North and South Dakota 
and this will be found of great interest to one who 
desires to make a comparison with the grasses which 
grow in the East. 

Cotton Culture in Egypt, a very interesting pamphlet 
prepared by George P. Foaden, B. Sc, professor of 
agriculture, Tewfikieh College of Agriculture, Ghizeh, 
Egypt. The subject treats of the present condition of 
cotton culture in Egypt. Mr. Foaden writes this 
article after having considerable experience with the 
cotton plant and it is of great interest to read of the j 
different stages of this plant from the seed to 
maturity. 



Aggie lipje. 



^3 



The Cotton Plant, a book of over four hundred pages 
prepared under the supervision of A. C. True is an- 
other very interesting book. The introduction by 
Chas. W. Dabney is also helpful from an educational 
standpoint. Cotton as it is grown in India, Egypt, 
Brazil, Russia, Japan, China and several other 
countries forms a part of the subject matter in this 
book, which will undoubtedly bring to our minds many 
new ideas, if we should care to read it. 



C:)^cHan^es. 



SIGNS OF FALL. 
Among the withered clover blossoms 

Where once the phoebe sung, 
And robins, too, and bob-'o-links 

When summer days were young. 

Now in his ceaseless monotone 

The cricket chirps his lay, 
And seems to grieve that from the fields 

The birds have flown away. 

And frosty nights and shortening days 
And meadows brown, and sere, 

Proclaim that summer's past and gone. 
And autumn days are here. 



But surer harbinger of fall 
Than sign of earth or air, 

I trow is this, that college men 
Are growing "football hair."- 

LEAF YEAR. 



-Univ. Cynic. 



Perhaps it was the twilight gloom, 

Perhaps it was the buds in bloom 

Upon her breast that night, 

That made me dare to stoop and press 

Upon her lips' soft loveliness, 

A kiss — ah, rare delight ! 

I trembled at my hardihood, 

As she before me blushing stood. 

" Forgive me, dear," I said, 

" I know I've hurt your feehngs, Sweet." 

Her injured glance I dared not meet, 

But walked with downcast head. 

When at the gate I coldly said 

" Good-night," she raised her lovely head, 

And soft I heard her say, 

"You might — you might dear," [smiUng then] 

" Just hurt my feelings once again 

Before you go away. 

I. 
Years and years he spent at college. 

Filling up his mind with knowledge ; 
Learning Latin, Hebrew, Greek, 

Growing wiser week by week. 
But one thing he did not learn : 

How his daily bread to earn. 
Now his time he does employ 

Hunting for a job, poor boy. 



II. 
While in college he was "sporty." 

As an athlete, beat them all ; 
Never found he any equal 

As a pitcher of the ball. 
He became a local preacher. 

Blessed his practice of the nine, 
All the people flocked to hear him. 

His delivery was fine. — Ex. 



R. F. Kelton. 



D. B. Kelton. 



, F. KELTON & CO., 



DEALERS IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats, 



POULTRY, VEGETABLES, FISH HP OYSTE?S. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 

Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Murin & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific Jlincrican. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, ?3 a 
year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNNiCo.^eiBroadway, New York 

Branch Office, 625 F St., Washington, D. C 



64 



AGGIE LIFE. 




A STUDENTS 



^ 



You will be interested in the new Stearns year book. Among other 
things it gives full details of the wonderful new chainless Yellow Fellow. 



/ HE o / 






MM 






Prices will be considerably 
lower than previously 
but the quality remains 
unexcelled. 

" All Yellow wheels are either Stearns bicyles or imitations." 
Write now for agent's terms. 

^ E, C. STEARNS <& CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



|1 



■ 



fi 




Ab (Fa 

Practical Horseshoer, 

Rear of Purity Bakery, 
AMHERST, MASS. 

g^^-Best of work guaranteed...:,^ 

J. H. WEIsTTZELL, 

No, 2 Cook's Block, 

first Class HaiP Cutting and ShdVing. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBER'S SUPPLIES 
ALWAYS ON HAND. 

4S-GIVE: MB A -rRIAL.-=» 



MANUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



TEACHERS WAl 



I 



Over 4,000 vacancies. Faithful service guaranteed. Book 
rith free plans, 10 cents. Blanks free. Address, 

Southern Teachers' Bureau, Louiscille, Ky. 



MASS.>GRICULTU[[AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 

AMHERST, MASS. 




([jatehmakeF and Optician. 

Prompt skillful attention given to all fine 
and complicated watchwork. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. I^. BROWlsr, D. D. S. 



de: 

Cutler's Block, 



TISTS. 

Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

EANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



A. J. 

Practical Horseshoer, 



Rear of Purity Bakery, 
AMHERST, MASS. 

of work guaranteed, 







(Dassaehusetts figpieultaral College. 



AT THE 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



J 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



J. H. WEI^TZELL, 

No, 2 Cook's Block, 

first Class ^m Cutting and Shaving. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBER'S SUPPLIES 
ALWAYS ON HAND. 

iSS-GIVB MB A -TRIAL..-^ 



manufacturer of 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



Over 4,000 vacancies. Faithful service guaranteed. Book 
with free plans, 10 cents. Blanks free. Address, 

Southern Teachers' Bureau, Louiscille, Ky. 



R. F. Kelton. 



D. B. Kelton. 



•5 



DEALERS IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats, 



POULTRY, VESETHBLEe, FISH m OYSTERS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St. 



Holyoke. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E. B. HICKIMOOIf, H. U. S. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

9 TO 12 J^. Iv^., 1-30 TO 5 



Ether and Nirons Oxicle Gas administered when desired. 



IBERUI 



OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 

TEAMS. 



PHOENIX ROW 



PRICES REASONABLE. 

- - - AMHERST, MASS 



BOOTS AND SHOKS 

FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DKESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

I^-U-BSEIES O-OOZDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



t^Jiepairing done tvhile yoii tvait,.:^ 
2 J'M<EK1X JtOW. 



A. B. CALL, 

273 nain St., 

Society * Catering;. 

^^BEST MEALS SERVED IN NORTHAMPTON,,^ 
GIVE US A CALL. 



M. N. SPEAR, 



} 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
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VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST, MASS., JANUARY 19, 1898 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 

Terms $1.00 per year in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Randall D. Warden. '98, Editor-in-Chief. 
Alexander Montgomery, Jr., '98, Business Manager. 



Frederick H. Turner, '"■ 
George H. Wright, '98. 
.Avedis G. Adjemian, '98. 
William H. Armstrong, '99. 
George F. Parmenter, '00. 



', Ass't Business Manager. 
Willis S. Fisher, '98. 
Warren E. Hinds, '99. 
Charles A. Crowell, Jr., '00. 
James E. Halligan, '00. 



Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed to Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 

Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 
Y. M. C. A. 

Athletic Association, 

Foot-Ball Association, 

Base-Ball Association, 

College Boarding Club, 

Reading-Room Association, . 

Ninety-Nine Index, . . . . 



W. S. Fisher, Pres. 

J. S. Eaton, Sec. 

R. D. Warden, Manager. 

G. H. Wright, Manager. 

J. P.Nickerson, Sec. 

J- S. Eaton, Manager. 

D. A. Beaman, Manager. 



OLD YEAR REVERIES. 

It is so much fun 

To scud and run. 

Through the driving spray. 

On the storm-tossed bay ; 

And to hear the shriek and roar of the gale. 

As it pounds and whistles against the sail. 

It is so much fun 

With rod and gun. 

To skirt the rills. 

In the far-off hills ; 

And to listen to the murmuring brook, 

BabbHng elf tales in some shaded nook. 

It is so much fun 

When the day's done, 

To quietly sleep. 

While the dryards keep 

The long vigils through the lingering night, 

And whisper dreams until the break of light. 



Edi'teridJs, 



Military Ball ? Oh, yes ! 



The Index will now shortly be placed on sale. 

Owing to the retirement of J. R. Dutcher the 
managership of the '99 Index will devolve upon Mr. D. 
A. Beaman the assistant manager. 



Baseball practice will commence in February. 
Candidates will practice batting and sliding bases in 
the Gym, while the pitchers under Capt. Eaton will 
train in the cage in the basement of South College. 



The president of the Natural History society is now 
engaged in arranging for a schedule of lectures during 
the winter term. It is intended that there shall 
not be a surfeit of speakers but that each lecture 
shall be of the greatest possible interest to the student. 



It is time that those in charge of general athletics 
should commence arrangements for the winter Indoor 
Athletic Meets. It is of the utmost importance that 
every man on the track team should be kept in train- 
ing for the spring meets, and the only possible way of 
keeping up enthusiasm is, by competitive work, to 
keep up the interest of the athlete. 



The Editors of the Life desire to express their 
gratitude to the Alumni for the interest which has 
been manifested in their endeavors, shown by the 
numerous congratulatory letters which have been 
received. While it is true that this expression of 
good will is very pleasing to us, yet we must admit 
that whatever progress is made in our literary endeav- 
ors is directly owing to the ever onward march of our 
college and the high standard which is required by its 
professors. 



66 



AGGIE i^lFK. 



We have often wondered at the incongruities of the 
Christmas tide. While one-half the world makes 
merry about the cheerful hearth, feasting on all the 
good things of the season, the other half stands out- 
side in the cold and sullenly gathers up the crusts 
which are carelessly thrown in the snow. Vain mock- 
ery ! A celebration for the ennobling of mankind ! It 
was years ago when we met our first cruel disappoint- 
ment. The old legend of St. Nicholas, so beautiful, 
so fanciful in childhood ; alas, but a story, a myth, a 
childish delusion. We have sometimes stood by the 
sea at night, and gazing far away o'er the weltering 
waves have seen the glimmer of a feeble light slowly 
sink beneath the bordering darkness of the distant 
space. Sadly we have turned away from this scene 
with countless emotions struggling for expression. 
Oh ! the vanity of human emotions ! Of love, of pity, 
hatred and pleasure ! Just as the little light goes 
out, just as the distant darkness is in comprehensible, 
just as the waves now rise, now fall ; so it is with 
human affairs. We have often stood in solitude upon 
some high promontory beneath the stars and in an un- 
conscious dream have drifted on into infinite space 
where twinkling worlds were as the lights of a distant 
city. A star flickers feebly and goes out, another in 
a mad rush sweeps through the heavens and is gone, 
gone we know not where. They are not missed, 
countless thousands rise to take their places. In the 
distant city the lighted lamps play a ceaseless pano- 
rama. Their shade is hardly less easily penetrated 
than is the spacious darkness of the sky. 'Tis Christ- 
mas eve and in the streets the rich and poor alike are 
thoughtlessly yielding to the emotions of the hour. And 
yet how hollow are the joys of to-day, which to-mor- 
row are forgotten. Was he a true philosopher who 
wrote, " Let us eat and drink for to-morrow we die ?" 
The theme of life has ever been .a favorite with the 
poets and many have left expressions which shall 
always touch a responsive chord in the hearts of men. 
Of these poetic fancies there is no one who is not 
moved by that extremely sad yet tender strain, " Life 
is but an empty dream." Still, it was this same 
beautiful poet who in a conception infinitely more 
pleasing and courageous added, 

" Life is real, life is earnest. 
And the grave is not its goal." 



-PARADISE LOST. THE PURITAN EPIC" 

NOTES TAKEN FROM THE LECTURE OF CALVIN STEBBINS. 

Paradise Lost by John Milton. A Puritan epic. 

John Milton's experience was a remarkable one 
from his youth. He lived at the time of the battles 
of Nashby and Worcester, at the time when chivalry 
was announced by the clanging swords, and at the 
death of Cromwell his hopes are crushed. 

In the third great scene of Milton's life we find him 
sitting in darkness and solitude. He heard a voice 
from the cloud that called him as the servant of God 
saying, " Well done for the cause of truth." 

The story of Paradise Lost : 

Milton was far from being a rebel in his own esti- 
mation. In the twelth book of Paradise Lost we find 
Milton's conception of a king described as an usur- 
per. He believed that heaven was a commonwealth 
governed by him who could rule it best. Milton had 
no love for the rebel, and he told them how the kings 
had robbed them. 

From his youth Milton believed that he was to do 
in literature what the world would not let die. 

In Milton's note-book were ninety-nine subjects 
which he intended to work and among them was Par- 
adise Lost, — a drama. Milton was long in choosing 
its title and long in beginning to write upon it. He 
began in 1658, but he had many hindrances, first, his 
own personal safety, second, his blindness and then he 
was able to work only six months out of the twelve. 
It was not completed until he had worked on it for five 
or six years, and the first payment he received was 
only $87.50 while for the four editions published he 
received $350.00. 

Milton's autograph in the nineteenth century is val- 
ued at $215.00, equal to three fifths of what he 
received for the whole four editions of Paradise Lost 
to the fifteenth century. 

Truth, right, liberty and religion were to him tre- 
mendous forces. Paradise Lost is an epic on an 
original plan. Not a song celebrating a hero, neither 
does it celebrate any heroic deed in human history. 

It is essential to a clear understanding that the stu- 
dents have a clear idea of the cosmopolity of the 
poet. 

His first map consists only of the kingdom of 
heaven, and the dark bottomless pit of chaos. 

Our universe was called into existence from the 



67 



deep. When Satan first saw it, it looked in relative 
proportion as the star does to the moon. The heaven 
and the universe seemed to be connected by a golden 
ladder. There was another region outside the solid 
crust called " The Paradise of Fools." 

Milton was a borrower, but what he took he 
improved for it became Miltonic ; it reveals a life giv- 
ing power that you would not have suspected in the 
original. 

Milton's earth had its climate and temperature, 
contained gold and silver, and the precious stones. 
When Satan first saw it he called it a terrestrial 
heaven or Paradise. 

Milton's heaven is diversified as the earth, with 
brooks, lofty mountains, gentle slopes and extending 
plains. 

Milton loved bright things, — he loved nature, he 
loved the full blazing sun, he loved, the hour so often 
lost to use. the quiet evening with that mysterious still- 
ness, he loved the moon rising in cloudless majesty, 
he loved the morning and evening, he loved the bright 
flash of a precious stone, and thus he created earth. 

His angels eat, drink and sleep. The could fly, 
walk, move on sunbeams and take all manner of 
shapes. 

Milton's heaven and earth are beautiful. Milton's 
hell is by no means as large as his earth. You ask 
how could he describe it if he were never there ? 
Ah, yes he was there and he transformed that scene 
into vivid descriptions by words. Milton's hell was 
built for fallen angels until after the resurrection, Not 
until their second fall did they hunger as serpents, but 
before the fall of animal to brute they have some- 
thing more than animal appetites. 

Of Paradise in Eden who can speak but John Mil- 
ton himself ? One great peculiarity of Milton's was 
his power to weave " jaw breaking " words into musi- 
cal poetry. 

Eden is a country of large area and Paradise is sit- 
uated to the east. Upon Paradise Milton showered all 
his wealth of learning. He returned to it again and 
and again to add fresh beauty. All the beauties of 
the material world are there in profusion, all of the 
sweetest perfumes, strains of music aside from the 
tree songsters. What could be finer than the descrip- 
tion of the climate. The inhabitants were not 
unworthy of a blissful paradise. They were not like 



the men and women of to-day, they were living in the 
morning of the world. They had intensely human 
desires for the human. There happiness was supreme. 
The poet is never weary in writing about them. In 
the relation between man and woman Milton believes 
in the subordination of woman to man as 1 believe, 
says Mr. Stebbins, did St. Paul. 

His description of Eve is very vivid. She was fair, 
divinely fair. Eve is full of wonder. She began life 
by wondering at her own shadow. She is the child 
of wonder. 

The story of the temptation : Eve reasons well. 
Long does she ponder over the fragrance and beauty 
of the fruit. She plucks. Meanwhile Satan sneaked 
away, she sought for Adam, but she reasoned as she 
went. Adam was thunderstruck, but so great is his 
love for her that he partakes of the forbidden fruit that 
he might share his fate with her. The quarrel was 
ended. The sentence of death was indefinitely post- 
poned. The utterance of a noble woman touched 
the heart of vengeance, and turning to Adam, who is 
thinking af sacrificing his life, says " Thou to me art 
all things under heaven." So both taking the angel's 
hand are lead to the plains below. Many natural tears 
are shed but they are led on in solitude to Eden. 

The lesson to be learned is that men on earth are 
endowed with free will. They hold the keys for life 
or for death. It shows how persistent rebellion against 
God's will will result. To this triumphant consola- 
tion add faith, virtue, patience and love. The Puri- 
tan epic is the great culmination to the highest hopes 
of man. 
November 15, 1897. 



A MONUMENT TO LAVOISIER. 

At the great international exposition to be held at 
Paris in 1900, the French Republic will do honor to 
two of its most noted scientists. The first is Antoine 
Laurent Lavoisier, concerning whom this article is 
written, the second, M. Louis Pasteur of whom men- 
lion will be made in a subsequent issue of the Life. 

Over a hundred years have passed since the judicial 
murder -of Lavoisier under the reign of terror. Yet 
the " father of modern chemistry " is not forgotten, 
nor his fame obscured by the flight of years. " The 
Republic has no use for Scientists," was the cry of 
the mob as they hurried him to the guillotine. To-day 



68 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the greater and nobler French Republic that has 
arisen from the ruins of the old republic and the 
empire, pays tribute of honor to the greatest of the 
formerly despised scientists. Not only does France 
bring this tribute, but she invites the whole world to 
unite with her in making this monument to Lavoisier 
an international Memorial. Committees to take charge 
of the collecting of funds for this purpose have been 
appointed in all the civilized countries of the world 
and we here in America, should consider it a privilege 
to aid so worthy a project. Before discussing more 
fully the methods adopted by the American committee, 
a few words concerning Lavoisier's life and work may 
not be amiss. For much of this information the 
writer is indebted to papers issued by Professor Gus- 
tavus Detlef Hinrichs, M. D., LL. D., Professor of 
Chemistry in the St. Louis College of Pharmacy. 
So concise are Professor Hinrich's statements that it 
has been thought best to quote them freely in places, 
since no amiount of tinkering could improve them. 

Born in Paris, Aug. 26, 1743, Lavoisier devoted 
his entire life to scientific studies, especially to chem- 
istry. His labors include a great variety of subjects, 
foremost among them being his attack upon, and the 
eventful demolition of the phlogiston theory, and his 
experiments in connection with his nev/ theory of com- 
bustion. He taught that combustion was the union of 
oxygen v/ith the combustible substance, to which view 
we still hold as being the only correct one. He also 
determined the constitution of a large number of sub- 
stances, including sulphuric, phosphoric and carbonic 
acids, numerous metallic oxides, and many animal 
and vegetable substances. Together v/ith Berthollet, 
Fourcroy, and Morveau, he introduced a new and con- 
sistent system of chemical nomenclature. In 1768 
he was made a member of the French Academy, of 
which he was destined to be one of the most famous 
members, and having been appointed director of the 
government powder mills, in 1776 he discovered away 
of greatly improving the quality of gunpowder. His 
famous discovery of oxygen, entirely independent of 
Dr. Priestly, the celebrated English chemist who 
made the discovery at about the same time, was 
another of his famous achievements. Throughout 
his entire life he was intensely interested in Agricul- 
tural Chemistry, and was a constant worker in this 



field, a fact which should cause the members of our 
college to take a special interest in the results of his 
labors. Among his writings the " Traite Ele'mentaire 
de Chimie," may be mentioned as the most important. 
Yet the chemists of the civilized world are not the 
only class of scientists who are indebted to the great 
founder of the chemistry of the elements. " Astron- 
omers gratefully remember his co-operation with 
Laplace, his work in the establishment of the metric 
system and the determination of its units, supporting 
the field work of triangulation of his money, and 
measuring and weighing v/ith Hauy in his laboratory 
till ruthlessly thrown into prison. Physicists begin 
their exposition of the measurment of heat by the 
description of the first calorimeter and the work there- 
with, all by Lavoisier. Experimental physiology also 
began in the laboratory of Lavoisier with his experi- 
ments on respiration at rest and under external mechan- 
ical work. Mineralogists and geologists have not for- 
gotten that the first personal work of the young Lavois- 
ier was the beginning of the geological map of France, 
the first map of that kind ever made." 

Yet even so great a public benefactor could not 
escape the blind fury of the mob of the Revolution. 
As a collector of taxes and a pronounced royalist he 
came under the displeasure of the leaders. Professor 
Hinrichs gives the following account of his execution : 
" As has always been, so it always will be ; in times 
of great fervor and disturbance the dregs of mankind 
will gain control. The ' Reign of Terror ' was that 
of Marat, Danton and Robespierre. Noble Charlotte 
Corday removed the first, July 13, 1793, Robes- 
pierre removed his colleague April 5, 1794, and soon 
after (July 28, 1794,) decent men had regained 
enough courage to remove the last of these bloody 
triumvers of terror. 

During this time when the fanatics of ' liberty, 
fraternity and equality ' had in six months committed 
more crimes than all the kings of France in six cen- 
turies (Macaulay), when the beautiful Vendee had 
been devasted by flames, and depopulated by ' mitral- 
lades ' and ' noyades,' when the Christian religion had 
been formally abolished, (Nov. 13, 1793,) and a so- 
called ' Era of Reason ' enacted in its place, then it 
was that a few* of the most vile and beastly of the 
Jacobins that terrorized beautiful France did wreak 



AGGIE LIFE 



69 



vengeance on Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, tlie founder 
of the science of modern chemistry. 

For long months they kept him in a vile dungeon, 
then they tried him, and convicted him of treason to 
his country, of corruption in office, and of poisonous 
adulteration of tobacco manufactured under his direc- 
tion. Having tried him according to law, they con- 
demned him to be executed within twenty-four hours. 
They hauled him in a cart to the ' Place of the Rev- 
olution,' and cut off his head by means of the guillo- 
tine. May 8, 1794 (19 floreal, year 2.)" 

A fac-simile copy of the certificate of this memor- 
able execution is issued by Professor Hinrichs : " As 
stated on the face of this historic document, it was 
* registered gratis ' on the 22d floreal of the second 
year of 'the republic, one and indivisible.' That 
republic survived this infamy only about a year. Then 
the directory came, and Napoleon shot down the mob. 
In 1799 he was made first consul, and, soon after, 
emperor, the 'one and indivisible republic' being swal- 
lowed up entire by the military hand that had cowed 
the monster ' Terror.' 

The studied conforming to law in this entire out- 
rage on hUrtianity and justice has struck me most 
forcibly during the perusal of this sickening tragedy. 
All parties involved in this prosecution and murder of 
Lavoisier acted in* strictest conformity to law, they 
quote it, they even have it made fresh ; they bring the 
accused ' free and without chains ' before the tribunal, 
to be tried by a jury. And what a jury, and what a 
trial ! Facts misrepresented, and no chance given 
the defense to prove this ! False testimony accepted, 
'and the defense prevented from showing it up. Every- 
thing was done, however, in strict accordance with the 
letter of the law. In the name and according to the 
letter of the law the greatest crimes condemned in 
history have been committed. When the heart of 
man has become corrupt, even the law is made an 
instrument of crime." 

Such in brief is the story of his trial and execution. 
The record of his life is one that should endear his 
memory to every American citizen. " While this 
country was feeble, and struggling for liberty against 
unheard-of odds, our own Benjamin Franklin found in 
the house of Lavoisier a circle of friends contributing 
to bring about that alliance with France which before 
Yorktown made our independence a reality, and for- 



ever linked the name of Lafayette with that of Wash- 
ington in the hearts of all Americans. For all of these 
reasons we believe that our people will be glad of the 
opportunity now presented to contribute to the monu- 
ment that is to mark the blood of one of the noblest 
of our race," 

Subscriptions to the Lavoisier Monument will be 
received by the members of the American Lavoisier 
Committee whose names are given below. Prominent 
in this list will be noticed the name of Dr. Charles A. 
Goessmann of our own college, and this institution 
should congratulate itself that one of its faculty has 
been thus honored. His long residence abroad and 
his intimate acquaintance with the leading scientists 
of this century make Dr. Goessmann particularly 
adapted for this work. In this connection it may 
interest our readers to know that Dr. Goessmann's 
father (Dr. Heinrich Goessmann) and the eminent 
Professor Wohler, (afterwards Dr. Charles Goess- 
mann's instructor) were both pupils at Marburg under 
the celebrated Dr. Wurzer, who was one of Lavoi- 
sier's brightest students, as well as his illustrious 
master, v/as condemned to death by the revolutionary 
tribunal. While escaping from Paris he was pursued 
by a mob, and took refuge beneath a bridge while the 
disappointed Jacobins were searching for him on all 
sides. Such, however, was the horror of his situation 
that when the morning dawned he found that his hair 
had turned snowy white in that single night. Later 
Wurzer became director of Napoleon's flying hospital 
during the first invasion of Germany, and subsequently 
was professor of chemistry and medicine at Marburg, 
where, as we have said above. Dr. Heinrich Goess- 
mann and Dr. Wohler were among his pupils. Dr. 
Wurzer pays the following tribute to his old master : 
" Lavoisier was the man who inaugurated the brilliant 
Revolution in Chemistry, and founded the present 
system, the advantages of which have been recognized 
by the the chemists of all nations, a system which does 
not presuppose the existence of a substance for which 
no direct experimental demonstration can be made." 
He goes on to say, " Lavoisier lost his head, the 
grandest, perhaps, which since a century has sat 
between two human shoulders, in his fifty-first year on 
the blood stained guillotine, on the 8th of May, 1794, 
in the midst of the most terrible storms of the French 
Revolution." This tribute, coming as it does from a 



70 



AGGiK Liin 



German unprejudiced by antagonistic feelings of 
nationality, carries with it unusual weight. Such was 
Lavoisier, the great man whose memory the nations 
are about to honor. The managem.ent of the memo- 
rial subscription is under the direction of the Academy 
of Sciences of Paris, the treasurer of the fund being 
M. Gauthier-Millars. Already over one hundred 
thousand francs have been contributed, yet much more 
is needed to carry out the plans of the committee. 
The monument will stand in the north portal of the 
great Madeline church, from which the Rue Royal 
leads to the square where Lavoisier was beheaded. 

Each member of the committee bears personally 
his proportion of the charges for postage, transmisson 
of funds, etc., so that each contributor to this worthy 
cause can rest assured that the full amount of his 
gift will be received in Paris. Souvenir receipts are 
issued, and the names of all who assist will be placed 
in the archives of the Academy at Paris. Students 
and professors in our American colleges have already 
aided generously by their gifts, and it' is hoped that 
the undergraduates and faculty in our own college will 
see that Aggie is represented in this good work. No 
matter how small the sum, it shows a kindly interest, 
and goes to swell the total. All contributions should 
be handed to Dr. Charles A. Goessmann, who will 
furnish copies of the souvenir receipts, and attend to 
the matter of forwarding. The following is a list of 
the American Lavoisier committee : 

Jasper L. Beesom, A M., Ph. D., Professor of Chem- 
istry in the Audubon Sugar School, Research Chemist 
for the Louisiana Sugar Experiment Station, etc.. 
New Orleans, La. 

Charles Anthony Goessmann, Ph. D., LL. D., Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry at the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, Chemist of the Hatch Experiment Station of 
the College, Chemist of the Massachusetts State 
Board of Agriculture, etc., Amherst, Mass. 

EngeneW. Hilgarde, Ph. D., LL. D., Professor of 
Agricultural Chemistry in the University of California, 
Director of the California Experiment Station, Berk- 
eley, Cal. 

Richard Watson Jones, M. A., LL. D., Professor 
of Chemistry in the University of Mississippi, Univer- 
sity, Miss. 

John Uri Lloyd, Professor of Chemistry in the Eclec- 
tic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, President, (1887), 



American Pharmaceutical Association, Cinncinnati, O. 
John H. Long, M. S., Sc. D.. Professor of Chemistry 
and Director of the Chemical Laboratories of the 
Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy of Northwestern 
Universi.y, 2421 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 

John Ulric Nef, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry and 
Director of Kent Chemical Laboratory of the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

James Marion Picket, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of 
Chemistry in the University of Alabama, Univer- 
sity, Ala 

Paul Schweitzer, Ph. D., Professor of Agricultural 
Chemistry and Chemist to the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 

William Simon, Ph. D., M. D., Professor of Chem- 
istry in the College of Physicians and surgeons of 
Baltimore, in the Maryland College of Pharmacy, and 
in the Baltimore College, of dental surgery, Balti- 
more, Md, 

Edgar F. Smith, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry of 
the University of Pennsylvania, Director of the John 
Harrison Laboratory of Chemistry, President (1895), 
of the American Chemical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Eugene Allen Smith, Ph. D., State Geologist of 
Alabama, formerly Professor of Chemistry, now of 
Mineralogy and Geology in the State University of 
Alabama, University, Ala. 

Henry Trimble, A. M., Ph. M., Professor of Analyt- 
ical Chemistry in the Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy, Editor of American Journal oj Pharmacy, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph. D., Professor of Chem- 
istry in the University of North Carolina, Chapel 
Hill, N. C. 

Gustavus DetleJ Hinrichs, M. D., LL. D., Professor 
of Chemistry in the St. Louis College of Pharmacy, 
Delegate of the Academy of Sciences, of Paris for 
the United States, St. Louis, Mo. 

Leavens, '97. 



SOME NEW ARABIAN NIGHTS. 
The Legend of the Valley Beautiful. 
While passing through that country which lies west 
of the Ebia range of hills, I stopped one evening at a 
rather secluded farm house. My route had taken me 
some miles from any village where there was a habi- 
table shelter, so I had resolved to make the best 



AGGIE LIFE. 



71 



of a bad bargain, and secure such lodging for tfie 
night as the country afforded. 

The valley through which I had been tramping 
since early morning, was one of the most beautiful 
bits of Nature it has ever been my pleasure to see. 
Surrounded by wooded hills, it lay nestled away from 
the busy world, like a little Paradise. A slow-moving 
river ran between clumps of drooping willows, with 
here and there a little cascade or rippling rapids to 
add a charming variety to its otherwise stolid course. 
The meadows stretched away in their rich verdant 
greens and the heather on the sloping hillsides fur- 
nished a Soft and pleasing background of purple and 
white. There were no houses visible during my morn- 
ing walk : indeed it was not until late in the afternoon 
that I espied the smoking chimney of what appeared 
to be a low thatched farm house. 

As it was manifestly impossible for me to reach 
the other side of the valley before night-fall. I 
resolved to seek what hospitable shelter the good 
peasants, if such they were, might offer me. 

The house was much farther off than I had fancied 
when I first saw it, and it was not until the sun was 
well down that I reached its door. As I entered the 
yard-way, a huge mastiff dog aroused himself and 
warned me that, if we were not to be friends I should 
most likely meet an antagonist of no mean power ; but 
I have no fear of dogs ; we most always turn out to be 
friends.and after a sniff at my trousers' leg, the animal 
concluded that I was not a very dangerous specimen 
of the genus homo. 

The dog's barking had aroused the inmates of the 
house, and soon the huge front door was thrown wide 
open and a man's figure was silhouetted against the 
warm light of the interior. I had hardly time to 
notice the queer construction of the house or to make 
my wants known when I was invited inside with true 
southern hospitality. 

The door led directly into a small ante-room 
that opened into a larger room which was profusely 
hung with pictures. About the room stood bits of 
bric-a-brac ; old pieces of Sevres rested within an 
ancient Chippendale ; an easel or two occupied one 
end of the appartment, and the usual collection of 
swords, draperies and casts that go toward furnishing 
an atelier, were scattered about jn a se§rning disorder 
that must have been studied, 



There was a bright fire burning upon the open 
hearth, although the night was still warm. As I 
entered, a magnificent boar-hound arose from his 
place beside the fire-dogs, and numerous small puppies 
and fluffy cats, that had been distributed about the 
corners, scattered helter-skelter at the sound of strange 
foot-steps. 

My host was evidently an artist and a lover of 
animals ; he was also a smoker as the room bore 
ample evidence of tobacco. This latter pleased me, 
for I can truthfully say, gentlemen, that in all my life 
I have never known a smoker who was not a good 
fellow. My Lady Nicotine is very choice in the " 
selection of her devotes, and, mark my word, you 
will spend your pleasantest evenings with him who 
knows good tobacco and appreciates it. There is 
little formality of introduction to be observed between 
confirmed smokers ; they meet on a common ground, 
their very "weed " is a sufficient card of introduction. 
And so it was with us. After the inner-man had been 
satisfied, we smoked. Talked 1 yes, talked and thought. 
I confess, I did most of the thinking. 

Before me sat a man whose name had been upon 
the tongues of every man and woman of my native 
town ; whose fame had become as widespread as the 
continent Itself ; whose life amid a bustling city had 
been the envy of the many,and who was now ensconsed 
in this lonely studio amid a bevy of cats and dogs of 
every description imaginable. 

I recollected how this man had electrified an art 
centre and then suddenly disappeared when at the 
zenith of his fame ; I remembered how the fashion- 
able dames would besiege him for sittings, and I 
also remembered some articles of my own which I 
had had the temerity to publish, relative to his artistic 
ability, and which he had had the kindness to acknowl- 
edge in words of thanks. 

Nov/ we were sitting together and he was showing 
me his sketches ; finished and unfinished. Some 
merely drawn in with charcoal, others with the body 
colors laid on. Question after question arose in my 
mind, and I fear that I burdened the good man, for, 
with his replies, I must have kept him busy. 

At last my eyes rested upon a canvass that I had 
not before noticed : it hung above the fire-place 
and was rather obscured by shadows. Seeing my 
curiosity, my host fixed the light so that it would fall 



72 



AGGIE LIFE. 



full upon the picture. It was, perhaps, a three-quarter 
length portrait of a woman, of about twenty-five or six ; 
of rather slight build, with a pleasing though peculiar 
face, and a restless look to body and hands. At first 
I was only attracted by the technique of the work, 
which was marvelous in its perfection, but as I con- 
tinued to look, at it I became more and more im- 
pressed with the whole air of the pose, until I could 
hardly remove my eyes. The fascination of that 
wonderful, though indescribable, face was so great 
that my host spoke twice before 1 realized where I 
was. 

" If I were you," he said softly, " I should not look 
at that picture too long. It was that, or rather the 
original of that, which caused me to leave fame and 
fortune when both seemed to be within my grasp." 

"Indeed," I said: and rather irrelevantly, "The 
original seems hardly human." 

" Why do you say that ?" he eagerly asked. 

" I hardly know," I replied. " It is one of those 
intuitive traits of mine which seize upon an effect 
without giving any reason for such a conclusion. 
There is a certain expression to the eyes that is 
peculiar to say the least. It is a fascinating look and 
yet there lurks within those orbs something that 
borders on a realm distinctly not human. What is it, 
and who is she?" 

"Your second question is much more easily an- 
swered than the first," said the artist thoughtfully. 
''She is my wife." 

" Oh." I exclaimed, " I beg a thousand pardons." 

" For nothing," the painter replied. " Others have 
said the same ; I have thought it myself. It is one 
of those inexplicable mysteries that sometimes be- 
comes attached to mortals here with us. We feel it, 
we know that it exists, but we cannot account for it." 

" You say she is your wife ?" I asked. 

" Yes," he replied. " She is alive ; she is here 
now." 

" Here now !" I exclaimed. 

" Do not be startled, my friend," he said soothing- 
ly. " I mean here in the valley. She is not in the 
house, but she is somewhere upon the heath. You 
must know that this is her Valley Beautiful and every 
little hair-bell knows her tread ; every flower awaits 
her coming. It was for her that I renounced the 
world ; it is for her that I live here. She would not 



live elsewhere and I could not exist but by her side." 

" But you work, man !" I exclaimed. " Think of 
what you owe the world ." 

"The world!" he said half dreamingly. "The 
world 1 What do I owe the world ? What has the 
world ever given me of her own free accord ? Every 
triumph, every success, I have wrung from this cruel 
world, you speak of, by the sweat of my brow ; by the 
bursting of one heart string after another. What is 
the cold applause of the multitude to the smiling 
praise of such a woman as that? If I am a fashion- 
able success, my studio is crowded ; to-day I am an 
artist, to-morrow I am naught but a poor painter 
struggling against poverty in a rat-infested garret. 
Bah ! Your world is a sham, a delusion. It is 
cold, cruel, heartless. But she ! She cares not for 
my popular applause ; to her the praises of critics are 
but empty sounding timbrels. I am her world and 
she is mine. The caress of her hand, after a hard 
day's work, is greater meed than all the prizes that 
the Academy can give. Her step is dearer to me 
than the tread of the gallery multitudes. She brings 
me a true comradeship and love in place of a supercil- 
ious regard and empty applause. She wished for her 
Valley Beautiful, — •" 

" And she has got it," said a sweet sad voice at the 
opened door. 

I hastily turned and beheld to my astonishment the 
original of the picture that I had been admiring. 
There was the same slight build, the same restless 
movement and the same peculiar expression to the 
eyes and face. She entered the room slowly and 
deposited her burden of freshly gathered flowers upon 
the table ; then she turned full towards me. For the 
first time I realized the cause of the peculiar expres- 
sion about the eyes ; — this beautiful woman was 
insane. 

When the poet had finished, the landlord offered 
the suggestion that we should close the evening with a 
tale that he would relate, so he began — 

The Story of John Brendt. 

F. A. M. 



— The skating on our pond has been very poor this 
year and polo has not had a fair show. Give us good 
ice and we'll take our chances with the rest. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



73 



CAMP FIRE TALES. 

(Continued.) 
THE BOW-LEGGED GANG. 

Old Abe Skinner bit off another piece of tobacco 
and stared at the glowing embers. There appeared 
to be a magic power in those red hot coals, which 
recalled old reminiscences and brought them forward 
on his mind distinct and vivid. The old man slowly 
raised his head and began : 

•' It has been a long time since I wus in Denver, 
and I reckon it appeared to me one of the finest cities 
in the West. I hung 'round there just three months, 
and it cost me a thousand. Now, I call that purty 
expensive livin' for a man of my sort, and you'll not 
be surprised if I lit out of there and went gold-diggin' 
agin. I joined a party and struck out for the South 
West. We wus headin' for a new strike called Firey 
Gulch, just across Spanish Peaks, in the San Luis 
valley. It wus an uneventful trip of four days to the 
foot-hills, but with a rest of twenty-four hours, both 
horses and men were as fresh as Indian ponies, and all 
hands ready for the climb across the mountains. We 
took the now famous Laveta Pass and next afternoon 
after four hours hard traveling, we emerged from our 
rocky highway, and saw spreadin' out before us the 
beautiful valley of San Luis. It gives one the impres- 
sion of having once been the bottom of an immense 
lake, level, and smooth, with the mountains risen up 
on the other shore fully thirty miles away. To the 
north among the foot-hills, as if seekin' shelter from 
an enormous mountain, not less than fifteen thousand 
feet high, is a collection of log-huts. They compose 
the mining camp of Firey Gulch. Ah, boys, can I 
ever forget that camp ! It wus there I met Peggy 
McFarlin, the finest little heifer I ever saw. I don't 
believe there wus a gal in Denver could hold a candle 
to Peggy for good looks. And you should see her 
ride that broncho of hers — a vicious brute to anyone 
else, but she want afraid of anything. Peggy had a 
light 32 repeatin' rifle that she always carried with 
her, ' to scare away bad men,' she laughingly told us ; 
and in her hands that rifle could do purty work. I'v 
been reckoned a good shot myself, but I couldn't beat 
Peggy McFarlin. Peggy was the daughter of old Pat 
McFarlin, who struck Firey Gulch three days after us. 
She hadn't been in the camp long before the whole 
blessed crowd wus dead in love with her, includin' 



myself. Oh, yes, I've been weak in my time, and 
there's precious few of us as hasen't. I wus quite a 
fine appearin' young fellow then, with a free and easy 
style, and Peggy seemed to have found it out, lestwise, 
she led me to believe so. We (that is our party of 
seven) had pitched our tents in a shallow depression, 
about a quarter of a mile from the main body of the 
camp. Two shafts of twenty-five feet each were sunk, 
and the returns, though of a poor quality, were consid- 
ered fairly good. Gold-minin' is not what it's cracked 
up to be, nohow — a few rich finds are proclaimed 
throughout the country, and men rush from all parts of 
the world to the new diggins', thinkin' they'll get rich 
in a day. Of course the tenderfoot will point to some 
lucky ones, and say if they did it, why can't I ? That 
may be so, but think of the number of miners who 
die poor men, and in the end the chances of success 
are less than in any other business. No sir, thar's 
only one way to get rich gold-minin', and that is to 
retire when you make a big haul, and don't spend it in 
prospectirj,' for more." 

" At this time Firey Gulch was m a state of excite- 
ment, caused by the sudden appearance of the noto- 
rious Bow-legged Gang. This famous gang had been 
operating about 125 miles west of Denver, and now 
we were to be honored by their attentions. They 
hadn't gathered in much swag as yet, and were content 
with playing a few jokes on the camp, just to show 
how completely we were in their power. It was 
amusin' to see the way they swiped Jim Knowit's dorg. 
Jim hitched the animal outside of his hut to frighten 
away robbers. In the night the dorg disappeared, and 
when a tenderfoot arrived the next afternoon leadin' in 
the missin' cur Jim raised a great fuss. The ten- 
derfoot said he bought it from a bow-legged man only 
the day before. This caused a big laugh on Jim, for 
we well knew it was the captain of the Bow-legged 
Gang as did the trick. He must ha' bin' a humorous 
sort of feller ; some said that formerly he was a 
comic opera singer from Boston. That may be true 
for all I know, as some mighty clever rogues have 
come from there, Waal, Jim Knowit cussed for an 
hour straight and swore he would fix them yet. He 
had about five hundred dollars, the result of two 
weeks' diggin', and proposed to his partner that they 
should take turn about watching the gold. Jim should 
stand guard the first night, and his partner the second, 



74 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and so on. Having agreed to this Jim put the nnoney 
in his belt, and mounted guard with the look of a man 
who never gets anything well done unless he does it 
himself. Imagine the surprise of the camp next morn- 
ing when he was found asleep before the coroner's 
shanty ; with his pockets picked, money, gun, and every- 
thing of value gone, with a sign hung 'round his neck 
marked ' Easy.' He din't seem to know how it hap- 
pened (men seldom do in these cases), but thought 
that some one had knocked him on the head from 
behind and then drugged him. Now, this sort of thing 
made the boys desperate. They held a meetin' and 
decided to offer a reward of eight hundred dollars a 
head for every member of the gang caught dead or 
alive." 

" One evenin' Peggy and her father came over to 
our diggins' to make a social call (as they did purty 
often), and the gal and I had a long talk together that 
night. I told her of my prospects, how I loved her; 
and finally nerved myself up to asking the critical 
question. The sweet little angel nestled closer in my 
arms, shook back the hair from her forehead, and 
raised her ruby lips up close to mine, at the same time 
murmurin,' "but Abe, dear, how much money have 
you?" Who would have believed it, she was actually 
thinkin' of dollars and cents while I wus talkin' love 1" 
" Money ! Peggy," I said, " we won't think of money 
when we get married, money needn't bother us, just 
look here what I carry 'round for small change," and 
I drew out about nine hundred dollars, all I had in the 
world. This altered matters considerably to her, and 
then she was only too glad to name the day." 

'• Come along Peggy," shouted old Pat McFarlin. 
Havin' got through talkin' to the boys he fancied the 
same of us. 

" It's gettin' late," he continued, " we must git back 
to the camp. Perhaps," he added jokingly, "some 
of them robbers may be prowlin' 'round." 

" Oh, I'm not afraid of a man while I have this," 
she returned, flourishin' her shootin' iron, and then, 
dartin' at me a glance full of tenderness and affection 
she slipped away to her old dad. 

I went up to the fire and began tellin' the boys 
what a power I was among the ladies, forgettin' to 
mention how the nine hundred had helped me out. 
They were all very much interested, when — " Sorry 
to trouble yer, gentlemen," said a deep voice not ten 



feet away. We glanced around to see where the 
sound came from. What was our surprise to find 
that we were completely surrounded by armed men. 
Our first thought was to draw our guns, but as there 
were more than a dozen six shooters coverin' us at 
that moment, the attempt would only cause useless 
bloodshed, so we threw up our hands in a hurry. A 
man who appeared to be the leader stepped up closer 
to the fire, so that we had a full view of him : he was 
short, stocky, smooth-faced, and — heavens ! bow- 
legged. There was no doubt about it now, we were 
in the clutches of the bow-legged gang. His eye 
looked wicked as he calmly said. " We don't want to 
kill you, boys, but we mean to have your gold, and 
if any one of you makes the slightest resistance we'll 
give him a free pass to the next world." With that, 
two of them started in to take up the collection. 

When they came 'round to me, my watch and a 
few stray dollars quickly disappeared into their spac- 
ious pockets. I was beginning to congratulate my- 
self upon having stuffed my pouch of ' mint drops ' 
into the leg of my boot. It was a piece of mere luck 
that I had happened to slip it in there. Them pirates 
would never guess that there was a large amount of 
money about me. 

" I don't seem to find it," remarked one who had 
already gone over me once very carefully. " Yer sure 
about it, captain, are yer ? " he continued, turnin' 
'round to the bow-legged leader. 

" Cartin' " , returned the captain stridin' up to me. 

" Now, look-a-here, Skinner," he said, " we knows 
you carry 'round quite a little ' pin money ' , so just 
fork over them eagles." 

"What eagles? " 

" Ah ! come off ; them yer showed the gal. Hurry 
up or " — and here he raised his gun. 

I saw the game was up, but what riled me wus to 
think that any one had heard me talkin' to Peggy. 

Just then 1 noticed an object in the bushes, com- 
ing quickly towards us, and supposed it wus another of 
those skulkin' robbers ; the outlines becomin' more 
and more distinct, I recognized the trim little figure 
of Peggy. What wus she doin' there ? She saw the 
state of affairs. Why didn't she rush back to the 
camp and give the alarm? No, she slowly raised her 
rifle — crack ! crack ! The two villians 'long-side me 
fell in a heap ; the others startled, looked 'round. I 



AGGIE LIFE. 



75 



whipt' out my shootin' iron and blazed away. The 
air was full of lead for ten seconds then all hands 
sought cover. We kept up the fight for a few min- 
utes, when the firing brought over the miners in a 
body. On the arrival of these, the robbers drew off 
in a hurry ; and the gallopin' of horses told us they 
were in full flight. 

Two of the mugs were lying across each other, 
dead, and the reward of $1600 would go to our party. 
But if — here an idea struck me, which I followed up 
by describin' in glowin' terms to the crowd around me, 
Peggy's part in the affair. 

Jes' as I counted on, the boys voted her the whole 
of the reward, and chipped in an extra five hundred. 

Yes, sir ; the heroine of Firey Gulch was Peggy 
McFarlin. 

Think of it: what a nice little pile we'ed have to 
start in on. 

" But Peggy," says I " how's it you came back in 
the nick of time ? You didn't see any of the gang 
sneekin' 'round, did you ? " 

" You old innocent," she laughed roguishly," you 
forgot to kiss me good-night. That's why." 

I didn't need a second invitation, and as she broke 
away she whispered, " They didn't get your money, 

did they? " 

* * * * * 

At this point. Old Abe paused and drew a long deep 
sigh. 

" I suppose," remarked Jim Dole, " you were mar- 
ried and lived happy ever after?" 

"No, the derned little flirt ran away with a rich 
tenderfoot , and then luck went back on me." 

A. C. Wilson. 



fSlo^s and ^ommfn-ts 



WHEN WILL THE INDEX BE OUT? 

How delighted I was the first time I heard that 
query 1 It sent a thrill of pride all over me. Surely 
I was receiving the reward for my sleepless nights. 
Yet, I don't know why I should have felt that way. 

On my way down town the next day I heard again 
that joyful inquiry and the sound was like melody to 
my listening ears. I felt kindly toward the inquisitor 
and I stopped and talked with him. One always 
likes to meet a person who wishes to know how you 
are getting along. 



Now and then, another would ask, and the question 
was agreeable to me ; I was glad to think that already 
some were interested. 

As the phrase became more common it pleased 
me and I smilingly answered all questions. Once, a 
friend stopped me with the words on his lips, but, 
already late to the recitation I hurried on without 
replying. If he thought I was angry with him, he 
was mistaken for I was not. 

Later, I met a number of freshmen descending the 
hill and they all asked me that inquisition as one man, 
when we were passed they inquired once more — this 
time very loudly — and then sang the words to music. 
I confess this slightly irritated me, however, I minded 
it but little. 

For a week or so everything went smoothly when I 
noticed that somehow that expression caused me 
some annoyance. Very likely it was a temporary dis- 
like and would soon pass away. One dark evening, 
suffering with a fierce headache, I was returning from 
supper when someone ran plump into me. As I 
slowly picked myself up, the ill-mannered wretch 
cried " Is that you ? Say, when will the Index be out ?" 
For the first time, perhaps, I answered harshly, for I 
told him it was none of his business. 

I now heard it very often, and, for a certainty my 
dislike had not diminished. One student asked ten 
times in ten hours ; his room-mate, once in ten days. 
I told this news-seeker that I would inform him im- 
mediately the books arrived. He grinned and sug- 
gested that the books might have been shipped to 
Amherst, N. H. This riled me a good deal but I 
managed to withhold my temper. The following 
morning as soon as he caught sight of me he turned 
around and threw out a string of interrogation marks 
long enough to tangle any college professor. Unable 
to stand it long I gave him a left-hander which checked 
his infernal noise for fifteen minutes. I firmly believe 
my action was justifiable and my only regret was that 
I had not acted oftener. 

One day a bright-eyed maiden sweetly inquired, 
"When will \he Index he out?" Controlling myself 
with difficulty I politely requested her to restrict her 
questions to paper and mail them to me next Christ- 
mas. 

There was something strange about that question. 
It began to run through my brain night and day untihi 



76 



AGGIE LIFE. 



could no longer study nor could I sleep. I wondered 
if there was anything the matter with me. Some- 
times I felt I was not responsible for what I did and 
at times I did not care. Continually I heard that 
buzzing, piercing question. Even the chapel bell 
seemed to ask " When-n-n will the In-rt-n-dex be 
ou-u-u-t ?" I stuffed my ears with cotton and hid 
myself in the darkest corner of my room, yet, still it 
pursued me. Oh, how I wanted to go somewhere 
out of reach of that incessant din ! But where ? 

A gray-haired member of the faculty asked me to 
call ; he wanted to discuss an important matter. 
There, I would not hear that ever-ringing bell, so I 
gladly went. After helping me off with my coat, the 
first thing he said was, " 1 understand your class is 
publishing a larger book than usual, When will the 
Index he ou\.y Heavens, I could have killed him 
with one look, yet I spared him, I don't know why. 

Yesterday when 1 entered the class-room the entire 
class stood up in their chairs and yelled that awful 
interrogation until it shook the building. I could have 
choked them all in one grasp. Ah, then they would 
howl ! What I did then — well, it does not matter 
but in my room last night my head swam and I seemed 
to fall through space . . . down ... oh, so far and 
everything so dark. Huge black figures brandishing 
long pronged spears were constantly swarming about 
me, dancing and leaping, now here, now there, yet 
steadily closing in around me and all the while scream- 
ing at the top of their voices, " When will the Index 
be out?" I was not afraid of them, they did not dare 
to hurt me. But they made nie mad with their 
Index — Index — how I hate that word. I tore it from 
my dictionary this morning quicker than could the 
lightning, then I burned it. How I laughed to see it 
writhe and squirm as the flame licked up its life 
blood. There they are ! Watch them sneak up be- 
hind me 1 I know what they are after ; they are try- 
ing to drown me. They must catch me first. Ha ! 
Ha I The alumni are lost- — a postal came to-day — I 
will scratch their eyes out. They will freeze and 
become stiff like Lot — Ha! ha! Blood and salt — 
They will find their homes when the Index — come out 
Index, I will tear you into ten thousand toothpicks and 
eat you. Ah, what do I care ! They will torment 
me will they ! I hope it never comes out — I will run 
—for two weeks — it will never catch me — 



Editor's Note. — This unfinished article was found 
among the notes of an Index editor whose trials were 
more than his feeble brain could bear. 

* * 

* 

Why is it that the short winter courses do not ap- 
peal to more of the young men of the state ? There 
are to be found in every town young men who desire 
just such opportunities. Frequently they are pre- 
vented by circumstances from devoting four entire 
years to extending their education ; but while they are 
hard at work during the summer, they could easily 
spend eleven weeks during the middle of the winter. 
Many young men realizing the advantages v/hich 
would come to them with a better knowledge of their 
work, devote their long winter evenings to study in 
their own homes. They are necessarily handicapped 
by lack of material to work with and by being depend- 
ent entirely upon their own efforts. Here they will 
find a number of courses of study which are so ar- 
ranged as to give them the most practical knowledge 
possible within so limited a time, but the studies of 
one year may be continued in succeeding years if 
desired. Here they will find an excellent library 
which is an invaluable aid in any course. Here they 
will find laboratories thoroughly fitted for use. Those 
who desire to become more thoroughly acquainted 
with animal husbandry will find the Barn and Dairy- 
school of incalculable benefit. When it is consid- 
ered that all these advantages may be had free and 
that it costs the young men taking these courses but 
little more to live here than it does at their own homes, 
we cannot understand v/hy more do not improve these 
opportunities. 



Is it not possible this term, for us to pay more at- 
tention to athletics than we have in the past? Much 
interest was shown in the track team last spring and 
if we hope to make that a success this year, now is the 
time to train. We all know that indoor training in a 
gymnasium thoroughly prepares a man for most kinds 
of athletics. Although we lack apparatus, yet an im- 
mense amount of benefit can be derived from hard 
practice and the proper use of what we do possess. A 
series of indoor meets could be held during this term 
which would bring out much new talent. Thus new 



AGGIE LIFE. 



11 



interest and enthusiasm would be awakened in ath- 
letics which would prove to be in everyway profitable 
to the college. 



It is evident that there is much interest taken, in 
polo this winter. The Freshmen have shown their 
spirit in this line and are to be commended for the 
good work they have done. Although the weather 
has not been very favorable for practice, yet consid- 
ering the condition of the ice the men have made 
a good start. Class games are to be arranged and 
a schedule of games with other colleges should be 
made. The College team will soon be selected and 
regular practice commenced. We have many ad- 
vantages for polo here and we trust that the polo 
team will have the support of the whole college. 



The present indications show that the class of 1901 
will offer a very strong front at polo this season. The 
team has played several practice games with the 
Junior and Sophomore teams, and in all of these 
has made a good showing. The candidates are 
Ahearn and Paul, rushes ; Dorman, center ; Macom- 
ber, half-back; and Dickerman, goal. Gordon is an 
able player, but is not trying to earn a place on the 
five. With this team and by dint of much practice 
the Freshmen have some hopes of defeating the invin- 
cible (?) Sophs, contrary to the predictions of M. H. 
Munson, the polo expert, who in spite of the frac- 
tured state of the 1900 team, still predicts the utter 
defeat and annihilation of the voluble Freshmen. 



olle^f ^otf$, 



— 1898. 

— Hurrah for the New Year ! 

— New Year resolves are much in evidence. 

— W. S. Fisher '98 has been elected leader of the 
choir. 

— E. H. Sharpe ex-'99 has returned to College for 
the short course. 

— On account of sickness Lieut. Wright has not 
been able to return to his work. 

— Professor Cooley has returned from Wisconsin 
and has charge of the Dairy School. 



— C. W. Smith '99 has left College and expects to 
go to the Mass. Institute of Technology. 

— C. E. Risley has left the class of 1900 in good 
standing and has entered the short winter course. 

— Friday evening Jan. 21 a dance will be given in 
the Drill Hall by Professor Petit's dancing class. 
Everybody should take advantage of the opportunity 
to get in a little practice before the Military Ball. 

— The text books in Sophomore Physiology and 
Surveying have been changed. The Physiology text- 
book now used is a larger and more recent edition of 
" Martin's Human Body," the Surveying text-book is 
'• Raymond's Plane Surveying." 

— At a recent meeting of the trustees of the College 
it was decided to ask of the Legislature among other 
things that the three men in the Senior class recom- 
mended as best prepared in Military Science be made. 
Brevet 2nd Lieutenants in the State militia. 

— Very few people not in the short course appreci- 
ate its value. If it were generally known what a good 
course this is there would undoubtedly be much larger 
classes. This is a course for practical business men, 
not for boys who do not want to do good hard work. 

— Military drill during the winter term is as a rule 
monotonous. This winter the monotony of the man- 
ual of arms is interrupted by Butt's rifle exercises. 
These exercises are particularly valuable in building 
up the body and taking off superfluous avoirdupois, 
besides making a very pretty drill. 

— Geo. F. Parmenter 1900 has passed success- 
fully through the crisis of a very serious surgical 
operation. Friday Jan. 7 it was found that, after an 
illness of only a day or two, he showed unmistakable 
signs of appendicitis, so on the following afternoon he 
was removed to the Pratt hospital. He is now on the 
road to recovery and his many friends unite in extend- 
ing to him their hearty congratulations. 

— We hope to see the Veterinary department of 
the College improved by a new laboratory and infirm- 
ary for animals. This infirmary shall consist of five or 
six stalls, each being entirely separate from the oth- 
ers. The most approved hygienic and sanitary meth- 
ods will be used and it will make a very suitable place 
to quarantine a sick horse or cow. A new laboratory 
will be especially appreciated as the present quarters 
are very insufficient. 



^8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— On Dec. 16th, 1897, the local chapter of the 
Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity sent Geo. H. Wright '98 
as a delegate to the Induction of Theta Chapter at 
Columbia University. The Induction was held at 
Hollender's 125th St.. New York city. Delegates 
were present from Yale, Cornell, Union, and the Col- 
lege of the City of New York. An excellent banquet 
followed the business part of the meeting and toasts 
and songs were in order. At last in view of the fact 
that there was another day coming the meeting 
disbanded. 

— At a meeting of the base ball association last 
Friday afternoon Geo. H. Wright '98 was elected 
manager in place of J. R. Dutcher who has left Col- 
lege to enter Columbia University. It was advocated 
that an assistant business manager be elected by the 
College at large, to assist the business manager and 
become acquainted with the duties of the position and 
at the graduation or retirement of the manager to 
assume control of the property of the association. It 
will be understood that in all probability the assistant 
will succeed to the managership. 

— The chief social event of the winter term in 
former years has been the Military Bail. But last 
year owing to a lack of enthusiasm it was not deemed 
advisable to hold this promenade, This year, how- 
ever, there seems to be a greater demand for it. 
The large dancing class under the charge of Profes- 
sor Petit has made rapid strides in the graceful art 
and is enthusiastic over the prospects. For those 
who do not dance it has heretofore been the custom 
to hold a purely social affair in the early part of the 
evening. The military side of our education has 
always been a popular thing with the girls and for this 
reason should not be neglected. 

— The report of the board which surveyed the Con- 
necticut River between Holyoke and Hartford has 
been submitted to Congress. The plan presented 
provides for securing between Holyoke and Hartford 
a channel 150 feet wide and 9 feet deep at extreme 
low water by constructing three locks and movable 
dams. The cost is estimated at $1,825,000, but this 
total would be increased to $2,075,000 should the 
chanoine type of dams be used, while the cost of 
maintenance et'c, is estimated at $8,000 per year. 
The plans involve no injury to the canal on the west 
bank, or to water power, and the eleven bridges 



between Hartford and Chicopee, which would not per- 
mit traffic under the proposed project, is referred to. 
Water carriage to the United States arsenal at 
Springfield is cited and the improvement urged in 
view of the commercial importance of the river. If 
this project is carried through the freight rates from 
Holyoke to New York will be immensely cheapened. 



\umr\i. 



THE ANNUAL DINNER 

of the Massachusetts Alumni Club will be held at the 
United States Hotel in Boston next Friday, Jan. 21, 
at 7 o'clock p. M. Business meeting at 6-30 p. m-. 
All former students of the College are cordially and 
earnestly requested to be present. An enthusias- 
tic gathering is expected. 

'77. — Henry F. Parker, the son of Professor H. E. 
Parker^ who taught at this institution from 1870 to 
1879., died recently from injuries received in a fall 
from a bicycle. Mr. Parker was a prominent patent 
lawyer, living in Brooklyn. He was thirty-nine years 
old and leaves a widow and two children. 

'72. — Charles O. Flagg, Kingston R. I., Director 
R. I. Agricultural Experiment Station, Master R. 
I. State Grange. 

'Ex-'72. — Fred W. Morris, New York city, donates 
56 volumes miscellaneous subjects to the college 
Library. 

73.— James H. Webb, Ailing, Webb & More- 
house., Attorney and Counsellor at Law, also Instruc- 
tor of Law, Yale University. Address, Corner 69 
Church and Crown streets. New Haven, Conn. 

'74 — Asa W. Dickinson, Exchange place, Jersey 
City, N. J., lawyer, Dickinson, Thompson & Mac- 
Master '96 B. Sc. Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

'76. — Joseph F. Barnet with Bowker Fertilizer Co., 
27 Beaver street. New York City. 

'78.— Sanford D. Foot, 100 Reade St, New York 
City, Secretary of Karney & Foot & Co., File and 
Rasp manufacturers. 

81. — Elmer D. Howe, Fairview Farm, Marlboro, 
Mass. 

'82. — Herbert Myrick with Orange Judd Co., 
Springfield, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



79 



'82. — William H. Bishop, Newark, Del., Professor 
of agriculture and biology at Delaware Agricultural 
College. 

'87. — Thomas F. Meehan, Meehan & Wallace, 
counsellors at law, Room 345 Tremont Building, 
73 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

'87. — Chas. H. Watson, eastern manager for Swift 
& Co., wool exchange. West Broadway and Beach 
Street, New York City. 

'88. — Herbert C. Bliss, Attleboro, Mass., traveling 
salesman with Bliss Bros. 

'88. — Wilfred A. Parsons, Southampton, farmer. 

'88. — "Yataro Viscount Mislina, sitting in house of 
Lords, Japanese Parliament. Address, Kajimachi, 
Tokio, Japan. 

'89. — Burt S. Hartwell, Kingston, R. I., assistant 
chemist, R. I. Experiment Station. 

'89. — George A. Adams, druggist, 46 Mason St. 
Boston, Mass. 

'89. — Charles S. Crocker, married to Mary Eleanor 
Gaylord, at North Amherst, Dec. 29, 1897, 



'90.— F. W. Mossman, Durham, N. H. and Bur- 
lington, Vt., Professor in charge of Dairy School. 

'90. — Truman P. Felton, West Berlin, Mass.. 
farmer. 

'90. — Frank 0. Williams, Sunderland, Mass., 
farmer. 

'91.— Malcom A. Carpenter, 215 Arlington St., Mt. 
Auburn, Mass, with Olmstead & Eliot, Landscape 
Architects, of Brookline, Mass. 

'93.— John R. Perry, with Perry & Whitney. 
Address, 8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

'94. — Frederick L. Green, Box 266, Southampton, 
Long Island, landscape gardener. 

'94. — Arteus J. Morse, Professor of Mathematics 
and sciences at St. Austin's school. West New 
Brighton, N. Y. 

'94- — Lowell Manley, superintendent Weld Farm, 
West Roxbury, Mass. 

'94. — Louis M. Barker, Hanson, Mass., transit 
man, Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn R. R. 

'94. — Charles H. Higgins, M. D., Dover Mass. 




i 



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bar post fastenings, self-oiling bearings, low frames and low crank hanger drop, nar- 
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Stearns Chainless $125.00 

Stearns Specials 75. 00 

Stearns Yellow Fellows 50.00 

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8o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'94. — Edwin H. Alderman, Westfield, Mass., mar- 
ket gardner and florist. 

'95, — Clarence B. Lane, New Brunswick, N. J., 
assistant in Dairy Agricultural Experiment Station. 

'96. — Editor Tsuda has recently published four 
copies of the Japanese Agriculturalist. One of these 
copies contains A. H.Kirkland's bulletin on the toad, 
while one of the others consists of the dangers of the 
gypsy moth. 

'97. — C. F. Palmer, East Fairfield, Me., Teacher, 
Good Will Farm. 

}£x-'97.— J. R. Eddy, Washington, D. C, 1104 
New Hampshire Ave. 




Trade Marks 

Designs 

Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 



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culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, f 1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

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Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 

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To the class of '97 M. A. C. MAKES A SPECIALTY 
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Reut allowed towards the purchase price. 

ALL KINDS or TYPEWRITEPS AND SUPPLIES 

in stock. When ordering SUPPLIES send us name and number of your TYPEWRITER. 

Send for latest catalogue of 

NEW FRANKLIN TYPEWRITER, PRICE $7500. 
CUTTEIR TOWEIR CO., 

12 A. Milk Street, . . . BOSTON, MASS. 

Established 1845. Tel. 2423. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationeiy, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, larccst and best. Our prices lowest. 

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13 




VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST, MASS., FEBRUARY 2, IJ 



NO. 7 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 

Terms $1.0P per year In advance. Singh copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Randall D. Warden. '98, Editor-in-Chief. 

Alexander Montgomery, Jr., '98. Business Manager. 

Frederick H. Turner, '99, Ass't Business Man.'lger. 
George H. Wright, '98. Willis S. Fisher, '98. 

Avedis G. Adjemian, '98. Warren E. Hinds, '99. 
William H. Armstrong, '99. Charles A. Crowell, Jr., "00. | 
George F. Parmenter. '00. James E. Halligan, '00. 

Communications should 



Early in the coming spring there is to be held, in 
one of the leading clubs of New York city, a reunion 
of American gentlemen who were formerly students 
at the University of Goettingen in Germany. The 
committee of arrangements consists of J. Pierpont 
Morgan, president, Prof. Chandler of Columbia Uni- 
versity, and Prof. Hildegrade of the University of 
California. One of the most prominent guests at this 
gathering will be Dr. Charles A. Goessmann of this 
college. For several years Dr. Goessmann was pro- 
fessor of Chemistry at the University of Goettingen. 
During that time Prof. Chandler, Prof. Hildegarde 



students and Alumni are requested to contribute, 
be addressed to Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ' and Prof. Caldwell Of Comell and many Other illuS- 
ordered and arrears paid. 
Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to' triOUS chemistS of tO-day Were among his pupils. It 

^^^^-^ — ^ — anagei\ -^ j .^ yndcrstood that the Doctor's former students look 

I forward to this meeting with their old master with the 

w. s. Fisher, Pres.j greatest of pleasure. It would seem that the doctor 



tV,?,'!t\\A5.»- V »iJ»^*ONJ'a%^ '(?.\\\T,t'i.S>. 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 
Y. M. C. A. 
Athletic Association. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
Base-Ball Association. 
College Boarding Club. 
Reading-Room Association, . 
Ninety-Nine Index, 



R. D. Warden, ^Mariager.' i was as popular with his early students as he has been 

G. H. Wright, Manager. I .,, r. . j . . .v.- i 

J. p.Nickerson, Sec. j With his studcnts in this countrv, 

J. S. Eaton, Manager, j 
p. A. Beaman, Manager. — -: ■- — 



flToriaiSa 



I On Friday evening the 21st of January was held in 
Boston at the United States hotel the annual reunion 
There is an old proverb which reads " Many small °^ the alumni of the Mass. Agricultural College. At 
make a great." Surely our library is great in its this meeting there came up for discussion a question 
number of well chosen books in every department ; ^^ich has engrossed the attention of those interested 
great in its attractiveness, great initsmany-other con- h" the college for several years; a question which 
veniences, but one small thing is lacking- and that is | ^^^^s strongly before the alumni gathered at the 
good, comfortable chairs. The editor does not mean " Great Kommers " held last commencement. The 



high polished expensive ones, but chairs in which one 
can sit comfortably for two or three hours and thor- 
oughly enjoy ones books, without being obliged to leave 
the chair on account of its hardness or uncomfort- 
ableness. Surely many small things are present that 



representative of the Life who was present at this 
reunion has, in what follows, presented as nearly as 
possible, what seemed to hi.m the weightier side of 
the argument. Space will not permit even a review 
of what was said by the speakers, nor could we come 



tend to make our library very useful and very attrac- | to any definite conclusion, with what for the most 
tiveandthe removal of the old and substitution of ! P^rt, proved to be mere assertion or scathing sarcasm, 
new and more comfortable chairs in our college | but, the writer here presents, not the assertions which 
library will tend to make it more attractive, more use- ' §o to prove naught, but a few facts which can be 
ful and greater. '■ proved and which we trust will carry a due amount of 



82 



AGGIE LliJ*^. 



conviction to those not too enthusiastic over the culti- 
vation of their hobby. The question as discussed be- 
fore the meeting, resolves itself into " Would the inter- 
est of the College be advanced by a change of name ?" 
This question grew out of the fact that during the his- 
tory of the thirty years' existence of this College.about 
two-thirds of the men who have been students here, 
have adopted walks in life, other than agricultural ; * 
and that their old Alma Mater could accomplish a far 
greater mission, among the public of the state, if the 
purposes for which the college was founded, could be 
more explicitly stated in its name. For this reason 
the following name has been suggested by Mr. Bowker, 
7 1 , — to whom we are indebted for many ideas herein 
expressed : — The Mass. College of Applied Science 
and Agriculture. Thirty-one years ago the M. A. C. 
first opened its doors to students, in the ^ords of the 
Morrill Bill, " To teach such branches of learning as 
are related to agriculture and mechanic arts . . . with- 
out excluding other scientific and classical studies . . . 
in order to permit the liberal and practical education of 
the industrial classes in the several pursuits and profes- 
sions of life." Does it mean what it says or not ? The 
college, without those who came from other places 
than the farm, v/ould have been a rank failure long 
before this. Can this be disputed ? True we have 
our Institute of Technology together with our classical 
instituitons, but are these over crowded ? Do they 
reach the masses of the people ? Do you think that 
this college is fulfilling the mission for which she was 
founded with her present scanty numbers ? It is at this 
point that we reach our discussion. All must agree 
to the following statements : First, that to promote 
the best interests of the college students are needed. 
Second, Money is needed. Our question then re- 
solves itself into : — 1st, Will a change of name tend 
to increase the attendance of students ? This we will 
proceed to answer. It is a generally admitted fact 
that as the college now stands before the public it is 
ridiculously unknown and unheard of, even in its own 
state. The mistakes made by people referring to the 
college are often ludicrously wrong, and misconcep- 
tions of the work and routine of the student frequent. 
It is common to find people who believe that simply 
agriculture, as regard to the methods of planting, 
cultivating and harvesting crops, is taught, — of course 
they have a very meagre idea of some science con- 



nected with the operation. That this college is not 
merely an agricultural school we know ; and if people 
have got hold of that idea it must have been 
surmised from the name, which in itself, to the 
uninformed, hardly admits any other branch of science 
to the curriculum. Now then, supposing that the 
college was represented by those who were merely 
looking for a practical agricultural training, so that it 
would repay the Government for the money spent in 
educating them, all might be well, but this is not the 
case. Statistics tell us that there are 36000 farmers in 
in the state, but the catalogue shows, not ten farmers 
are represented in each class at the college. Talk 
about the farmers supporting the college and sendmg 
their sons here to be trained ! Why it is a most 
absurd statement' and one that can not be backed up 
by the records of our yearly attendance. Even the 
mother and sisters of the farmer boy council him to 
seek an education that will lead him away from the 
farm, which from experience, they have learned to be 
a life full of labor and hardship. Thus far we have 
shown, 1st, that the college is not widely known, 2nd, 
that the name does not convey a clear idea of the 
scope of thecurrciculum,3rd,that even with the present 
name it does not have the support and attendance of 
the farming part of the community. We will now take 
for an illustration of what a change of name has done, 
the present University of Maine. Founded under the 
name of the State College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Artsf it gradually came to be designated 
the Maine State College, and as such became known 
throughout N. E. until recently it was decided that the 
college could more satisfactorily accomplish the work 
for which it was founded under a broader, and to the 
public, a more alluring name. In Mr. Bowker's words 
" I have found in a more or less extended business 
career that it is impossible to force any article, whose 
name is in the leastways objectionable,upon the public." 
Any experienced business man knows the truth of this 
statement. Those who know the early history and 
discouraging growth of the University of Maine, know 
how severe was the struggle, and how absolute the 
failure, to maintain the college in any degree of popu- 
larity, with the original name given in the Morrill 
Bill. We come now to the second part of our dis- 
cussion. — Would the college lose the support of the 
legislature in its appropriations to the college ? Not 



AGGIE LIFE. 



83 



if the legislators act according to the wishes of the 
people by whom they are chosen. If by a change of 
name you can thereby dispell the odium of public 
sentiment, draw a^ay the influence which mothers and 
sisters now wield in directing their sons and brothers to 
Harvard, Amherst or Tufts, bring forth the truth that 
there is not another college in the land where the 
natural sciences and biology can be more thoroughly 
studied, if by the means you can increase the attend- 
ance and cause the college to become more popular 
throughout the state, need we fear loosing the support 
of the legislature ? In the words of Levi Stockbrdge, 
" The heart, soul and life of the college is most 
materially changed since its early days, (it would be 
said if it had not) and not for the better." This last 
is a broad assertion and whatever may be its value, we 
cannot but admit that the counter-current has set in 
strong and heavy and from present indications is des- 
destined to increase in force and volume. One has 
only to visit the college to find out the predominating 
opinion among the undergraduates. In the words of a 
former article we await the outcome with no little 
interest. 



*Gen. Catalog M. A. C. 1 867-97. 

tNew England Official Directory and Handbook, 1878-79. State A gr, 
report of Me., series 1870. 



ALPHONSE DAUDET. 

On the sixteenth day of last December there died 
in Paris, after a lingering illness of about two years, a 
writer whose fame had become international, whose 
name was honored wherever it was known, and whose 
works found an ever ready sale among a book-loving 
public. 

Born in the cathedral town of Nimes, in Langedoc, 
on May 13, 1840, Alphonse Daudet first saw the 
beauties of that France he came to love so well in 
after life. His father, dying while the embryonic 
novelist was still young, the youth was throv/n upon 
his own resources which were meagre and slender in 
the extrenhe. His first experience towards earning a 
■ livelihood took place when in the College d'Alais, at 
Lyons, which has become imortalized in that pathetic 
description of the " Geuex de Province," he felt the 
miseries and sufferings incident to the career of an 
usher in a public school. 

In 1857 he went to Paris, where an elder brother 



was a reporter on numerous Parisian papers. He had 
an exceedingly small sum of money but was blessed with 
a rather large amount of poems which he finally suc- 
ceeded in publishing under the title of " Les Amou- 
reuses," but not until the brothers had suffered the 
most horrible poverty. This book sold well and 
brought the young author's name to the attention 
of Empress Eugenie who provided for him a posi- 
tion as private secretary to the Due de Morny, in which 
position he remained five years. 

In 1831 appeared a poem entitled '• La Double 
Conversion" which was followed in 1853 by " Les 
Roman du Chaperon Rouge," a collection of articles 
which had appeared in Figaro. The following years 
were ones of great prosperity : the poor garret author 
had risen, phoenix-like, into the best known man in 
all Paris, but in spite of his growing popularity and the 
great demand made upon his time. Alphonse Daudet 
was the most accessible writer in all that gay Parisian 
capitol. 

Among the better known of this versatile authors 
works may be named " Le Petit Chase," " Tartarin 
de Tarascon," that classic which for a time suggested 
the birth of another Munchausen in its wonderful 
adventures and in its ludicrous scenes ; " Les Rois en 
Exil ;" " Robert Helmont ;" the delightful story of a 
recluse during the German invasion: " Lettres de 
mon Moulin," the day dreams of an idler ; " Les 
Contes Choises ;" " Fromont-Jeune et Risler Aine," 
for which he was awarded a prize by the French 
Academy in 1875, besides many others, all treated in 
that delightful style which has characterized the man 
as a prose-poem writer. 

After Dickens, there comes no more prolific writer 
than this charming Frenchman, and it is almost with a 
feeling of personal loss that one reads of his death. 
Those who have read " Sapho," that book which 
marked the apogee of his fame, will mourn the loss 
of one dearer than a friend ; for in this story the 
author's delicate touch and great human love can 
only impress his reader with that respect and esteem, 
which comes after the first throes of enthusiasm have 
passed away, and is as lasting as Time itself. No 
truer painting of Nature has ever graced the literature 
of any land, and the whole book, is as Daudet once 
wrote of it himself, " aflame with life and dealing with 
terrible things, most carefully expressed," 



84 



AGGIE LIFE. 



To turn to "Jack" is like courting sorrow and 
black despair. For thrilling experiences, that are 
destined to wreck all human hope and ambition, there 
is, perhaps, no tale which is calculated to burden the 
soul as is this same "Jack:" yet through all the 
sorrows and sufferings of this hero, strong in manliness 
and in courage indomitable, one perceives the thread 
of human endeavor battling against overwhelming cir- 
cumstances, buoyed up by the hope of a more peace- 
ful to-morrow, which proves in the end as fatuous as 
any will-o-the-wisp. And yet, what a lesson of human 
endurance and divine faith is told by the life of this 
poor " Ouvrier!" How very true it is a " Historie 
d'un Ouvrier!" 

To treat separately each work of this gifted man 
would require volumes, "and a critical encomium would 
be too lengthy for such an article as this, but to omit 
the dramas of Daudet, at least in their entirety, would 
be unseemingly neglect. As a dramatist, Alphonse 
Daudet would hardly be classed as successful, yet 
some of the many play she wrote will last as classics, and 
among these may be named, — " L'Arlesienne " and 
" Lise Tavernier," both of which were at first inac- 
ceptable to the French public. 

As a man, Daudet was simple in taste and unosten- 
tatious in manner : there was a certain boyish exuber- 
ance of spirit that he brought with him from the land 
of the south and which never left him, but this was 
tempered by his northern blood which so often 
asserted itself in his writings. It was a rare intellect- 
ual treat to hear Daudet converse at table or at his 
adorable wife's "at home " on a Wednesday evening 
or a Sunday morning. There was a certain Bohemian 
air about the writer that charmed his listener ; an air 
which he must have obtained from that dingy Latin 
Quarter when he and his brother starved together like 
rats. 

Habit had made him an observer, not only of the 
vulgarly real in nature, but of its poetic tendencies and 
its unfulfilled mission. His sentiment was true and 
sure, his humor unctuous ; his quickness to perceive 
the ludicrous in the pathetic, and the pathetic when 
embodied in the absurd may have been the cause of 
so closely connecting his name with that of Dickens. 
It was not with photographic accuracy that Daudet 
drew his characters, although each and every one of 
them had its counterpart in actual life, but he took the 



real ground work as he found it and modelled his 
puppets to meet his own ideals. 

Unlike Zola, with whom he has been so often 
classed, Daudet was a great admirer of his English 
prototype : he did not deem Dickens and Scott so 
" immoral " as does Zola, (by " immoral " Zola does 
not mean that indecency with which many of the later 
writers attack the living questions, but that insincerity 
to what is true in life : seeing the truth and yet not 
daring to tell it as he sees it: which is immorality 
from the point of the realist) and herein Daudet may 
have erred. Yet we shall always love the author of 
" Sapho '■ for his delicate touch, his love of light, 
his reverence of youth and all the beauties that it 
brings, we shall treasure his name as one who pleased 
us with his " Trente Ans de Paris," astonished us with 
" Le Nabab Moeurs Parisennes," and who caused us 
to weep over the awful fate of " Jack." " Salvette." 

APPENDICITIS— THE LASEST FAD. 

Have you got the new disorder ? 
If you hiaven't 'tis in order 

To succumb to it at once v/itiiout delay. 
It is called appendicitis, ... 

Very different from gastritis, 

Or the common trash diseases of the day. 

It creats a happy frolic. 
Something like a winter colic, 

That has often jarred oui inner organs some. 
Only wrestles with the wealthy, 
And the otherwise most healthy, 

Having got it, then you're nigh to kingdom come. 

Midway down in your intestine. 
Its interstices infestin'. 

It's a little alley, blind and darlc as night, 
Leading off to simple nowhere. 
Catching all stray things that go there. 

As a pocket it is simply out of sight. 

It is prone to stop and grapple 
With the seed of grape or apple. 

Or a solder button swallowed with your pie. 
Having levied on these chattels. 
Then begin eternal battles 

That are apt to end in mansions in the sky. 

Once located, never doubt it, 
You would never be without it. 

It's a fad among society that's gay ; 
Old heart failure and paresis 
Have decamped and gone to pieces. 

And dyspepsia has fallen by the way. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



85 



Then stand back there diabetis, 
For here comes appendicitis. 

With a brood of minor troubles on the wing. 
So vermiform, here's a hoping 
You'll withstand all drastic doping, 

And earn the appellation, " Uncrowned King." 



THE VISION IN PINK. 

I was lying on my back, gazing listlessly far out to 
sea. Not a cloud was visible, and the heat of the 
summer's sun, now about two hours past the meridian, 
made me feel so drowsy that I knev/ if I should lie 
there on the rocks much longer I would surely fall 
asleep. 

Hearing a crash on my right, I turned my head, 
only to see another load of paving-stones being added 
to the thousands already on the pier awaiting shipment 
on the morrow. This had no interest for me, and I 
slowly turned my gaze in the opposite direction, where, 
before me, stretched the long, level beach, from which 
the hot air rose in wavering lines. I heard in the dis- 
tance the laughter and shouts of the bathers, but the 
sounds seemed indistinct and vague ; and from the 
hotel, a few rods behind me, came the soft, sweet 
vibrations of music, which, united with the rythmic 
roar of the breakers, soothed my wandering thoughts 
into pleasant dream.s. 

Had you been in my place a few moments later, 
and had you seen what I saw, your heart would have 
felt the same thrill of joy that mine felt. It was only 
such a sight as might be met with at any summer 
resort and yet it awakened within me a feeling I had 
never experienced before. A beautiful young girl 
attired m a dress of dreamy pink, hatless, with a para- 
sol over her right shoulder, and the gentle sea breezes 
tossing her fluffy hair — such was the picture that 
arrested my attention. 

She was coming toward me. Perhaps she was 
making for the very rocks upon which I was lying and 
I waited with an anxiety I knew I had no right to feel. 
But no, she passed behind the rocks, so that I turned 
my head only to see her disappear. She had not even 
noticed me, yet something told me that we should 
meet again. 

The next evening a ball was given at the principal 
hotel. Of course I went — for everybody did, and of 
course I went alone — for everybody else did not. So 
the world has always treated me ; perhaps it is because 



I have too wandering a disposition, or perhaps, which 
is more likely, it is because I am considered just a 
little bashful. So, you see, I am always obliged to 
attend such entertainments alone. 

I knew very few people there and went more out of 
curiosity than with any expectation to participate in 
the enjoyment of the evening. You can imagine, 
then, my joyful surprise when, on entering the ball- 
room, I saw the young lady of the day before, whirling 
about in the mazes of a waltz. I watched as she 
came round again to see who her partner might be. 
Surely I could not be mistaken — no ; it was a gentle- 
man with whom I was on quite intimate terms. He 
ga"ve me a nod of recognition as he passed, and was 
out of sight again behind the other dancers. " 

At the end of that waltz, my friend came to me 
and asked me if I did not intend to dance. I told him 
my situation and he offered to get a partner for me. 
Perhaps it was because he saw me looking inquiringly 
at his last partner that he offered to give me the next 
dance with her; at any rate, he led me to her and 
introduced me. I cannot remember to this day what 
I said, but I do know that she gladly gave me the next 
number, a waltz. And that waltz, I can never forget 
it. It seemed as if I were floating along on a gold- 
lined cloud with my toes never touching it. The 
music stopped. It seemed as if we had just started, 
yet it was all over. 

I conducted her to the refreshment table and helped 
her to a glass of frappe. The room seemed warm 
and close — I began to feel dizzy — something cold 
struck me in the face, and — I awoke to find the rain 
falling on my face, and myself lying on the rocks near 
the beach. D. '01. 



©■tes and ^omir^fn'ts. 



The visitor at the dairy school will be shown some 
interesting things in the art of good butter-making. 
The equipment of this department is strictly up to date 
and includes many of the best machines that modern 
skill has been able to devise for turning out the fin- 
ished product of the dairy. There is the Standard 
No. 4 Babcock milk tester which is run at tremend- 
ous speed. A full series of the United States Sepa- 
rators may be seen. These range in capacity from 
two hundre4 to twenty-five hundred pounds of milk 



85 



A-GGiE L.1VK. 



per hour. Another large separator of the DeLaval 
type has just been added which has a capacity of 
twenty-five hundred pounds per hour. These big 
machines are a trifle too expensive to suit the pocket 
of the average dairyman as they cost about $500.00. 
After the cream has been separated, it is placed in 
the Disbrov/ combined churn and butter-worker. This 
churn is of western make and is rapidly coming into 
favor among progressive creamery-men on account of 
its many good qualities. It churns, washes and works 
the butter by successive processes without removing 
it from the machine. Many other interesting things 
might be mentioned had we the space. Mr. E. W. 
Curtis of Elgin, 111., has charge of the butter-making. 
Since completing his studies at the Kansas State Col- 
lege, he has acted as instructor in butter-making at 
the Wisconsin dairy school. Mr. Curtis is very pop- 
ular with his acquaintances and is highly commended 
by all who know his work. 



The freshmen have received their basket ball ap- 
paratus and are now hard at work trying to perfect 
themselves in the game. It is very probable that 
some interesting class games will be arranged very 
soon, as there is already quite an interest aroused 
among the men who have been over at the drill hall 
for several evenings lately. The freshmen have some 
promising material and with some practice will put up 
a strong team. Some of the candidates are Rice, 
center ; Dorman and Moulton, forwards ; Chickering, 
Graves, Cooke and Ahearn, backs. In basketball as 
in football it is the team work which makes the vic- 
tors. In this team Capt. Moulton has shown that he 
can put up a strong game at forward, as well as coach 
the team in an instructive way. We hope that this 
game will secure a strong foothold in this college, as 
it is a game which can be played at any time, regard- 
less of the weather. 



The trustees have voted that three of the depart- 
ments here shall be authorized to give a degree of Ph 
D. The professors at the heads of Entomological, 
Botanical and Chemical departments are allowed to 
give the degree to any one who has shown himself 
worthy of it. The course requires three years with 
one of these three as a major study and the other two 



as minors. This course is indeed a great improve- 
ment and will prove very attractive. The increasing 
number of our post-graduates makes it necessary to 
put our college on a level with other colleges by con- 
ferring a degree. There are fine opportunities for 
excellent work in all of these subjects. There is no 
better place in the country for the study of Entomol- 
ogy than here at Aggie, and the courses in Botany and 
Chemistry have been extended so as to make them 

extremely valuable to the student. 
* * 

The Massachusetts State Grange is an organiza- 
tion which takes a great interest in our institution and 
does much for its advancement. Last year its depu- 
ties, who are usually masters of different Granges in 
the state, were sent here to inspect the college. They 
came and were most favorably impressed with our 
many different departments. Going about among the 
different granges as they do, these deputies make it a 
point to speak a good word for the college. On Wed- 
nesday they will again visit us and examine our differ- 
ent lines of work. Among their number, this year, 
are Mr. Plumb, Mr. Fuller and Mr, Gifford, all grad- ■ 
uates of M. A. C. Mr. Gifford, who graduated in '94, 
has been a master of a Grange for two years and has 
taken an active interest in the college. The Grange 
is a very influential power in the state and at present 
is doing all in its power for the prosperity of the col- 
lege. We are pleased that the Grange shows its 
interest in the college, by sending its representatives 
here, to see for themselves what we are accomplish- 
ing. 

— Rubber boots are in the swim. 

— No general base ball practice will begin till after 
the Military Ball. 

— Our pulpit was supplied last Sunday by Rev. F. 
McKee White of Amherst. 

— We are pleased to see that Lieut. Wright is able 
to resume his official duties. 

— A. A. Boutelle '99 has been obliged to return to 
his home on account of sickness. 

— Dr. C. S. Walker delivered an address on " Tax- 
ation " ^t Shelburne last Saturday. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



87 



— Prof. C. H. Fernald was in Boston last week on 
business connected with the Gypsy Moth Commission. 

— The dancing class is getting in two lessons a 
week now in order to give more opportunity to prac- 
tise. 

— The freshman football team has elected Dorman 
captain and Brooks manager for their next season's 
team. 

— The freshmen have begun Basket Ball practice. 
It is their intention to meet other class teams that 
may be organized. 

— ^^Pres't Goodell is one of the lecturers in the 
course to be delivered before the Dickinson High 
School at Deerfield. 

— The freshmen threaten to bury the man that 
polices South College if the snow is not shovelled off 
the walk as far as West entry. 

— E. L. Macumber has been confined to his room 
for several days with a cold and sore throat, but has 
now sufficiently recovered to attend his classes. 

— The farm departrnent is cutting ice on the pond 
and filling the ice-house. The quality is rather poor 
on account of the large amount of snow frozen in with 
it. 

— Much credit is due to the assistant janitors for 
their promptness in clearing the walks from snow. A 
few hours after a snowstorm one can walk upon con- 
crete again. 

— A horse owned by Prof. Brooks and driven by 
his nephew, P. C. Brooks, took fright near the B. & 
M. station and ran through the town. P. C. Brooks 
is a freshman. 

— The following officers have been elected by the 
senior class for the winter term : Pres't A. G. Adje- 
mian ; vice pres't, A. Montgomery; sec. and treas., 
J. P. Nickerson. 

— Geo. F. Parmenter 1900 who was recently oper- 
ated upon for appendicitis has sufficiently recovered to 
return to his home. His classmate W. R. Crowell 
accompanied him. 

— The sophomores have elected the following class 
officers for the ensuing term : Pres't, A. D. Gile ; 
vice pres't, E. K.Atkins; sec'y and treas., E. T. 
Hull; polo capt., Otis; baseball capt., W. R. Crowell. 



— The Juniors have decided to give their Prom, 
next term and give the Military Ball a clear field this 
term. The Junior Prom, committee is as follows : 
W. H. Armstrong, Y. Canto, D. A. Beaman, F. H. 
Turner. 

— The juniors have elected the following class 
offtcers: Pres't, D. A. Beaman : vice pres't, B. H. 
Smith * sec'y, W. E. Chapin ; treas., H. E. Maynard ; 
class polo capt., W. E. Hinds ; reading room dirs.. 
Turner and Hinds. 

— Anybody wishing to have notes inserted under 
college notes can send the same to the college note 
editor. The sender's name must come with the note 
but will not be published unless desired. No anony- 
mous matter will be printed. 

— This year the Military Ball promises to be a 
greater success than ever before. These events have 
always been popular with both, students and faculty 
and the hearty way in which each cooperate to help, 
the other is a sure indication of success, 

— On Friday evening Jan. 21 a very pleasant 
informal dance was given in the Drill Hall by Prof. 
Petit's dancing class. About twenty couples were 
present. The patronesses were Mrs. H. D. Haskins 
and Mrs. E. A. Jones. Special cars ran to North 
Amherst and the town after the dance. 

— Those men who play basket ball in the Drill Hall 
must go it rather carefully while the electric chan- 
deliers are in place. After the Military Ball the lamps 
which are not protected by screens will be removed, 
and then there will be no further danger. Possibly If 
the lower classmen knew that the centre chandeliers 
were bought by, and belong to the students, they 
would be more careful. 

— On Wednesday evening Jan. 19 Major Henry E. 
Alvord gave an interesting lecture to the students. His 
subject " An account of the Battle of Cedar Creek. 
Va., Oct. 19, 1864" was highly entertaining. He 
also gave a graphic description of Gen. Sheridan's 
ride. The lecture was illustrated by stereopticon 
views, the reproduction of the officers' portraits being 
especially good. Maj. Alvord concluded by paying a 
touching tribute to Col. Charles R, Lowell who died 
so nobly for the nation's cause. 



88 



AGGIE LIFE. 



At a recent class meeting the Freshnfien elected 

the following officers ; Pres't, E. S. Ganfiwell ; vice 
pres't, T. Casey; sec'y and treas., W. C. Dickerman ; 
class cap't, Cooke ; serg't at arms. Graves ; historian, 
Leslie ; base ball cap't, Ahearn ; base ball manager, 
Barry; polo cap't and manager, H. A. Paul ; basket 
ball cap't. and manager, H. J. Moulton; tennis direc- 
tor, E. L. Macumber ; reading-room dir., F. E. 
Hemenway. 

— One matter that should not be overlooked is see- 
ing that the Drill Hall is properly lighted on the even- 
ing of Feb. 11. The centre lamps need to be con- 
nected v/ith some electricity. At the hop given on 
Jan. 21 one of the young ladies remarked that she 
was glad it was dark there because the light made 
her eyes weak. But we hope the eyes will be strong 
by the eleventh, and we want plenty of light. 

The Military Ball tommittee from the different 

societies is as follows: Q. T. V.. John P. Nickerson 
'98, Dan A. Beam.an '99 ; D. G. K., J. Styles Eaton 
'98, Ysidro Canto '99 ; C. S. C, Alexander Mont- 
gomery, Jr. '98, Fred H. Turner '99 ; * 2 K, Ran- 
dall D. Warden '98, E. Munroe Wright '99. The 
committee from the faculty are Profs. Mills and Wel- 
lington and Lieut. Wright. 

— Thursday Jan. 27 was set apart as a day of 
prayer for colleges. We had our customary hour of 
prayer, and to make it more beneficial it was compul- 
sory. Rev. Mr. Francis of Ludlow made a friendly 
talk to the students in a brotherly way. Prof. Tyler 
of Amherst College spoke a few words of good advice. 
Following Prof. Tyler was Mr. B. K. Jones '96 who 
made a short address, touching chiefly on the great 
importance of the Y. M. C. A. 

— We have heard wild rumors that an Agricultural 
club has been formed in College among a few of our 
worthy sons of toil who desire to obtain a deeper 
knowledge of the science of agriculture. We under- 
stand that the only Senior who was enrolled among its 
members was fortunate enough to escape on the night 
of Jan. 27 aided by three of his worthy classmates. 
The implements that made this miraculous escape 
possible are now on exhibition at No. 7 South Col- 
lege. Any member of the club desiring to withdraw 
before it is too late will obtain valuable information by 
applying to the Big Four Co-operative society of the 
senior class. 



— The equipment of the Dairy School has been 
enlarged by the addition of a combined churn and but- 
ter worker. This machine is the latest and most 
highly approved apparatus for butter making. The 
machine we have here is capable of handling from 
one hundred and twenty to one hundred and fifty 
pounds of butter. The most popular size with the 
large creameries will handle one thousand pounds of 
butter. Another new piece of apparatus is a dog or 
sheep treadmill for running a separator. 

Alumna. 



'7l. — E. B. Smead, principal of Watkinson Juve- 
nile Asylum and Farm School, Hartford, Conn. P. 
0. Box 965. 

Ex-75. — Ralph I. Taylor, afflicted with Klondicitis. 

Ex-'79. — Chas. H. Campbell, stock-breeder at 
Great Falls, Montana, visited the college Jan. 26. 

'82. — Burton A. Kinney representing Knowlton & 
Beach, paper box machinery, Rochester, N. Y. 

'83.— Homer H. Wheeler, Ph. D., Kingston, R. I. 
chemist, R. I. Experiment Station. 

'84. — Llewellyn Smith, removed to 24 Yale St., 
Springfield, Mass. 

'85.— Joel E. Goldthwait, M. D., 398 Marlboro 
St., Boston, Mass., physician. 

'86. — Charles F. Felt, Box 232, Galveston, Texas, 
chief engineer. Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railroad 
Co., also president Young Men's Christian Association, 
Galveston, Texas. 

'89. — C. S. Crocker and wife are stopping with 
friends in town. 

'90. — Fred J. Smith of the Gypsy Moth Commis- 
sion is enjoying a well earned vacation. 

'90. — John S. West, engaged on the Baptist Mes- 
senger, Chicago, 111. ■ _■ 

'91. — W. C. Paige, General Secretary of the 
Young Men's Christian Association, cor. First and 
Elm streets, Henderson, Ky. 

'91. — M. A. Carpenter with F. L. and J. C. 01m- 
stead. Park Road, Mt. Auburn. 

'91. — Fred L. Taylor is studying at the Boston 
Medical College, at the same time keeping his posi- 
tion at the Brookline Water Works. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



89 



'•93. — Edwin C. Howard, teacher, New Hartford, 
Gonn. 

'94. — Ralph E. Smith, our assistant Botany profes- 
sor, has reached Munich after a very prosperous 
voyage. 

'95.— E. A. White, florist at the Mass. Agr'l col- 
lege in '96 and '97, now dealing in cut-flowers and 
potted palms. 474 Massachusetts avenue, Arlington, 
Mass. 

'97. — At the recent alumni meeting in Boston, 
John M. Barry was elected one of the directors. 

Ex-'97. — Maurice E. Cook, Shrewsbury, Mass. 

Ex-'97.— J. R. Eddy is in Washington, D. C, lay- 
ing out one of the new parks. 

'97. — C. I. Goessmann with Miss Hewitt for a 
partner, took first prize in the cake walk given by the 
Home Culture circle of Northampton, on the evening 
of Jan. 26. 

'97. — G. F. Palmer, First Assistant in the Moody 
School, Fairfield, Me. 

'97. — The '97 resident alumni will hold a banquet 
during the coming week. 

'97. — P. H. Smith has been in town the last few 
days. 



THE PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL CHEM- 
ISTRY DURING THE LAST TWENTY-FIVE 
YEARS, AND ABSTRACTED BY C. 
A. NORTON AND C. A. PETERS, 
FROM PROF. MAX MAERCKER. 
Considering progress in the knowledge of plant 
food, we find the question which the agricultural 
chemist has to solve, is, what food stuff, in what 
form and admixture, is requisite for the highest plant 
production. Experiments in this field have been car- 
ried on for a long time, but our definite knowledge has 
been gained only during the past twenty-five years, by 
the water culture method of Sachs, Knop and Nobbe, 
and the sand culture of Helriegel. By these experi- 
ments carried out in absolutely pure media, has been 
established not only what food material is used, but 
the function of each element as well. 

Phosphoric acid is indispensable to the plant 
because the albuminoids which are the basis of assim- 
ilation are phosphoric combinations. Albuminoids 



are evidently intermediate phosphoric acid combina- 
tions which occur in protoplasm. 

The roles of iron and sulphur is also very clear as 
iron is a constituent of chlorophyl and sulphur of 
albumonoids. 

The function of calcium was long uncertain but re- 
cent discoveries have shown that it is necessary for 
the fixation of oxalic acid which occurs in the imm- 
ediate oxidation products of the carbohy- 
drates and which is poisonous to the plant. The res- 
ulting calcium oxalate is stored in the plant in crystals. 
It was formerly believed that calcium played an im- 
portant role in functions of the leaf, as the leaf is the 
chief source of calcium in the plant, but on the other 
hand the leaf is the chief source of oxalic acid and 
it is therefore perfectly natural that the greatest amount 
of calcium should be found there. 

The role of potash was also cleared up for the first 
time by Helriegel. It was known earlier that all car- 
bohydrate containing plants, needed an abundance of 
potash for their development, but the proof that potash 
stood in a definite relation to carbohydrate product- 
ion was first brought about by Helriegel four years 
ago, and proved by him that at a given point near the 
production of dry matter the production of sugar sinks, 
if sufficient potash is not supplied. This is not alone 
the single function of potash, for protoplasmic activity 
without the aid of potash is inconceivable. 

Magnesium seems to have a definite function in 
the formation of the nitrogen combinations of chloro- 
phyl, for there is found in chlorophyl large amounts of 
magnesium phosphate, but it also seems to have 
another function in the plant, the nature of which is not 
yet quite clear. 

Nitrogen is a constituent of chlorophyl and essential 
to the formation of protoplasm and therefore very 
necessary. 

The function of chlorine is also uncertain unless 
one contends that is necessary for the formation and 
transportation of starch but recent investigations have 
made this function somewhat doubtful. 

Sodium and Silicic acid appear to be essential, but 
no definate function is known for them as yet. P. 
Wagner has shown that Sodium can replace potassium 
to a certain extent, so that a plant may reach its high- 
est development with the least amount of potash if a 
considerable quantity of soda is present. 



go 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The plant needs mineral food for a two fold purpose, 
first, as has just been shown certain mineral substances 
appear in definite materials in the plant. Second, the 
plant has a general need of mineral matter, which need 
we may call " Mineral Hunger." This " Mineral 
Hunger " does not need to be supplied by any definite 
material, such as Potash, but is satisfied by any 
material, such as soda or silicic acid, which is much 
cheaper. Emil Wolff found that upon using the 1.95 
parts mineral matter necessary for the production of 
100 parts dry matter in the oat, he only obtained 65 
parts dry matter, but adding 1 .05 parts soda and silicic 
acid the 100 parts of dry matter was produced. These 
1.05 parts of mineral matter had no definite function in 
the plant but simply served to satisfy its " Mineral 
Hunger." Thus there is an advantage in applying 
crude fertilizers like potash salts, as besides the potash, 
the crude salts contain just the requirements to satisfy 
this hunger. 

The author now deals at length with the soil and 
says chemical analysis reveals little. and the crop is as 
dependent upon the mechanical condition, and the 
supply of water as, it is upon fertilizers. He also 
speaks of Thomas Slag Phosphate, making the state- 
ment that 14 million hundred weight of this is used 
annually and that the demand for this material has 
revolutionized the iron industry, as formerly ores poor 
in phosphoric acid were sought, now ores rich in 
phosphoric acid are used. 

Citing the Sugar Beet as an example of progress 
in agricultural chemistry. Prof. Maercker says, that 
formerly the white beet grown in the best of soil 
could only compete with cane sugar where sugar was 
at its highest market price. The lowering of the price 
of sugar made it necessary to raise the percentage of 
of sugar in the root and cause the beet to be raised upon 
all soils. By aid of well directed culture experi- 
ments, this has been done. Selecting seeds from the 
beets richest in sugar as well as those of the best size 
of leaf, and those with the richest and purest juice 
to-day beet sugar easily competes with cane sugar. 

Formerly the sugar content of the beet scarcely 
exceeded 10 per cent, to day 15-20 per cent is no 
rarity; and in the same way the yield per acre has 
been raised from 30 or 35 hundred weight, to 50 and 
even 70 hundred weight consequently sugar costs to-day 
only 2.4 cents per pound duty free. 



Upon the great advance in the conservation of 
of nitrogen little can here be said of the important 
invest igationsof Helriegl and others. 

These are but few of the points and very briefly 
touched in the development of agricultural chemistry 
during the last twenty-five years. 

LIBRARY NOTES. 

Quite a number of books have been added to the 
library since our last vacation. A few of the most 
interesting and instructive are here mentioned. 

Malay Sketches, by Frank A. Swettenham. A book 
of 289 pages which thoroughly describes Malay scen- 
ery and Malay character, by one v/ho has spent the 
best part of his life in the scenes and among the 
people described! The attempt of this book is only 
to awaken an interest in an almost undescribed but 
deeply interesting people : the dwellers in one of the 
most beautiful and least known countries in the East. 

Ars Reete Vivendi, being essays contributed to " The 
Easy Chair " by George V/illiam Curtis. I believe 
the whole list of contents if published would be of no 
disadvantage to any of us. Extravagance at College, 
Brains and Brawn, Hazing, The Soul of the Gentle- 
man, Theatre Manners, Woman's Dress, Secret 
Societies, Tobacco and Manners , Duelling, News- 
paper Ethics. Rather than giving the substance of 
these short chapters, I am sure more can be gained 
by reading them in the original, but just for an illus- 
tration let us look in the third chapter. " The 
meanest and most cowardly fellows in college rhay 
shine most in hazing. The generous and manly men 
despise \i. The hazers in college are the men who 
have been bred upon dime novels and the prize ring- — 
in spirit, at least, if not in fact — to whom the training 
and instincts of the gentleman are unknown." Such 
are some of the forcible truths of this little book which 
if once started in circulation will surely promote a 
higher and better life for college we/7. 

The Shadow Christ, an introduction to Christ him- 
self by Gerald Stanley Lee, author of " About an Old 
New England Church." While it is almost an impos- 
sibility to review such a work as this in a few lines, 
we can gather from the title that it is a book worth 
reading. Its substance is of a high spiritual nature, 
while the incidents which are here related are merely 
reflections upon the Bible whose great meaning is 
translated into our own modern language. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



91 



A Text Book of i he History of Architecture, by A. 
D. F. Hamlin, A. M. The aim of this book is to 
sketch various periods and styles of architecture with 
the broadest possible strokes and to mention the most 
important work of each of these two divisions. The 
book is finely illustrated and will serve as a great 
help to one who is interested in this subject. 

A History of Sculpture, by Allan Marquand and 
Arthur L. Frothingham who are professors of Archae- 
ology and the History of Art in Princeton University. 
The object of this volume is to provide students in 
schools and colleges with a concise survey of the 
history of sculpture so that they may be able to com- 
prehend intelligently the sculpture of the past and the 
present in the countries with which our own civiliza- 
tion has been and is most intimately connected. The 
book is divided into twenty-seven chapters and very 
elaborately illustrates the modern sculpture in France, 
in England and America. 

Agricultural Chemistry, in two volumes by R. H. 
Andre and T. B. Wood, treats of several experi- 
! ments concerning the Air, Water, Carbon, etc. 
The books were written last year and are the results 
of careful investigation in agricultural experiments 
and will, be of great aid to one who is working along 
this line. 

We have also received the following books : 
Elements of Perspective, Aaron Penley. 
Artistic Anatomy of the Dog and Deer, by Hawkins and 

Waterhouse. 
Anatomy of the horse, by Hav/kins and Waterhouse. 
Comparative Anatomy as Applied to the Purpose of the 

Artist, by Hawkins and Waterhouse. 
Trees and how to draw them, by Phillip Delamotte. 
Study of Breeds, by Thomas Shaw. 
Manual of Physical Drill of U. S. A., by E. L. Butts. 
San Jose Scale, by T. D. A. Cockerell. 



E^C^^^si^es- 



A New Yorker has patented an advertising scheme, 
which consists of a pair of shoes made on the princi- 
ple of the rubber stamp, with an ink pad in the heel. 
Wherever he walks he leaves a perfectly printed" ad " 
on the sidewalk. The only drawback we see in this 
scheme is, that to succeed a man must first " put his 
foot " in it. — Ex. 



" Tarara-boom-de-aye," still lives. Here it 
again, from a Georgia paper : 

I had a girl in Mexico, 
Insect bit her on the toe, 
Now she's where the lillies grov/. 
Name of insect you may know — 
Tara ra-ra-ra-rantula, etc. — Ex. 







''Ntl! .GOM5WUCTI0N 



i5ATI5mCTI0M. 



wm/f6^ 



XjjOmo:. 



92 



AGGIE LIFE. 



CLASSIC OCCUPATIONS. 
To sit upon a cycle, cold In Knickerbockers short, 

An abbreviated coat and knitted hose. 
In summer, spring or fall-time, may be considered sport, 

But excuse me in the winter, — I'm too froze. 
1 am a devotee, 'tis true, but no enthusiast. 

There's no fun when breezes thro' my wiskers blows. 
So I much prefer to sit in doors while this cold weather lasts. 

Sawing wood, and playing checkers with Tny hose. 



nmm, 

Annast, Aa$$. 



Attention Agentsi 

The CHRISTIAS^ ERA. FERI'ICTUAL CALENDAR 

lasts for ever. By it you can find any date— past, pi'esent or 
future— and the day of tlie week of siny event back to A. D. 1, 
or forward to the end of time. With beautiful photo eugrav- 
ing, symbolical of the VHRISTI AN ERA. Sells at sight. 
Every home must have it. All ofE.-es, banks, doctors, minis- 
ters, lawyers, schools, and all other business houses must 
have it. Exclusive territory. Send 25c. in One cent stamps for 
samples and terms. 

CHAS. C. HASKELL & SON, 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tiong strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific JImericait. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 9 
year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co.36'B'«»»''-y. New York 

Branch Office. 625 F St.. Washington, D. C. 








AGGIE LIF^t. 



SPECIAL DRIVE. 




96 KEATING BICYCLES 



SEiH! rriEi^^a? otrxs^vE. 



mm. 







PHOTOGRAPHIG STUDIO. 

Societj^ Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



10s Main Street, Nokthampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



HEADQUA RTERS FOR AG6!E STUDENTS. 

HAIR DREBSIMa BOOMS. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBERS' SUPPI-IES FOR SALE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

TiieLeaiiliPliotosiapler 

I— «l_^=t-:^fc_^— J 
OF WESTERK MASSACHUSETTS. 
Work Guaranteed or money refunded. Give us a trial. 

102 Main St., opp. Court House, 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

KEAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Oflace, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



AGENT. 



Lovelly 



The Photographer y 

To tlie class of '97 M. A. C. MAKES A SPECIALTY 
OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

H.uid Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 
AMHERST, MASS. 



, K. BENNETT, 



Jeweler, 
Optician, 
Watchmakei . 



tlKST DOCK FKOM POST OFFICE. 

FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICEb. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED 



AGGIE LIF^. 



C. S. GA^iES, D. D. S. 

|], N. BROWN, I). D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 

STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 







(Dassaehqsetts flgnieultupal College. 



AT THE 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



Perciigfoii Hflfses aiiii Soilii 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



Rear of Purity Bakery, 
AMHERST, MASS. 
of work i^uaranteed 






(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATiG, PLUMBING kM GAS 

HUNT'S BLOCK, 



^ORKS. 

AMHERST. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



RivEK Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



Over 4,000 vacancies. Faithful service guaranteed. Book 
with free plans, 10 cents. Blanks free. Address, 

Southern Teachers' Bureau, Louiscille Ky. 



R. F. Kelton. 



D. B. Kelto». 



'•9 



DEALERS IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats, 



P80LTBY, VEUETaeiES, FlSfl m OYSTE?S. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



AdrGiE JLIFk 



E. B. mCKINeDH, B. B. B. 

E 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AJNIHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

9 TO 12 jf^. Ivl-, 1-30 TO S ^'. IvI. 



Ethex* and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



Liverv and Feed Stable. 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE 

PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOE EVERYBODY. 



L. W. GIBBS & CO., 

James E. Stintson, Manager, 

CLOTHIERS and FURNISHERS. 

.ALL THE NP:W THINGS IN 

NECKWEAR, HATS AND CAPS, 

GOLF SUITS, &c. 



Cook's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



t^Rttpairing done uvhile yo-u wait,..S!^ 
2 JPHCENIX JtOW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY AND FEED STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

A.MITT aTItMET, AMHERST, MJiSS. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and niglit callj responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

*Go-Operati¥e Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Rsnovatiiii Estaisiiment, 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Mondaj'^ delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Satui'day. 

Office : 
Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 




aiatebmakef and Optieian. 



Prompt skillful attention given to all fine 
and complicated watchwork. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cntei' especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 



AMHE RST H 0U8E 

FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICUUR. 

Manager. | 



D. H. KENDRICK, 




Do you know that a TYPEWRITER will 
you TIME, make you MONEY and please 
correspondents ? 



save 
your 



TOWER'S NEW FRANKLIN TYPEWRITER, PRICE $7500. 

Is a first class type writer at a reasonable price. It is the simplest, lightest, easiest running, fastest, and 
the most durable typewriter made. On the majority of other high grade- machines the carriage has to be 
lifted before the work can be seen. On the New Franklin the work is in sight from the time the first letter 
is written until the paper is removed from the typewriter. 

TYPEWRITERS OF ALL MAKES SOLD. EXCHANGED AND REPAIRED. TYPEWRITERS RENTED, $3 PER MONTH- 

For illustrated catalogue and full particulars write to 



OUTTEIR TOWER CO 



12 A. Milk Stnet,- 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Established 1845. Tel. 2423. 




i 



m 
m 



fe 



ARNS BICYCL 



Among the improvements for 1898 are full flush joints, internal seat post and handle 
bar post fastenings, self-oiling bearings, low frames and low crank hanger drop, nar- 
row tread, new style handle bars, the most perfect crank hanger mechanism in 

existence. 

Stearns Chainless $125.00 

Stearns Specials 75.00 

Stearns Yellow Fellows 50.00 

Stearns Tandems 125.00 

Write now for handsome illustrated catalogue, free on application. 



m E. C. STEARNS & CO., SYRAOUSE, N. V. 




VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST, MASS.. FEBRUARY 16, 1898 



NO. 8 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 

Tirms $1.00 per year In advance. SingI ; copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Randall D. Warden. '98, Editor-in-Chief. 
Alexander Montgomery, Jr., '98, Business Manager. j 
Frederick H. Turner, '99, Ass't Business Manager. 

George H. Wright, '98. Willis S. Fisher, '98. \ 

.\vedis G. Adjemian, '98. Warren E. Hinds, '99. 

William H. Armstrong, '99. Charles A. Crowell, Jr., '00. 

George F. Parmenter, '00. James E. Halligan, '00. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed to Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. j 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 

Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 
Y. M. C. A. 
Athletic Association, 
Foot-Ball Association, 
Base-Ball Association. 
College Boarding Club, 
Readmg-Room Association, . 
Ninety-Nine Index, 



of 1901 who were so untiring in their efforts in render- 
ing assistance to the decorating committee. With- 
out their aid none of the attractive designs which have 
received such favorable comment could have been 
executed. Other classes are not undeserving of 
praise, though to 1901 belongs the lion's share. 



W. S. Fisher, Pres. 

J. S. Eaton, Sec. 

R. D. Warden, Manager. 

G. H. Wright, Manager. 

J. P.Nickerson, Sec. 

J. S. Eaton, Manager. 

D. A. Beaman, Manager. 



i The manager of the base-ball team is arranging a 
very flattering schedule for the coming season and we 
; wish the team every success. Enthusiasm must be 
^ aroused among the players, and a general interest 
: must be manifested by the student body. There is 
■ some money yet due the foot ball association and the 
athletic committee has decided that, until this is 
payed, no money can be raised by the base ball asso- 
ciation. We wish this fact to be carefully noted and 
to urge that those who owe the association will rectify 
the matter at once as it will be disastrous, not only to 
future foot ball, but to all athletics as well. 



'i3kiSi 



In the February numiber of the College Athlete 
Magazine, there is a three column article on the M. 
A. C. foot ball team of last season, together with a 
half-tone engraving of the players. The reviewer 
speaks favorably of the past season and in high terms 
of J. C^ Tyler, a former Princeton player as a coach. 
The outlook, he says, for a successful season next 
year, is very bright. D. A. Beaman '99, is men- 
tioned as captain in glowing terms, and J. S. Eaton 
'98, and J. E. Halligan '00, are spoken of as the bright 
and shining stars. 



The Military Ball was a grand success and much 
credit is due to those who so willingly combined their 
efforts towards making a successful social affair. The 
committee desire to say a word in praise of the class 



We are glad that already ball practice has begun. 
An early start indicates college spirit and surely is 
commendable. The aspirants have such a novel way 
about them that we admire the accuracy and preci- 
sion with which they twist snowballs. Though prac- 
tice has been faithful we believe more systematized 
work would be desirable. We suggest that a trainer 
be secured, perhaps a senior might be persuaded to 
take charge, or, as the faculty always like to help, our 
president might come out for a half hour each day 
and offer himself as a target. Meanwhile the college 
could be induced to purchase several hundred glass 
windows and erect them around so that the beginners 
should have constant practice. Opportunity to throw 
at college members should at once be improved ; even 
if library and other books are dropped in the mud and 
water just remember that everyone is only to glad to 
dodge a snowball, it is such good exercise you know. 
We will not mention the injuries which a frozen snow-. 



94 



Aggie life. 



ball may inflict for we desire not to excite the public 
without due cause. When a stranger passes, by all 
means pelt him with snowballs and mud. Be sure 
and hit him hard, then he will not forget to recom- 
mend the college to outsiders who do not know us and 
must be informed of our good qualities. Such rumors 
have untold effect in attracting students. 



The '99 Index made its appearance on Jan. 29. 
The book is nicely bound in leatherette of maroon 
color with a neat design in gold, stamiped in the upper 
left hand corner of the cover. The board of editors 
have manifested the appreciation of the whole student 
body by dedicating their book to Dr. Chas. Welling- 
ton, who, by his untiring efforts for the success of his 
alma mater, has made himself worthy of all praise. 
The frontispiece of the book is a representation of 
Father Time ushering in the new year and the '99 
Index. But the old man must have had a greater 
load than he could carry, as he was unable to bring to 
us the book and the new year at the same time. The 
illustrations throughout are of artistic merit, and in- 
deed, a great deal of praise is due to the artist editor 
since the entire book has almost wholly been given 
over to drawings and designs. Among those of special 
merit may be mentioned: sunset at Aggie, junior 
promenade, and fraternities. One of the most attrac- 
tive pictures of the entire collection is entitled, " As 
you will always find him," representing President 
Goodell at work at his desk in his home. The liter- 
ary work has not been as extensive as in former years 
but among the writings of merit may be mentioned : 
" The '99 class history," a poem entitled, " To Miss 
B," and " Prof. Hipneau's experiment at the state 
university," a short story. Of great interest to the 
general reader is a compiliation of answers to ques- 
tions concerning the change of the college name by 
fifty of Aggie's graduates. These answers were tabu- 
lated by John A. Cutter, M. D. '82, and though not 
asserting to prove anything they go to show that there 
is a strong opinion among the alumni both for and 
against a change of name ; and it is equally notice- 
able that this opinion is divided between the two dis- 
tinct types of graduates, the agricultural and the pro- 
fessional men. Upon the whole this book is the 
most attractively illustrated Index that has ever been 
published. 



THE MILITARY BALL. 

The Military Ball, the grand social event of the 
year at the Massachusetts Agricultural College, took 
place in the Drill Hall, Friday evening, Feb. 11. 
Although the attendance of ladies, students, faculty 
and alumni was large the floor was not over-crowded. 
So many uniforms mingled with gay dresses gliding 
gracefully around this fine dance-hall was a most 
attractive sight. 

The decorations of the hall were both artistic and 
expensive, and presented quite a martial aspect 
Sabers and bayonets were arrayed in fitting designs 
upon the walls, while the two field pieces, with stacked 
arms and glistening bayonets in front, occupied a pos- 
ition at one end of the hall. From the centre of the 
ceiling, long red white and blue streamers of bunting 
gracefully radiated toward the sides, while interming- 
ling with these were the drooping folds of the stars and 
stripes. In the north end of the hall the two pieces 
of light artillery bristled out from behind a depth of 
hot-house plants and foliage. Between the two can- 
nons, and to the rear, was the orchestra, with a charm- 
ing little corner surrounded by spruce, for tete-a-tetes, 
on each side of the music. The other end of the hall, 
used by the patronesses to receive the guests, was 
fitted up with a tri-color background, easy chairs, 
Turkish rugs, delicately tinted parlor lamps and a per- 
fect little forest of tropical flowers. M. A. C. and 
class banners were tastefully hung about the walls. 
An interesting relic of athletic prowess is the banner 
won in 1871 from Harvard and Brown by a crew from 
this College. This trophy was hung just below the 
balcony. Hundreds of electric lights added much to 
the general effect. 

The patronesses were: Mrs. H. H. Goodell. Mrs. 
C. A. Goessmann, Mrs. Chas. Wellington, Mrs. G. F. 
Mills, Mrs. J. E. Ostrander. The committee on 
arrangements was as follows : From the faculty, Pro- 
fessors Mills and Wellington and Lieut. Wright ; from 
the societies, Q. T. V., J. P. Nickerson '98, Dan A. 
Beaman '99 ; D. G. K., J. Styles Eaton '98 (chair- 
man), Ysidro Canto '99 ; C. S. C,. Alexander Mont- 
gomery Jr. '98, Fred H. Turner '99 ; ^% K, Ran- 
dall D. Warden '98, E. Monroe Wright '99. 

Nothing but words of praise can be spoken for the 
committee, and to their efforts is due one of the most 



AGC^lE LIFE. 



95 



successful social affairs in the history of the College. 

In the early part of the evening several choice 
selections were rendered by the Banjo club. There 
were about ninety couples on the floor, while a num- 
ber of onlookers enjoyed the sight from the gallery. 
The grand march was led by Prof, and Mrs. Herman 
Babson, 

Refreshments were served at 11-30 o'clock and 
about two o'clock with the sweet strains of " Home 
Sweet Home " ringing through the hall, the dance 
broke up. The Springfield Orchestral club furnished 
excellent music during the evening. The caterer was 
Frank Wood. 

General regret was expressed at President H. H. 
Goodell's absence. The President was obliged to be 
absent on business. 

Among the young ladies present from Smith Col- 
lege were : Miss Esther F. Clapp, Miss M. Morse. 
Miss Ruth Brown, Miss L. Carter, Miss Ella B. Shep- 
ard. Miss Carrie A. Parsons, Miss Harriett M. Gold, 
Miss Myra Field, Miss Mabel Rice, Miss Emily M. 
Biglowe, Miss Lucy E. Day. Miss Mary B. Nelson, 
Miss Julia Peck, Miss Emilie Tomlinson, Miss Alice 
Maynard, Miss Fannie Eastman, Miss Nellie M. 
Clapp, Miss Caroline B. Read, Miss Frances E. 
Wheeler, Miss Sarah N. Whitman, Miss E. Blanch 
Wadleigh and Miss Annie Lentell; from Mount Hol- 
yoke College: Miss Jean D. Turner, Miss Bessie M. 
Hooker, Miss Louise M. Roraback, and Miss Emily 
W. Smith. Among those present from Amherst 
were : Miss Susan E. Hutchinson, Miss Mary W. 
Allen, Miss Bessie M. Sears, Miss Adella M. Davis, 
Miss Ethel Gilbert, Miss Agnes Goessmann, Miss 
Mary Goessmann and Miss Hattie Stebbins; from 
North Amherst: Miss Edith N. Cooley, Miss B. Isa- 
bel Roberts, Miss Myra Hobart, Miss May Rob- 
erts, Miss Alice Davidson; from Northampton: Miss 
Ella and Edith Hewitt; from Springfield: Miss Anna 
Johnson, Miss May Dorman, Miss Kate W. Smith and 
Miss Maud L. Ham ; from Leverett: Miss Anna Bea- 
man and Miss Georgia Field; from Chester : Miss 
Grace Pease ; Miss Stone of Boston ; Miss Woods of 
Worcester; Miss Mabel Billings of Hatfield; Miss 
Helen M. Stebbins and Miss M. Jean Greenough of 
Deerfield; Miss N. Ethel Dunham of Brattleboro, Vt.; 
Miss Rosina W. Smith and Miss Jennie L. Ring of 
Westfield. a. c. w. 



HOW THE PAY OF A REGIMENT REACHED 
NEW ORLEANS, 

LECTURE DELIVERED BEFORE THE N. H. S. BY PRES. 
H. H. GOODELL. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural college does not 
need to go outside of its own boundaries to find as fine 
a lecturer as one could wish to hear. Pres. Goodell has 
more than once proven himself an intersting enter- 
tainer and Monday evening was only another laurel- 
leaf added to the wreath he is twining about us. 
There was not a moment during the entire lecture 
that the audience did not listen with the most intense 
interest. The lecture itself was not only interesting 
from the martial point of view, but was replenished with 
amusing and thoroughly enjoyable incidents, in every 
case well told. 

Mr. Warden, president of the Natural History 
society, under whose auspices the lecture was held, 
introduced the speaker. Mr. Henry H. Goodell, 1st 
Lieut., 25th Conn. Vol. 

Mr. Goodell chose as his subject one which was 
adapted to interest everybody, namely, " How the 
Pay of a Regiment Reached New Orleans." 

As a few introductory remarks he touched on the 
bravery and courage of the boys in blue, and the 
respect we should have for them for the risks and 
hardships they suffered for our sakes. After spending 
a few minutes on his introduction he immediately 
went to his story. 

In the spring of 1863 his regi.ment was encamped 
about Vicksburg. One object of the army was to 
drive the rebels out of the fortifications about their 
salt mine south of Vicksburg, thus cutting of their salt 
supplies, and incidentally capturing their army. The 
assault on the batteries was successful, but the rebels 
eluded the Unionists sent to cut off their retreat. A 
pursuit immediately followed and it was during this 
pursuit that the incident of the regiment's pay occurred. 
The rebels had burned the bridges across the river 
and the Unionists were obliged to make camp to 
await some means of crossing the river. While en- 
camped here the paymaster arrived, and the men, 
having no use for the money just then, wished to send 
it home, but the only way of sending it was to have 
some one carry it to New Orleans and from there ship 
it north by express. It fell to the lot of Lieut. Goodell 



q6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



to perform this duty. The men turned their money 
over to him together with the address to which it was 
to be sent. This he placed in his haversack, which 
he has carefully preserved, and the same day took the 
boat for New Orleans. On the boat there was neither 
stateroom nor safe in which to place his treasure and 
he was obliged to carry it about with him all the time. 
It is needless to say that he did not get much sleep 
that night, for the thought that he carried such a 
large amount of cold cash with him naturally made 
him nervous and suspicious, and the continual stop- 
ping of the boat, thus lengthening the journey, did not 
take away from his fears. While describing the 
journey down the river Mr. Goodell gave a beautiful 
description of the scenery along the banks of the river. 
When the steamer was within thirty miles of Berwick 
Bay it broke down, necessitating a stop of eleven or 
twelve hours. By inquiry the lieutenant found that 
Berwick Bay was only about ten miles across the 
country and from there he could get a train for New 
Orleans. So he, accompanied by a disabled comrade, 
started to make the journey on foot. His companion 
soon gave out and turned back,but by perseverance, and 
the fact that he was in good physical condition, the lieu- 
tenant was able to reach Berwick Bay the next morn- 
ing just in time to catch the train. The journey to 
New Orleans was accomplished without mishap, and 
on arriving there he went immediately to the express 
office, where he obtained money order blanks. These 
he filled out at his room in the hotel and late at night 
retired to get a much needed rest. The next morning 
he passed the money over to the express agent and 
once more felt like a free man. One cannot but 
wonder that of all these orders, which amounted to 
about twenty-five thousand dollars, only one small 
order went astray and that was made good by the 
express company. Thus ended the incident of the 
pay-roll of the 25th Conn, regiment. 

It was only a short time after handing over the 
money to the express company that Lieut. Goodell 
again joined his regiment on the banks of the Red 
River, and he well deserved the hearty cheers with 
which his comrades greeted his safe return, 

D. '01. 



We all have ups and downs here, but when v/f 
in the cemetery we'll be on a dead level. — Ex. 



get 



SHADES OF THE EVENING. 

I am sitting, sadly sitting 

Near the fire-place, all aglow. 

And my mind is filled with mem'ries 
Of the faded, long ago. 

1 can see among those embers, 
'Midst those coals a'glowing there. 

The fair face of a sweet maiden 
Framed all in golden hair. 

'Tis a very pretty picture, 
That bright face so fair to see, 

But what bitter, sad reflections, 
As I gaze, return to me. 

1 remember how bewitching 
Was that maid in days of yore. 

As she strblled through the shady forest, 
Or stood on the lake shore. 

For I followed her most closely, 
Watched the fleeting moments fly. 

Finding every joy and sorrow 
In the glances of her eye. 

But those days are gone forever, 

Those happy days are fled, 
I've had ne'er a joyful moment 

Since I knew her love was dead. 

So that's why I'm sadly sitting 
In the ruddy-fire light's glow, 

And that's why I'm filled with mem'ries 
Of the faded long ago. 



stones. 



SOME NEW ARABIAN NIGHTS. 

THE STORY OF JOHN BRENDT. 

John Brendt was a successful journalist. He had 
begun his career on the lowest round of the journal- 
istic ladder and by steady work had climbed from 
being a mere reporter into the enviable position of the 
foremost dramatic critic of the day. His writings 
commanded high praise on every hand and his ex- 
haustive criticisms of the daily dramas that were 
"put on " in his town were the admiration of his fel- 
low-workers. His opinion was not to be bought under 
any circumstances and he treated friend and foe with 
equal candor. 

The dramatic season through which the critic had 
just passed, had been one of unexampled vigor and 



AGGIE LIF: 



97 



equal prosperity. New stars had appeared upon the 
theatrical firmament and old ones had died. The 
kaleidoscope of stage-life had exhibited the usual 
turns of color and action with one exception, and that 
unhappily connected itself with the name of John 
Brendt. 

Early in the season, a young girl attempted to go 
on the road with a play of her own. At first she had 
been successful, but as the company came east, dire 
disaster struck the box office and the receipts fell far 
below the expenses. Bookings for the eastern circuit 
had been made and could not be cancelled : a pros- 
perous run in New York was all that could save the 
piece. Extra exertion had been made in advance, to 
win the good-will of the critics and one and all, with 
the exception of Brendt, had promised his support. 
John Brendt neither acquiesced nor condemned the 
actions of his brothers, and as it was vastly important 
to the new company that this critic, of all others, 
should be pacified, extra pressure was brought to bear 
upon him. 

The afternoon preceding the opening night, John 
Brendt found a letter upon his desk asking him to join 
a friend for an early supper before the show. Nothing 
loath, the critic appeared at the time appointed and 
was surprised to find the leading members of the dra- 
matic company already seated at the table with his 
friend as host. 

The effect of thus forcing upon him the presence of 
the star, was far from pleasing to the critic, but, being 
a polished gentleman, he could not manifest his dis- 
gust in any manner likely to offend. He sat through- 
out the meal, indifferently happy with the excellent 
wines set before him. 

If his surroundings were unpleasant he could at 
least study the character of the lady who hoped to 
carry the applause of New York. What struck John 
Brendt most forcibly, was the young lady's lack of 
affectation, a trait of character not common among 
actresses. She was quiet and unassuming, and 
looked at him from great dark eyes that seemed to 
appeal to his sympathetic nature. Her head was 
finely poised upon what must be, so he imagined, 
faultless shoulders ; her hand, and John Brendt was a 
connoisseur of hands, was well groomed and of excel- 
lent shape ; her voice had none of that strident quality 
that is associated with an actress off the stage, but 



was rather of a finely modulated tone and of excellent 
timbre. The whole appearance of the little lady im- 
pressed the critic and he quietly vowed that he would 
give her as good and full a notice as his conscience 
would allow him ; he only hoped that she could act. 

The days following that eventful night are ones of 
much obscurity to Brendt ; how it all happened he 
cannot remember, but he certainly was disgusted with 
the piece and yet when his paper appeared on the fol- 
lowing morning he found that he had published a glow- 
ing criticism of the excellent acting of Julia Gray. 
He could not understand it, and he offered no expla- 
nations when friends accused him of any partiality. 

The company remained in New York four weeks, 
and then left for the eastern coast. New York had 
forgotten the episode, but not so John Brendt. Upon 
the critic's dressing case there stood a picture of 
Julia Gray in the character he had immortalized in the 
columns of his paper ; within the innermost recess of 
his private desk, there lay concealed a letter which he 
would take out and read in the last hours of the night. 
Every word was indelibly stamped upon his mind ; 
each letter, so characteristic of that femenine hand he 
had admired, was fresh in his memory. 

On this night in question, he was sitting before his 
cosy fire and the letter lay open upon his knee. The 
words were blurred and indistinct but he could still 
read them, and it seemed as if Julia Gray herself was 
beside him, and was speaking to him in that low pas- 
sionate voice. The note was but a short one and ran 
in this wise : 

My dear Mr. Brendt : — You cannot imagine what 
real pleasure your criticism has given me. I desire to 
thank you for the kind words that you wrote and only 
wish that I felt my poor self really v/orthy of them. 
If you but knew how hard I have striven, and hov/ 
high I have placed my ambitions you would surely 
sympathize with me. I know you would for you have 
a large and true heart. 

If I were to tell you that a poor mother and crippled 
sister are dependent upon me for support, and that 
your words have been an inspiration to me, I know 
that you would never withdraw them. I have told 
you that about my life which no other man knows, for 
I feel that I can trust you. 

If ever you need a friend, Come to 

Julia Gray. 



98 



aCjijilL L,lk>'kL. 



It was a short note, and much like others Brandt 
had received before under Hke circumstances. There 
was much womanly feeling in it, but that hardly ap- 
pealed to the critic then. He had hardly recovered 
from the blov/ he had dealt himself, when he read his 
own criticism that morning. It was perhaps on ac- 
count of this that the note lay neglected for some 
weeks and was finally found among some unpaid bills. 

Since the delicate note had been ensconced in its 
new shrine, John Brendt had lived a different life. He 
ceased to be so much of a pessimist and adopted a 
manner of living quite optimistic. His reviews be- 
came less caustic and his friends said that he must be 
in love. The critic only laughed their words to scorn, 
but as he was unaccustomed to laughter, that act in 
itself rather confirmed his friends in their opinion. 

As he sat before the fire, his pipe neglected and 
his vest covered with ashes, there were traces of tears 
about his eyes. On his left knee rested the letter ; 
on his right, there was spread an evening paper. An 
item of but a few lines in length met his gaze, and he 
read : 

" Married : — Gray — Grisscom. At Trinity Parish : 
Julia Gray, actress, and Lloyd Griscom, lawyer, by 
Rev. John Shepard." 

For a few moments the room was still, then John 
Brendt arose, threw the letter into the blazing fire and 
kicked the firedogs over ; then he yawned and went 
out. 



When the landlord had finished his tale, we, each 
and everyone, simultaneously knocked the ashes from 
our pipes, took our candles and trooped off to bed. 

F. A. M. 



NANETTE. 

A RAILROAD STORY. 

John Arnold had been walking up and down the 
aisle of the smoking car for the last twenty minutes, 
nervously chewing the end of his cigar. His coat 
collar was turned up about his ears and his hands were 
thrust deeply into his pockets. Every now and then he 
would stop and ejaculate in language more forcible 
than elegant as he realized that the train on which he 
was traveling, was likely to be stalled for another hour 
at least. 

Although a comparatively young man, John Arnold 



had worked himself into the position of general super- 
intendent of the road on which he was now running ; 
and this honorable position he had reached by per- 
sistent effort and untiring zeal. So it was especially 
galling to the young official to find himself delayed 
upon the system that had become his pride in its 
clock-like regularity and which owed much of its suc- 
cess to his own efforts. 

The accident was far from serious ; a broken car- 
wheel being the trouble, but it required time to repair 
it so that the train might move on. Then, to add to 
the general discomfiture, the break had occurred in 
the loneliest part of the road. Thoroughly disgusted 
with his misfortune, and impatiently desiring to expe- 
dite matters as much as possible, John Arnold stepped 
off the car and walked forward along the track. 

As he went along slowly, he was accosted by a 
young girl, hardly more than twenty years of age, who 
hesitatingly asked him about the accident and the 
likelihood of their being longer delayed. A touch of 
impatience sounded in her tremulous voice that 
attracted Arnold's attention and he noticed that she 
had been crying. She was so young and pretty, with 
such a wealth of golden hair, that the red eye-lids 
seemed incongruous with the rest of her appearance 
and John Arnold's heart was touched. 

After some questioning, he learned that her name 
was Nanette Greigerson ; that she was returning from 
an academy to her home at Hollow Bend, having 
been called there by a telegram that had told of her 
mother's serious illness and had bidden her make all 
haste in her return to her parent's side. It was un- 
certain when Mrs. Greigerson would die, but her death 
was expected hourly, and then Nanette would be an 
orphan. Hollow Bend was but a few miles off, and 
the tears came to Nanette's eyes as she thought of 
her heroic struggle to reach the death-bed, of her 
success in starting, and then of her failure when the 
journey was all but ended. 

John Arnold listened attentively to the pathetic 
little tale, then he turned and beckoned Nanette to 
follow him. Quickly they walked together by the 
long Pullman cars until they reached the eager knot 
gathered about the broken wheel. Arnold pushed his 
way through until he was beside the engineer who was 
bending over his work. 

" Murphy," he said, and his voice was that of one 



AGGIE LIFE. 



99 



used to command, " Is there any one beside you who 
can fix that wheel ?" 

Murphy looked up and saw that it was his superior 
officer. " No sir," he replied. 

" How long will it take you ?" Arnold asked. 

"Another hour, sir," said Murphy. 

" How long a run is it to Hollow Bend?" 

" About twenty minutes," the engineer said, 

" Break off the engine, Willis," Arnold said, turn- 
ing to a train hand. '• Murphy, I'm going to run 
down to Hollow Bend. I'll be back in forty-five 
minutes. Be ready to start as soon as I return." 

" Very good, sir," said the engineer, without look- 
ing up from his work. 

Nanette never clearly realized how they started or 
how she came to be sitting in the cab of a flying loco- 
motive, but the cool rushing air brought her mind 
back to the realities of the day, and she knew that 
this strange man, whom she had met so casually, 
seemed capable of ordering all things to his will and 
commanding all men. 

They were flying past telegraph poles and detached 
clumps of trees, with now and then a lonely farm- 
house to break the monotony. The engine seemed to 
swallow the rails with greedy appetite and to sway 
from side to side, as if it found trouble in digesting 
the steel bands that stretched so far ahead. At fre- 
quent intervals the shrill shriek of the whistle would 
startle the echoes, and the wind would feebly respond. 
Across bridges, through cuts, around curves they 
rushed ; little stations flew past them, and a cloud of 
dust stretched far behind. Across the cab, with his 
left hand firmly grasping the steam throttle, Nanette 
could see John Arnold as his keen eye searched the 
track ahead, and she knew that they were having a 
race with Death, and she felt that they would win. 

Forest avenue had just been passed, when the 
engine gave a tremble and then slowed down with a 
grinding noise, and Hollow Bend came into viev/. 
Quickly they drew up to the station, where the aston- 
ished agent stood and watched them. 

Arnold, breathlessly, called out to him, " Is Mrs. 
Greigerson dead yet ?" 

" No, she's improving, I'm told," was the answer. 
" Thank God for that 1" cried John Arnold and 
Nanette wondered at the quavering of his voice. 

X. 



^olle;^^ ^otfs- 



— Thirty three sinners late for chapel. 

— The electric cars were disabled last Saturday by 
the rain. 

—Casey '01 is slowly recovering from periostesis of 
the bone of the ankle. 

—Monday, Jan. 31st and Tuesday, Feb. 1st, the 
drill hall was so cold that we had no drill. 

— S. E. Smith '99 sprained his wrist rather severely 
a few days ago trying to laugh at a '9 9. Index joke but 
not so severely as to prevent him attending recita- 
tions. 

— Sunday, Jan. 30, 20"^ below zero and Tuesday, 
Feb. 1, snow three feet deep. Who says the old 
fashioned New England winters are a thing of the 
past ? 

— Next Friday evening Prof. Emerson of Amherst 
college will deliver a lecture to the Natural History 
Society on his trip with Nansen on the Fram among 
the Fiords. 

— The senior class in prescribed English are 
excused from a few recitations to give extra time to 
their work of prepairing briefs from which forensics 
will be written. 

— On Sunday, Feb. 13th, Prof. Clark of Amherst 
college spoke to the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. On March 1 1th, Prof. Clark will lecture to the 
Natural History Society. 

— W. E. Chapin '99 was obliged to spend a week 
at his home on account of weak eyes, and while there 
he consulted an oculist. He has now returned much 
improved as to his eyesight. 

— The Glee Club has elected the following officers : 
leader, W. S. Fisher '98; manager, J. S. Eaton '98. 
The '99 Index was a little previous in naming W. H. 
Armstrong '99 as business manager. 

— The Military Ball committee desire to express 
their gratitude to the Faculty and their wives who so 
kindly entertained the young ladies and made possible 
the great success of the Military Ball. 

— Monday evening, Jan. 31st, the much belated '99 
Index appeared. This is not the place for a criticism 
but everybody will observe that it is a well gotten up 
picture book, and in this is its chief merit. 



»00 



AGGIE LIFE. 



—Monday evening, Feb. 7th, Pres. Goodell gave a 
very interesting lecture to the Natural History Society 
on " How the pay of a regiment was carried to New 
Orleans." All enjoyed it very much and we were 
glad of the opportunity of hearing our own Presi- 
dent lecture. For a full account of the lecture see 
another column. 

— The president of the Natural History Society has 
arranged an excellent schedule of lectures as follows : 

Feb. 7, Pres. H. H. Goodell, " How the pay of a 
regiment reached New Orleans." 

Feb. 13, Prof Emerson. 

Feb. 25, Dr. Chas. Wellington. 

Mar. 4, Chas. L. Flint, " Yosemite Valley." This 
lecture will be illustrated by stereopticon views. 

Mar. 1 1 , Prof. Clark of Amherst college," Jamaica." 

— The severe storm of Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 was the 
cause of considerable inconvenience. All traffic 
was suspended on the electric road. Trains on all 
roads were behind schedule time. Members of the 
State Grange who were on their way to Amherst to 
visit our college were stalled in Northampton and only 
three deputies succeeded in reaching their destination. 
It is a peculiar fact that when the grangers came here 
last year the severest storm of the winter was in 
progress. 

— The laboratory of the chemical department 
(fertilizers) of the Hatch experiment station is under- 
going extensive repairs. Partitions have been taken 
down and rooms enlarged. New hoods have been 
put in and the rooms are being repainted 
throughout. The laboratory is also being restocked 
with the most improved apparatus, the most interesting 
of which will be a new apparatus for the determin- 
ation of nitrogen according to the Kjeldhal method. 
This apparatus is being constructed after the most 
recent German pattern and will be made entirely of 
glass ; those formerly in use being made of block tin 
and copper. The working facilities of the fertilizer 
department will be greatly increased. 

— The Military Ball committee can thank H. Baker, 
1900 for the cannon being in the hall the night of the 
dance. The first gang that tried to bring them in 
gave it up as a bad job and felt satisfied after they got 
the piece remounted and back into the gun shed. Mr. 
Baker's method was very simple and practical. He 



slung a pulley over a beam in the gun shed, 
caught the cannon in a sling and hoisted it off the 
the carriage. Then he rolled the carriage out of the 
way and lowered the cannon onto a small truck and 
rolled it into the drill hall through the narrow passage 
way. Then he fastened his pulley over a beam in the 
drill hall and raised the cannon again. By taking the 
wheels off the carriage, that was brought into the hall 
the same way the cannon was. Then the wheels were 
replaced, the cannon lowered onto the carriage and 
the whole thing done quicker than it takes to tell it. 

Alumni. 

74.— John M. Benedict, M. D., 81 North Main 
St., Waterbury, Conn. 

'83. — Charles H. Preston, Asylum Station, Mass. 

'89. — R. E. Sellew, travelling agent for the Cleve- 
land Linseed Oil Co., was in town last week. 

'90. — John S. West, business manager of Insur- 
ance Printing House and pastor's assistant of the 
Immanuel Baptist church, Chicago, 111. Address, 2448 
Cottage Grove. 

'91.— F. L. Arnold, 351 Livington St., Elizabeth, 
N.J. 

'92. — R. H. Smith writes from Goettingen in Ger- 
many that he has entered upon his studies for a doc- 
tor's degree, that he is much pleased with his work 
and is making considerable progress. 

'92. — Richard P. Lyman is to be married to Miss 
Annie Downing Evans, at Hartford, Conn., Feb. 16. 

'93. — Chas. A. Goodrich, 55 Wethersfield Ave., 
Hartford, Conn. 

'94. — Wm. E. Sanderson, with Peter Henderson & 
Co., Seedsmen, 35 & 37 Courtland St., N. Y. 

'94. — Extract of a letter from Prof. Ralph E. 
Smith : " Here in Munich I have gotten along very 
well and am domicilled with the same ' Hausfrau ' 
with whom Dr. Paige and family lived. They all think 
Dr. Paige was ' hot stuff,' around here. Apparently 
none knew him but to love him, for certainly none 
name him but to praise. I am in Prof. Hartig's 
laboratory in the forestry institute under the special 
guidance of Juheuf, who is Hartig's assistant. Am 
putting all my time into pathology. They have lots 
of nice material but not nearly as good a laboratory 



AGGIE LIFE. 



lOI 



as ours in Amherst. I have affiHated very well with 
Hartig and Tuheuf and have gotten well to work. 
They are both genial and affable men. I hear but 
little English nowadays and consequently am learning 
a good deal of German by the ' natural method.' " 
His address is 71 Tiirken St. II, Munich. Germany. 
'94. — A. H. Kirkland. assistant state entomologist, 
was in town last week in the interests of the gypsy 
moth commission. 

'94. — Chas. L. Brown is in partnership with J. H. 
Albee, steam laundry, Lyman St., Springfield, Mass. 

'95. — C. B. Lane of the New Brunswick, N. J., 
Experiment Station has been lecturing to farmers' 
institutes in New Jersey during the fall and winter. 

'95. — A. B.Smith, 544 Winnewac Ave., Ravens- 
wood, 111. 

'95. — Fred C. Tobey, instructor in mathematics 
and science and commandant of cadets, West Jersey 
academy, Bridgeton, N. J. 

'96. — Jas. F. Hammar, farmer, P. O. Box 710, 
Nashua, N. H. 

'96. — M. E. Sellew is studying medicine in Boston. 

'97.— H. F. Allen, Northboro, Mass. 

'97. — J. W. Allen, Northboro, Mass. 

'97. — J. M. Barry has signed a contract with a 
leading Southern railroad to take complete charge of 
the landscape gardening and construction for the road 
throughout the entire state of Florida. Mr. Barry 
has already reached the South and writes that he has 
nine hundred men under his charge. 

'97. — James L. Bartlett has been offered a fine 
position in the weather bureau at Boston. 

'97. — C, I. Goessmann and G. D. Leavens have 
recently been elected associate members of the 
American Chemical society. 



ACCORD. 
A child low bending over a lyre, 
Laying her ear to the soft touched strings. 
" Hush " — to her finger's quick desire — 
It's dreaming of happiness when it sings." 
A song faint jarred by a note's discord, 
A melody spoiled by a tone false lowered 
And then with a harmony all her own, 
The dream-child, almost to woman grown. 
Tenderly putting the strings in tune 
To sing, sometime, someday, soon ? — Ex. 



3$periirvf Bi' 



aon 



MECHANICAL STRUCTURE OF SOILS. 

Up to within a very few years two chief subjects. 
Chemistry and Drainage, have occupied the minds of 
those who have made a study of the relations of soils 
to plant growth ; but as science and practice have pro- 
gressed other branches have presented themselves 
and among these perhaps none is more important than 
the " mechanical structure of soils." For several 
years Prof. Whitney of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture was almost a lone champion of the sub- 
ject of soil physics ; but work along this line is now 
being taken up by several of the experiment stations 
in various sections of the country and this work is 
receiving favor in the minds of many of the best ex- 
perimenters of the time. So close a relationship has 
been found by Prof. Whitney to exist between the 
plant and the mechanical condition of the soil upon 
which it gro'^s, that he has been able to distinguish 
by simple mechanical characteristics, typical soils for 
nearly every crop. Thus for example we have Con- 
necticut river soil which is typical for a certain grade 
of tobacco. While in North Carolina we find a quite 
different soil, mechanically speaking, and there we 
find growing a type of tobacco wholly different from 
what the growers of the Connecticut valley can 
produce. 

Again with lettuce, it has been known for years that 
in no other part of Massachusetts could this crop be 
grown to such perfection as produced in the vicinity of 
Boston. Every form of manuring has been practiced 
by growers living in other sections of the state and 
yet the perfection reached by the Arlington growers 
could not be attained. In like manner with nearly 
every crop there has been found some section of the 
country in which it has done better than anywhere 
else, and the mechanical investigations, made by 
Prof. Whitney show that a typical soil for any given 
crop possesses certain definite mechanical character- 
istics common to those soils upon which the crop in 
question reaches its greatest perfection. It must not 
be understood however that these characteristics have 
to do only with the mechanical composition of the 
soil particle, for this is not the case. But such points 
as arrangement of the individual particles, the 
dynamics of water movement and retention in soil 



I02 



AGGIE LIFE. 



which include the capacity of soil for water, the ad- 
justment of water between a dry and wet soil, the rela- 
tion of texture, structure and temperature to the 
water capacity and many other such points have to be 
taken into consideration when physically studying the 
characteristics of a given soil. 

The lack of space forbids my entering deeper into 
the details of soil physics. But a recounting of the 
experiments being carried out this season at the 
Hatch Experiment Station of this College Depart- 
ment of Vegetable pathology and physiology, will give 
in general the methods pursued by some of the exper- 
menters along this line. These experiments are upon 
lettuce and are conducted for the purpose of obtaining 
practical methods for preparing soils : so that this 
crop may be brought to as great a perfection in other 
sections of the state as it is in Arlington and vicinity. 
The experiments are as follows ; typical soils have 
been secured from various lettuce sections of the State 
and placed in beds in the green houses of the Station, 
under as nearly similar external environments as 
possible. In these respective soils have been planted 
lettuce and the growth of the various plots compared 
with the Arlington plot which is taken as the normal 
lettuce soil. Mechanical analysis has been made of 
the Arlington and other soils employed and the latter 
analysis compared with that of the former or Arlington 
sample, and the differences in mechanical composi- 
tion noted. This gives rise to a second series of 
experiments. In these the same method of plots are 
employed as in the experiment given above ; but in 
this latter case certain materials have been added to 
each respective soil in order to bring its mechani- 
cal condition as nearly as possible like the normal 
or Arlington lettuce soil. 

These experiments have not been running for any 
considerable length of time and so no definite con- 
clusions can be drawn, but so far as they have gone 
they seem to point toward some interesting and valu- 
able results both from a practical and scientific stand 
point. 



College men are very slow, 
They seem to take their eaj;e. 
For even v/hen they graduate 
They do it by degrees. — Ex. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

The College Cavaliers by S. B. Pettengill published 
in 1883 and donated to the library by Henry E. 
Alvord. The book is very unique in its compositionn, 
describing principally how a large number of Dart- 
mouth students entered the Northern Army in response 
to the urgent and almost frantic call for troops to 
defend the city of Washington at the time when Gen. 
Banks was driven down the Shenandoah Valley into 
Maryland by Stonewall Jackson. A chapter is care- 
fully devoted to the cavaliers in camp at Washington 
and Fairfax seminary. Several battle incidents are 
very interestingly related and in the last chapter we 
are told how all returned at the close of the war save 
one. The book is very interesting, especially so since 
its incidents are all true, and its author Mr. Pettengill 
is also one of the College cavaliers. 

Partisan Politics, the Evil and the Remedy, by J. S. 
Brown, a book of two hundred and twenty pages 
divided into twenty-three chapters. Several interesting 
subjects are herein treated as. Sectarian Politics, 
Their Tendency to degrade the Civil Service, Political 
Heresy, Disparagement of Public Men, Have we any 
Great Men? Purchasing Votes. The remedy sug- 
gested as might be expected from the title of the 
book is to have "a law declaring any candidate nomi- 
nated by any such political association inelligible to the 
office for which he is designated would restore the 
elective power to the hands of the people individually 
and protect them from the corrupting influence and 
competition of the present powerful parties." The 
objections to partisan politics (the last chapter) is a 
summary to the whole book, and this subject as a 
whole, is treated.in a very scholarly manner. 

Facts and Fakes about Cuba, A review of the various 
stories circulated in the United States concerning the 
present insurrection, by George Bronson Rea, who 
was field correspondent for The New York Herald. 
The incidents are narrated in a very vivid and natural 
manner ; the frontispiece illustrating " Gomez threaten- 
ing to Shoot the Author." The book from a histori- 
cal stand-point is very instructive. We also have in 
our College library two other books on Cuba namely, 
" The Cuban question in its true light," and " New 
constitutional laws of Cuba." 



AGGiE LiFE 



103 



The Atmosphere, A very instructive book, fully and 
beautifully illustrated, is a translation of the French, 
by Camille Flammarion and edited by James Glais- 
her. As has been said the book is beautifully illus- 
trated for many of the plates are colored, representing 
the subjects of such titles as " Summer Landscape," 
"African Mirage " and " Sunset at Sea." Experi- 
ments relating to the atmosphere as Torricelli invent- 
ing the barometer and Lavosier analyzing atmos- 
pheric air are carefully explained and illustrated. The 
book contains about 453 pages which thoroughly and 
scientifically treat of the peculiarities and character- 
istics of the atmosphere. 

The Study of Breeds, By Thomas Shaw is another 
very interesting book. The different breeds of cattle, 
sheep and swine are treated very instructively. The 
characteristics of each breed are here noted and care- 
fully explained. 

Catalogue of Fruits, A bulletin published by the U. 
S. department of Agriculture. Its direct value is based 
on the fact that it gives the best fruits for cultivation 
in the various sections of the United States. The 
work has been published after a great deal of expense 
and experiment, and is of great value to one working 
in Horticulture. 

Among the minor important works that have come 
into the library are the following ; 
North American Zoology by George Ord. 
Dissection of the Ophidian, by D. S. Kellicott. 
Elements of Descriptive Geometry, by Mab Cord. 
Principles of Political Economy, by J. S. Nicholson. 
'99 Index, published by the Junior class. 



NIGHTMARE OF A FRESHMAN SIGN SWIPER. 

He turned and tossed upon his bed. 

Repose he could not find, 
For all night long such things as these 

Kept coursing through his mind. 

" Keep off the Grass," and " Beer on Draught," 

" H-0," and " Pyle's Pearline," 
" Look out for paint." and "Use Pear's Soap," 

Were signs which he had seen. 

And in the midst of all these 

A demon seemed to dance, 
Who asked him with a fiendish grin, 

" I say, ' Do you wear pants ?' " 

— Harvard Lampoon. 



When Adam gave in Eden's shades 

Each animal his name. 
He noticed one among the rest 

That traveling had made lame. 

For it staggered as it walked along, 
Coming from regions far . 

Old Adam chuckled gleefully, 
And said — a jag-u-are. — Ex. 




104 



AGGIE LIFE. 



LOVE'S TOKEN. 
The frost and snow of mistletoe. 

The warmth of holly berry. 
These I combine. lady mine. 

To make thy yule-tide merry. 
And shouldst thou learn, sweet, to return 

My love, nor deem it folly. 
Twined in thy hair the snow fruit wea.r 

And on thy breast the holly. — Ex. 



CARKNTa ^ AOK^HOUSt 



Kh" 






A^V1a$f , Mass, 



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AGGIE LIFE. 



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ALSO 

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MANUFACTURER OF 



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And we beg to announce that we usually have a surpUis 
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For information address, 

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Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night callj responded to at residence, first door 
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and Carpet Rsnovatiii Estabiisliment, 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work takeu Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

Office : 
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KAZORS HONED. BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

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THeLtailliiyPlotograplier 

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102 Main St., opp. Court House, 
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AMHE RST H OUSE 

FIRST-CLAS S IN EV ERY PARTICULftR. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Manager. 





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TYPEWRITERS OF ALL MAKES SOLD. EXCHANGED AND REPAIRED. TYPEWRITERS RENTED, $3 PER MONTH- 

For illustrated catalogue and full particulars write to 

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Established 1845. Tel. 2423. 



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fM 





VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MARCH 2, 1 



NO. 9 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 

Terms $1.00 per year in advance. Single copies, IGc. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Randall D. Warden. '98, Editor-in-Chief. 

Alexander Montgomery, Jr., '98. Business Manager. 

Frederick H. Turner, '99, Ass't Business Manager. 
George H. Wright, '98. Willis S. Fisher, '98. 

Avedis G. Adjemian. '98. Warren E. Hinds, '99. 
William H. Armstrong, '99. Charles A. Crowell, Jr., '00. 
George F. Parmenter. '00. James E. Halligan, '00. 



Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed to Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 

Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Athletic Association. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
Base-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 
Ninety-Nine Index, 



W. S. Fisher, Pres. 

J. S. Eaton, Ses. 

R. D. Warden, Manager. 

G. H. Wright, Manager. 

J. P.Nickerson, Sec. 

J. S. Eaton, Manager. 

D. A. Beaman, Manager. 



Cdi'torials. 



Notice has recently come to us through reHable 
sources that Prof. Nelligan and the captain of the 
Amherst track team have cordially invited us to take 
part in a meet in heavy gymnastics sometime during 
this term. While it is unfortunate that our athletic 
quarters at present are in such a deplorable condition 
as to practically offer no means or opportunities for 
training our men, yet, we have some good talent in 
this direction which ought to be developed at this 
time of the year for the out-door athletics of the 
spring term. Since the Amherst men have shown 
such a friendly and sportsman-like spirit towards our 
success it would seem discourteous upon our part not 
to reciprocate and join to the best of our ability 
with them in the proposed meet. While it cannot be 
expected that we shall prove even competitors with 



them in many events, still it will be of inestimable 
value to us and perhaps to some extent a benefit to 
them. So far there have been no officers elected 
for the management of the athletic team during the 
coming season. This oversight should be remedied 
at once so that something can be done towards taking 
advantage of this offer. 



It has been suggested, we believe with reference 
to the welfare of the students themselves, that during 
the spring term military drill be scheduled at an 
earlier hour than formerly ; that is to say, as early as 
7-15 in the morning with reveille sounding at 6-30, 
and chapel either after the drill or in the afternoon. 
The benefits which would be derived from this arrang- 
ment are obvious. First in importance would be the 
absolute freedom of the afternoon for the practice of 
the base-ball team and for whatever other recreation 
was desired upon the part of the student. Again, the 
cool bracing air of the morning would do away with 
the heat and the perspiration of drill and would go 
far towards compensating for the extra exertion of an 
early toilet. Of course the responsibility would rest 
somewhat heavily upon the drummers on whom we 
should be obliged to rely for a successful culmination 
of the morning's drill ; still should they lose, " its all 
the go," and afterwards, for them, an extra drill on 
Saturday morning. It might be questioned whether 
the earliness of the hour would not interfere with the 
attendance of students not rooming in the college 
dormitories yet, even they would be compensated for 
their exertion. The one thing which occurs to us as 
interfering with early morning drill, is the dew, which 
would prevent movements in extended order, unless 
rubbers or some other means of protection were worn 
by the cadets. However, we believe that the general 
sentiment is tov/ard a change of this kind and we 
hope to see the suggestion acted upon. 



AGGIE Life. 



There will be but one more issue of the Life under 
the present management after which the '98 Editors 
will return to the seclusion of private life. We say 
return with a feeling of quiet content, not from any 
unpleasantness which has arisen ; not from any dislike 
for the freedom of the press ; but simply from the 
peaceful satisfaction of knowing that we have fulfilled 
our contract and have finished. We shall miss a few 
conveniences, perquisites if you will, v/hich go v/ith 
the plant. We shall miss our extensive correspond- 
ence and the social pleasure of proof reading. No 
more shall the humorous articles of our contributors 
cause ripples of merriment to run through our sanc- 
tum. Never again will we burn the midnight oil. 
But like twinkling stars behind the clouds we shall 
shed our light in unseen splendor. We shall leave 
the paper in better hands than ours. In our writings 
we have left little that in future time shall be quoted 
on the pages of history, yet, the judgment of our work 
must not be too harsh by those who have yet to see 
the sun rise as oft as we. If we have spoken some- 
times severely of men and places, satisfy yourselves 

that we could have said more, but some things are 

best left unsaid. We ought to eulogize everything in 
general and nothing in particular, but we cannot feel 
equal to the occasion. Agriculture would be our 
theme. We would immortalize it. We would cry it 
above the skies. But we cannot. We are not 
George Washingtons. How we would like to tell 



some things are better left unsaid. Perhaps v/hen 
we are gone, other editors can express the sentiment 
which we feel unequal to. 



A SUMMER'S OUTING WITH NANSEN. 

LECTURE DELIVERED BEFORE THE N. H. S. SY PROF. 
EMERSON OF AMHERST COLLEGE. 

The third lecture before the Natural History Society 
was delivered by Prof. Emerson of Amherst college 
on the evening of Feb. 18, to a fair number of students 
in the stone chapel. The speaker was introduced by 
Pres't Warden '98. His lecture was about a trip 
which was taken among the fiords and peninsulas of 
Norway. There were five men in the party, two from 
Yale, a Norwegian professor, Dr. Nansen and the 
speaker. When the party landed at the post of Christi- 
ana they saw Dr. Nansen waiting for them on the wharf. 
He was dressed in an easy suit of grey, flannel shirt and 



slouch hat, and to the speaker at once brought to 
mind a baseball player. He is a muscular man and 
a man who could endure much hard travel. These 
men were to travel about Norway on a geologizing 
expedition. 

The trip was made on Dr. Nansen's yacht. The 
party started up a fiord near Christiana and then took 
a train inland. The trip up the fiord was like a sail 
up the Hudson, the firs coming down close to the 
water's edge. In some places the yacht sailed so 
near to the cliffs that you could almost touch them. 

Wherever the party landed, there would always be 
a crowd to welcome Nansen. The streets would be 
decorated and hung with flags. Everywhere Nansen 
was treated as a national hero. In one place where 
they stopped for. dinner, the townspeople arranged, 
after the repast, a fete in his honor. He replied to 
this show of affection in a speech full of patriotism 
and love. A great many times as Nansen's boat 
passed a government steamer, the larger craft would 
salute and at these times Nansen was always very 
careful to step to the rail and respond to this sign of 
his countrymen's love for him. 

The party went down the harbor and were shown 
over the Fram by its inventor. It is rather high built 
in the poop deck region, but on the whole, broad and 
squatty. It is built and rigged for both sails and 
steam power, but on first sight no stacks can be seen. 
The boat is built so nearly round, that it pitches badly, 
as there is no keel but only a keelson. The hull is 
made of Alpine oak beams, very strong and twisted, 
and having such curves, that it is not necessary to 
shape them much to use them in the hull. The boat 
is shaped so like a saucer that it can not be caught in 
the ice but will slide upwards when between two cakes 
or floes. It is made of a double layer of planks, and 
is braced inside with solid oak beams so that it is 
nearly solid, as far as the ice can affect it in any way. 
The beams are kept from slipping by iron girders 
across the boat. We have Nansen's word that the 
boat never creaked seriously in all her trips. 

Inside, the cabins are arranged so that all light and 
heat may be obtained and yet no heat wasted. The 
boat has electric lights. The walls are double and 
stuffed with asbestos to prevent the fire from spread- 
ing, if such a thing as a fire occurred. A double roof 
helped them to avoid the moisture which is usually 



AGGIE LIFE. 



very troublesome at a temperature of from 20° to 60°. j 
On deck, where you would expect a rudder was a 
hole where the rudder was shipped. This contrivance 
enabled them to pull up the rudder when in danger of 
ice breakage. There was no trouble with the rudder 
in all his voyages. Owing to his good success, Nan- 
sen has in mind a trip through the unexplored sea 
around Greenland. 

The trip ended with a dinner at Bray, a small town 
in Norway. Nansen said at parting, " I have had a 
good time. I did not know much geology when 1 
started, and now I am anxious to learn more." 



STUDENT LIFE. 



LECTURE DELIVERED BEFORE THE N. H. S. BY DR. 
CHARLES WELLINGTON. 

It seems that Pres. Goodell is not the only interest- 
ing lecturer among our faculty. Friday evening Dr. 
Wellington did both himself and his subject extraor- 
dinary credit. Nothing could be more pleasing than 
the interesting and jovial manner in which he brought 
out the five points of his lecture. His subject, " Stu- 
dent Life," was near to us all and out of the sixty or 
seventy present at the lecture, not one went away feeling 
that he had not had at least one new phase of college 
life impressed upon his memory. 

Dr. Wellington opened his lecture by comparing 
the lives of two students. He told of the student life 
in Germany, with all its pleasures and related 
several amusing incidents connected with the 
life of a German friend whom he became acquainted 
with during his studies in Leipsic. Perhaps the most 
amusing incident in the professor's German life was 
the time when he was called upon at a German 
Kneipe to sing an American Indian song. It is per- 
haps needless to say that he received several encores. 

In contrast v/ith the rollicking life of the German 
student. Dr. Wellington placed that of Thomas Edi- 
son, who, starting without money or education, has 
worked his way by study up to the highest rank of 
inventors, and who has spent one fortune after another 
for the benefit of the human race. He is a true 
student. 

After thus comparing the two kinds of students he 
made a classification of the students in college to- 
day. In the first class he placed the freshmen and 
juniors; in the second, the sophomores and seniors; 



and in the third, the faculty. He then spoke of the 
rules of the college. In olden times the rules were 
very strict and even fines were imposed, but now 
everything is changed. The college should be run by 
as few rules as possible, and if possible without any. 

In looking forward, he likened the four classes now 
in college, to a strong four-spanned bridge, the first 
span of which ('98) we are now nearly over. He then 
spoke of the relation of the students to the faculty. 
On the students depends the success of the college, 
the faculty will make only those rules which are neces- 
sary for the students. Thus they should work to- 
gether, the one aiding the other. 

In closing Dr. Wellington remarked on the men we 
should choose for teachers. We can learn more 
from Carlisle, Shakespeare and Goethe, than from 
the writers and teachers of to-day. Let us choose 
truly great men for our teachers. 

D. '01. 



JAPAN THE NA TURAL MUSEUM OF SCIENCE. 

BY OKUJIRI KOCHI. 

Dai Nippon, as we call our beautiful land of Japan, 
occupies a significant position on the globe. Lying in 
in the Pacific ocean in the the temperate zone, it 
bends like a crescent of the continent of Asia. In the 
extreme north, the distance from the main land of 
Asia is so slight that the straits may be crossed easily 
in a canoe, while that of the southern end from Corea 
is but one day's sail. For four thousand miles east- 
ward stretches the ocean, shored in by the Columbian 
continent. 

The surrounding ocean and the variable winds tem- 
per the climate in summer ; the Black Stream of the 
Pacific modifies the cold of winter. A sky such as 
ever arches over the Mediterranean bends above 
Japan, the ocean walls her in, an ever green and fer- 
tile land is hers. 

The seas of Japan are probably unexcelled in the 
world for the multitude and variety of the choicest 
species of edible fish. The many bays and gulfs 
indenting the islands have been for ages the happy 
hunting grounds of the fisherman. 

The rivers are well stocked with many varieties of 
fresh-water fish. In the northern provinces, the finest 
salmon exist in inexhaustible supply, while almost 
every species of edible shell -fish, moUusca and crus- 



ioS 



AGGIE LIFE. 



tacea, enliven the shores of the islands, or fertilize 
the soil with its catacombs. So abundant is fish that 
fish fertilizer is an article of standard manufacture, sale, 
and use. The variety and luxuriance of edible sea- 
weeds are remarkable. 

The botanical wealth of Japan is very great. A 
considerable number of vegetable species has doubt- 
less been introduced by human agency into Japan 
from the Asiatic continent, but the indigenous plants 
and those imported by natural means are very 
numerous. The rapid variations of temperature, heavy 
and continuous rains, succeeded by scorching heats 
and the glare of an almost tropical sun, are accompa- 
nied and tempered by strong and constant winds. 
Hence we find semi-tropical vegetable forms in close 
contact with those of the Northern temperate type. 
In general, the predominant nature of the Japan flora 
is shrubby rather than herbaceous. 

The geographical position of Japan hardly explains 
the marked resemblance of its flora to that of Atlantic 
America on the one hand, and that of the Himalaya 
region on the other. Such, however, is the fact; the 
Japanese flora resembles that of Eastern North Amer- 
ica more than that of Western North America or 
Europe. 

The fauna of the island is a very meagre one, and 
it is also quite probable that the larger domestic ani- 
mals have been imported. Of wild beasts, the bear, 
deer, wolf, badger, fox, and monkey, and the smaller 
ground animals, are most probably indigenous. So 
far as studied, however, the types approach those of 
the remote American rather than those of the near 
Asiatic continent. 

The most of the Avifauna of Japan agree with 
American species which are distributed over a great 
part of the continent, others show such slight differ- 
ences in size, color of plumage etc., as the jay, cuckoo, 
robin, and red-breast, that they can hardly be 
allowed to rank as independent species. Others again, 
such as the pheasants, link themselves especially with 
North Chiiiese fauna, while tropical genera are occas- 
ionally represented. 

In the vicinity of the larger cities like the suburbs 
of Tokio or Osaka where the natural beauty is erased 
by the material improvement of the modern civiliza- 
tion, and where but few of the smaller birds are ever 
heard. The tourist may think that the songsters 



have been omitted from the catalogue of natural glo- 
ries of the Empire, but if he advance a step further 
and enter the grove in a country. 

"Seine Naclitigall tont Schlumnner herab auf ilin 
Seine Nachtigall weekt flotend ihn wieder auf. 
Wenn das liebliche Frulirot 
Durch die Baum' auf sein Bette scheint." 

Amongst the many species of singing birds the 
Uguisu or the Japanese nightingale is the sweetest of 
all. It sings in low and flute tones, and also revels in 
the great variety of notes, so that if we listen to a half 
dozen or more of these birds singing around us, — 
some at the beginning, others again near the end of 
their song, we could imagine that we were listening to 
the voices of a choir. 

The insects are -also abundantly represented. The 
general character of the particular classes thoroughly 
corresponds with that of the northern temperate sec- 
tion of Europe. There are added also a series of 
tropical forms, which are equally striking in figure, 
color, and mode of life, as, the species of the 
genera Papilho and Mantis. 

I can, however, not describe this multitude of minor 
creatures, but I truly say that we have too many 
insects. Like the locusts, they are here, as every- 
where, lovers of the warm sunshine, and are liveliest 
when the sun is exerting its full force, and when the 
song of the birds is hushed by it. About the middle 
of May their ear-splitting noise begins, and is con- 
tinued into September. The mountains and bushes 
are filled with their noise, which strikes the ear shrilly 
from a great distance. 

In addition to a good soil, Japan has been gener- 
ously endowed by the Creator with mineral riches. 
Most of the useful varieties of stone are found through- 
out the Empire. Granite and the harder rocks, through 
various degrees of softness, down to the easily carved 
or chipped sandstones and secondary formations use- 
ful for fortifications, buildings, tombs, walks, or walls, 
exist in almost every province. Gold and silver in 
workable quantities are found in many places. Cop- 
per is very abundant, and of the purest kind. Lead, 
tin, antimony and manganese abound. Of zinc and 
mercury there is but little. Iron is chiefly in the form 
of magnetic oxide. It occurs in the diluvium of rivers 
and along the sea coast, lying in beds, often of great 
thickness. The first quality of iron may be extracted 



-^' 



AGGIE LIFE. 



log 



from it. Petroleum issues from the ground in the 
northern provinces. The ocean at some portions on 
the coast of those places is said to be smeared with a 
floating scum of oil for miles. 

The healthful air, fertile soil, temperate climate, and 
natural beauty of the country formed the physique and 
character of the nation of Dai Nippon. Can this great 
nation have been born in a day? It is natural,for the 
curators of this great museum to become the most 
important players on the scientific stage of the nine- 
teenth century. 

Early in the eighteenth century there was a treatise 
on natural history, consisting of one thousand parts, 
and at that time Ranzan Ono, the naturalist had 
nearly one thousand pupils. Over three hundred Jap- 
anese works on Botany existed before 1868, and the 
Botanic Garden of the Imperial University was estab- 
lished in 1681. The treasury of the Western civiliza- 
tion was first opened by a Dutch key. The visits of 
Thunberg (1775) and Siebold (1821) had their due 
effect on natural history studies. 

A v/ork on the use of the microscope was published 
in 1801. With the restoration in 1868 a new period 
began, and the modern Japanese schools of zoology 
date from the appointment of Prof. E. S. Morse to 
the chair of zoology in Tokio in 1877. Prof. Whitman 
introduced modern technical methods in 1879. 
Since 1881 the development of zoology in Japan has 
been entirely in the hands of Japanese, and a vigorous 
school has sprung up, as all zoologists are now aware. 



THROUGH THE SPECTATOR'S GUSSES. 

It is seldom that the Spectator has the opportunity 
of attending three such lectures as fell to his lot dur- 
ing the past few weeks. It has often been said that 
the art of platform lecturing was like the art of 
Praxitiles — -lost to the world. No such enthusiasm is 
manifested now as once attended the advent of an 
Emerson lecture, or of a Thoreau, for that matter. 
Perhaps the Emerson's are few in number during 
these days of the decadente, and the Thoreau's 
are all dead. 

Be that as it may, the art of lecturing has not 
entirely passed beyond our ken, when our own small 
town can boast of three good speakers in as many 
weeks. The mode of placing before the public the 
wisdom and experience of ages has varied as our 



tastes have changed, but there will always be a 
demand, however limited, for this same platform work. 
It may be, and the Spectator will not deny it, that 
public enthusiasm is more latent than in the days of ■ 
Curtis ; that we do not impatiently await the evening 
when a Parker is to speak to us ; but if we do not 
manifest that tumultuous joy once evinced by our 
elders upon such occasions, we, nevertheless, fully 
appreciate the efforts of our speakers and if our physi- 
cal manifestations of approval be not so hearty as of 
yore, our deeper emotions are just as sure and lasting. 

He who holds the attention of the multitudes.who 
causes their tears to flow or their laughter to ripple 
out upon the evening air, has struck as true a note as 
ever was touched by the eloquence of Burke or of 
Henry. Human nature is much the same to-day as 
it was when Anthony harangued a hungry mob surround- 
ing the body of a dead Caesar. The efforts of Sumner 
were but duplicated by him who won a presidential 
nomination through the seductiveness of his well- 
chosen words. 

Within our midst we have harbored that oratorical 
genius the past few weeks. We have been treated to 
didacticism(if I may be allowed to use the word)in 
contradistinction to pure oratorical word-painting. 
The one has relieved the other : and each stands 
before the mind the more prominently because of the 
other. Each has its part to play, but the latter is the 
less frequently found as its interpreters are the less 
numerous. Pure didactic speaking is less liable to 
commit errors than its more emotional brother as it 
appeals to the intellectual faculties where as oratory 
is a play upon the feelings The one influences the 
scholar : the other sways the multitudes. 

The speakers, whom the Spectator has in mind, 
were in thorough rapport with their subjects, and so 
the effect of their words was deeper than otherwise 
could be. The scholar treated his subject with all 
the love and reverence it deserved ; the orator trod 
the paths made dear to his memory by suffering 
and patient endeavor. From the one was obtained a 
knowledge of the sages ; from the other, the pathos 
of the poet. The one was strong in action, decisive 
in gesture, and careful in technique ; the other was 
spontaneous in the admiration he expressed for his 
dead comrades, poetic in the pictures he drew of their 
past suffering, and loyal in his attitude to home and 
country. 



no 



aGGiE jLii^'ii:. 



The orator left an impression not soon to be 
eradicated from the minds of those who listened to 
his impassioned words and glowing descriptions ; and, 
while the audience listened breathlessly, the Specta- 
tor closed his eyes and dreamed that the days of 
Curtis were once more a blessed gift of the present. 

The Spectator. 

A STORY OF WAR TIME. 

It was at the close of a beautiful day in summer 
that Emily Bradford stood upon the large veranda of 
an old mansion, which bore the traces of better days, 
though it was still in good repair. The sun was just 
sinking behind the western hills, and the sky was crim- 
son with the glory of a midsummer's sunset. Emily 
Bradford, just eighteen years of age, stood gazing at 
the beautiful scene, her face aglow with a color not 
unlike that of the distant sky. 

It was not until the glowing pageant above had dis- 
appeared in the wake of the slowly sinking sun that 
she ceased to gaze, and turned to enter the house to 
clear away the remains of the evening meal. It was 
evident that her heart was glad to-night, for through 
the open windows of the house came the soft, sweet 
music of a rich contralto voice. 

Close beside the house and spanning a river v/as a 
bridge which, being upon the main highv/ay, was 
much used for travel. Whenever the clatter of 
horse's hoofs upon the bridge announced the approach 
of travelers, the girl's song would cease, until the 
rumbling of wheels made it certain that a vehicle was 
attached, when she would resume her singing. 

Having finished her task, she returned to the 
veranda, and throwing a light shawl over her shoulders, 
seated herself in the hammock. Hardly had she sat 
down, when there was a clatter of hoofs upon the 
bridge, and a man mounted upon a large black 
charger turned Into the yard. Drawing rein at the 
hitching-post, the rider dismounted and tied his horse ; 
then turning he went up the steps. As he did so, the 
young girl sprang up to greet him. 

" Hello Sis !" he exclaimed, as he recognized her. 

" Hello Brother!" she replied. " What has made 
you so tardy to-night ? I thought you were not com- 
ing." 



" 1 received a letter by the last mail, and as it was 
necessary to reply at once, I went to town to mail the 
answer," he explained. 

" As though a letter could be of such moment," 
she added playfully. 

" Of course," he replied in the same spirit, and 
leading her to the hammock, he brought up a chair 
and sat down beside her. 

Now, these two young people were not brother and 
sister, as may be supposed, but growing up together 
from childhood, they almost looked upon each other 
as such. The estate of Hon. Henry Foraker joined 
that of the Bradfords, and Em.ily and Henry Foraker, 
Jr. had seen each other every day for more than fif- 
teen years. They had played together in childhood, 
and had gone to school together, and a sincere and 
enduring friendship had sprung up between them. 
They were of nearly the same age, young Foraker 
being one year older than Emily. 

The scene of this story is laid at the time of the 
Civil War, and the incidents just related belong to the 
summer of 1861. Young Foraker had received a 
letter offering him a commission in the cavalry, and 
he had gladly accepted it, but not without certain 
pangs he knew not why. It was owing to the necessity 
of dispatching a reply that he was delayed upon this 
particular evening in his visit to Emily, and his reply 
to her playful remark as to the importance of his 
answering the letter contained a deal of hidden truth 
and meaning. 

It was specified in the letter that, if he accepted 
the commission, he should start on the 17th, which 
would be on the morrow following this very evening. 
As he mounted the steps of the veranda, and for the 
first time realized that this meeting must be the last 
for many months, and that perhaps he would never 
return from the war, he understood the meaning of 
the pangs he had experienced when accepting the 
commission, and he wondered how he should tell the 
news to Emily. 

The conversation that followed was at best a dull 
and lagging one for, in spite of himself, the young 
man could not get out of his mind the sad thoughts 
which had lodged there ; and his heart was throbbing 
with a new feeling, as he looked at the lovely girl 
before him. To make her sad was to double his own 
sadness, and his lips were dumb. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Ill 



As the fog from the river grew more dense, the 
veranda became too chilly for comfort, and Emily 
suggested that they go into the house. Henry rose, 
he decided that now was the time to break the news, 
and as soon as both were seated in the parlor, he 
said : 

" The letter that I was speaking to you about this 
evening, Emily, was the offer of a commission in the 
army, and as I believed that it was my duty to accept 
it, I wrote at once to headquarters. The thought of 
leaving home and friends has filled me with a sadness 
that I cannot get rid of." He stopped here, for he 
wished to see how she would take this news before 
he told her all that was in his heart, and he waited 
for her reply. 

Emily knew that war was raging in the South, and 
she remembered the stirring scenes of three months 
before when the men had gone off to the war but, 
somehow, it had never occurred to her that Henry 
would ever enlist, and the suddenness of the whole 
matter for the moment unnerved her. At last she 
spoke. "Oh Henry ! is it possible that you are going 
off to the war!" she said, and overcome by her feel- 
ings, she wept. 

The war which was to try men's souls, and which 
had already tried the hearts of many young men and 
women, was making itself felt in the hearts of these 
two young people to-night. The ties which bound 
them together and which they had been content to 
call friendship, they were soon to find to be a deep 
and holy love. 

As Henry drew his chair near that he might take 
Emily's hands within his own, he felt the v/arm tears 
dropping, tears which burned his very soul, and he 
knew that the love in his own heart was returned. 

They sat thus for some time. Henry was first to 
break tne silence, saying: " I, myself, had not thought 
to leave so soon for the war, though I have long 
cherished the hope of doing something for my country 
but when the offer of a commission came, I felt it my 
duty to accept and could not refuse. Mother's home, 
as you know, is in the South, while father is a New 
Englander. Very little has been said about the war 
in my hearing at home, and I have been guided 
in the matter solely by my own judgment and wishes. 
Of course I consulted both father and mother before 



making a decision, and, though mother cried much. 
she offered no objections, and father thought I was 
making a wise choice. So you see I go with both 
father's and mother's blessing, and Emily," he could 
contain himself no longer, " Oh Emily ! I love you 
and I v/ant your blessing too ! Tell me that you love 
me, and I can go even to the field of battle with a 
glad heart," and he pressed her hand. 

She wept again ; but not with tears of sorrow ; — 
sorrow was forgotten for the moment. They were, 
tears of joy — joy such as only lovers feel, and it was 
such a joy that overflowed Emily's heart when Henry 
declared his love for her. 

" And do you need an answer ?" she asked, as she 
nestled her head upon his shoulder, and he kissed her 
tear-stained cheek in reply. 

They sat for a long time talking over Henry's plans 
for the future, and it was quite late when he at 
last rose to leave. As they stood upon the steps to- 
gether, gazing into the clear sky and watching the 
moon in its course through the heavens, but one 
thought was in the mind of each : how, not many 
weeks distant this same moon would be shining on 
the white tents of an army encamped on some dis- 
tant battlefield, and on men, rolled in blankets, 
stretched around a southern camp-fire. 

The moment for parting came at last. Pressing 
her to his heart, he kissed again the fair cheek of 
that beautiful face so charming in the midnight moon- 
light, and gently releasing himself he went down the 
steps, untied his horse, and mounted. Driving close 
beside the step, he took her hand once more and 
pressed his lips to it. Then releasing it, he bid her a 
fond adieu and putting spurs to his horse galloped 
away. 

Emily watched him till he disappeared over the 
hill, and then turning she went into the house. 

Everett. 

[To be concluded.] 



Beautiful maid, 

Babbling brook. 
Simple " Cholly," 

Anxious look ; 
Maiden yawnetli, 

Opened book, 
" Cholly " tumbled, 

" Cholly " snook. — Ex. 



1X2 



AGGIE LIFE. 



j^o'tes and ^ommfn-fes. 

Intense excitement has prevailed throughout the 
country since the disaster by which one of our best 
warships was destroyed in the harbor of Havana. 
Rumors of war were immediately heard from all 
directions ; and the newspapers have been filled ever 
since with startling headlines. There can be no 
doubt that the Spaniards have no friendly feelings for 
_the Americans just at this time ; but that the Spanish 
officials were partners in such a diabolical act seems 
incredible. That such a catastrophe could have 
occurred through negligence or from lack of discipline 
is out of the question. That it was an accident does 
not, under the circumstances, seems probable. What- 
ever the cuase of the disaster, we may be sure that 
the board of investigation will render a fearless, 
impartial verdict. The policy of our government 
is against war. 



We learn from the papers that the noted French 
author, M. Zola, has been condemned to a term of 
imprisonment after what seems to be a very unfair trial ; 
inasmuch as he was not allowed to defend himself 
from the charge brought against him. French justice 
seems to us to be at times very one-sided. Popular 
feeling and prejudices are very strong among them and 
when these are directed against the prisoner, his case 
seems to be practically decided. 



No one can say that the Mass. Agricultural College 
is at all behind hand in the matter of baseball. The 
first //^/(3' practice was held on the the 25th of Febru- 
ary. No ground was visible, but the team secured a 
good deal of practice in batting and throwing, on the 
crust of ice, on the snow. The team has been at 
work for some time in the drill hall, and the men have 
recovered the power to hold a ball, or to hit one, as in 
days of yore. The men are taking quite an interest 
in the practice and there is no doubt that the college 
will be represented on the diamond as well as in 
previous years, if not better, as there is quite a deal 
of good material in the entering class and most of 
last year's players are still in college. 



In addition to the usual course in junior English, 
Professor Mills has assigned some outside reading to 
the class. This is to include Shakespeare's " As 
You Like It," Thackeray's " Henry Esmond," History 
of England during the reign of the Stewarts, and 
Macauley's " Essay on Milton." This makes a con- 
siderable addition to the work of the term but we 
welcome it as an aid to our study of English Litera- 
ture. Two examinations will soon be held to cover 
this course of reading. 

* * 

* 

The series of lectures given under the auspices of 
the Natural History Society this term, has been very 
instructive and entertaining. The course this year 
has been an imprpvement over that of former years, 
and has attracted many outsiders and townspeople. 
The students have supported these lectures by their 
good attendance and show a tendency to continue to 
do so. 

—Call off. 

— Sabre Drill. 

— Who goes home to vote ? 

— Who will answer Uncle Sam's call for volunteers ? 

— On Friday, Feb. 17th, Professor Brooks addressed 
a farmers' institute at Hadley. 

— A. A. Boutelle '99 has left College on account 
of ill health, but hopes to return next year. 

■ — W. P. Cutter, librarian for the Agricultural 
department at Washington, D. C, visited the College 
library, Feb. 14. 

— Saturday, Feb. 19th, the "last chance" condi- 
tion examinations in mathematics were largely 
attended in the new Physical laboratory. 

— On Friday evening, Feb. 18th the Mathematical 
division of the Senior class took dinner and spent the 
evening with Professor and Mrs. Ostrander. 

— The roof of the Experiment station (chemical) 
sprung a leak during the recent storm. The archi- 
tect from Holyoke, after examining the break, declared 
that a new roof would have to be put on. The work 
will be' started immediately and it is hoped to have it 
finished before the new laboratory is opened. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"3 



- — The theme of Dr. Walker's sermon of Sunday, 
Feb. 20th, was patriotism. The manner in which the 
choir rolled out " My Country 'tis of Thee " at the 
close of the service was ample evidence that they 
were filled with it. 

— The weather, the snow and the water, combined 
with careless exposure are to blame for a good many 
cases of colds, sore throats and grip. Among those 
unfortunates are Cooke, Bridgeforth, C. A. Crowell, 
Gile, Eaton, Macumber, H. Baker. 

— Baseball practice will begin at half-past four on 
drill days, and at four on other days. It would be a 
great boon to the baseball team if drill should come the 
first thing in the morning during the spring term, as is 
now being agitated among the students. (See another 
column.) 

— For the past week we have had the exhilarating 
and somewhat rare sport of walking on the crust. It 
elates the soul to tread with impunity on the springy 
snow, over meadows, pastures, fields and swamps, 
where in summer we would get stuck in the mud, or 
be ordered to keep off the grass. 

— On last Friday evening Dr. Wellington delivered 
a most interesting lecture before the Natural History 
Society on "College Life." The Doctor's wide 
experience both as a professor and a student, enabled 
him to treat his subject in a comprehensive manner. 
For a further account see another column. 

— In the spring, part of the recently acquired Clark 
property will be surveyed and laid out for an orchard 
for commercial purposes, and the standard varieties 
of apple trees will be set out. Between the apple 
trees, peach trees will be set in. Before the time 
comes when the apple trees will cover the space 
allotted them, the peach trees will be through bear- 
ing, and be cut out. 

—This has been an unfavorable winter for the Polo 
Association, there being no opportunity either to prac- 
tice or play games. The manager of the association 
has had a dozen good sticks waiting all winter for the 
ice that came not. But the bill came and the asso- 
ciation has levied a tax of 25 cents on college mem- 
bers. It is unfortunate that we've had no polo weather 
but the sticks will be good for next year and the bill 
must be settled, so walk right up and pay your 
quarter. 



— At a recent meeting of the Athletic Board Mr. 
A. S. Kinney '96 was elected secretary and treasurer 
in place of Prof. R. E. Smith, resigned. It was also 
voted that the College baseball team could play no 
games until the money pledged for football had been 
paid. This is undoubtedly a wise action as the men 
will find out that the money pledged must be paid, 
otherwise we will have no more athletics here. 

— A large number of students took advantage of 
Washington's birthday to visit their homes and friends, 
while another part, also of considerable numerical 
strength spent the day in making up back work. At 
noon when all strong men were at the boarding club 
the time-honored question "Who was George Wash- 
ington? " was sprung by Mr. Nickerson of the Senior 
class and the enthusiasm with which the club mem- 
bers responded would certainly have been an inspira- 
tion to the previous Sunday's sermon. 

— A Dairy Institute will be held at the chapel on 
the morning and afternoon of Saturday, March 5th, 
under the auspices of the Massachusetts Creamery 
Association and the Massachusetts Dairy School. The 
program is as follows : 

Forenoon, 10 O'clock. 
H. C. Burrington, Instructor and Expert, Mass. Dairy School. 

"Separator vs. Cooley Creamer." 
Music, Zither Solo, Mr. W. H. Armstrong 

Dr. J. B. Lindsey, Hatch Experiment Station. 
" Mutual Relations of Creamery, Patrons and Experiment 

Stations." 
Discussion and Question Box. 

Dinner will be served free. 

Afternoon, 1-30 O'clock. 

E. G. Curtis, formerly Instructor Wisconsin Dairy School. 

"Cream Ripening. Use of Acidity Tests." 
Prof. P. S. Cooley, Mass. Agricultural College. 
" Payment by the Babcock Test." 
Music, M. A. C. Banjo Club 

Prof. Wm. P. Brooks. Mass. Agricultural College. 
" How to Meet Western Competition." 
Discussion and Question Box. 



lumni. 



'87. — James Marsh is in Pactola, S. D. for his 
health. He writes that the climate agrees with him 
and that he is doing nicely under the favorable con- 
ditions. 

'91. — H. J. Field, secretary and treasurer Franklin 
county agricultural society. 



ii4 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'92. — William Fletcher, clerk at "New England 
House," Boston, Mass. 

'92. — H. M. Thompson of the botanic experiment 
station spent Washington's birthday with friends in 
Great Barrington. 

'92.— G. B. Willard, book-keeper for Fred H. 
Klrwing, Waltham, Mass. 

Ex. '94.— F. W. Park, optician, 49 Kirk St., 
Lowell, Mass. 

'96. — H. W. Moore has recently been appointed a 
Notary Public by Gov. Wolcott. Address, 25 Am- 
herst street, Worcester, Mass. 

'97. — H. F. Allen, No. Bascawen, N. H. Sup't 
Poultry Farm. 

'97.- — G. D. Leavens of the experiment station has 
been spending the past few days with friends in 
Providence. 

'97. — During the past week H. J. Armstrong, H. 
F. Allen, and G. D. Leavens received notice from 
the U. S. War department that their names have 
been placed on the U. S. army register as the three 
cadets from the Mass. Agricultural college who had 
distinguished themselves in cadet service. 

'97. — Upon Friday evening, Feb. 18, G. A Drew 
and C. A. Peters joined the Amherst Grange. 



FARMING IN GERMANY. 

The German Empire includes an area about one- 
ninth less than that of the single State of Texas in the 
American Union. It lies between latitude 47'^ 30' 
and 55" 30' north. The climate is, however, much 
modified by the gulf stream being much less severe 
than that of similar latitudes on the American Conti- 
nent. It varies widely in different portions of the 
Empire ; but is in general mild, equable and salubri- 
ous. The winters are shorter and milder than those 
in Massachusetts, while the summers are cooler than 
ours. The average rainfall is but little more than 
one-half as great as in Amherst. In this climate 
flourish all the important crops which are cultivated 
here except Indian corn which is for the most part 
grown only for fodder. 

The present population is about 50,000,000. The 
average number of individuals per square mile in the 
German Empire is 237 ; in Texas it is 9 ; in Massa- 
chusetts, 320. Massachusetts does not impress one 



who has traveled its length and breadth as crowded, 
yet we import practically all the great staples of life 
consumed by our people. Our bread and meat are 
produced beyond our borders. In the German empire 
on the contrary, is produced most of the food of its 
teeming millions. Germany though smaller than 
Texas produces seven-twelfths as much grain, exclu- 
sive of corn, as the whole United States. Including 
corn the United States produces a little less than four 
times as much grain as Germany. On the other hand 
Germany produces more than five times as many 
potatoes as the entire United States, and is to be 
credited further with the production of one and three- 
fourths millions of tons of sugar from the beet ; while 
we produce only about one-sixth as much from the 
cane, the beet and the maple combined. In thejight 
of these general statements and of the further fact 
that the acre product of all great staples is in Ger- 
many much larger than in the United States it becomes 
evident that some study into the conditions affecting 
German farming will be of interest. 

A determination to do no injustice in the compari- 
sons made between American and German agriculture 
compels the statement at the outset that in Germany 
a much larger proportion of the total area is under 
cultivation than in the United States. Indeed the 
general impression gained by a traveler in Germany 
is that every square foot is improved. The complete 
absence in most parts of the empire of waste and 
unproductive areas, scrubby wood lots, tangled lines 
of fences and corners grown up to briars and brambles 
impresses one from rural New England most strongly. 
Statistics show that in Germany no less than ninety- 
four per cent, of the total area is productive. In the 
United States but fifteen per cent, of our total area is 
returned as improved, in Massachusetts the propor- 
tion is forty-one per cent. Here are wide differences 
which serve in considerable measure to account for 
the relatively large aggregates of staple crops pro- 
duced in Germany. It is, however, important to know 
that in the latter country forests are returned as pro- 
ductive areas, v/hile in the United States they are not 
so returned. Facts justify this difference in classifi- 
cation. In Germany the character of the forest 
growth is controlled by planting or skilled manage- 
ment. Forest land is made to produce valuable tim- 
ber trees exclusively and the forests return a good 



AGGIE LIFE. 



115 



income to their owners. With us. on the contrary, 
such land is as a rule utterly neglected, and. produces 
a mixed and usually inferior growth. Forest fires here 
cause enormous damage ; and forest land, though 
occasionally valuable when by happy accident spared 
by the flames, has generally but little worth. Differ- 
ences in economic conditions, chiefly as regards the 
prevailing rates of wages in the two countries, would 
make modifications in the German system of forest 
management necessary to adapt it to our needs ; but 
something in the direction of reform in our treatment 
of forest lands we can and should do. 

Farming in Germany employs forty per cent, of the 
total productive population. In the United States the 
proportion is given in recent reports as somewhat less. 
8,000,000 are employed in Agriculture in the German 
empire ; while in the United States the number is 
8,500,000. Agriculture in Germany is under the pro- 
tection and patronage of the aristocracy ; a large pro- 
portion of the wealth of the country is interested in it. 
The agrarian party exercises a dominant influence in 
political matters ; the land-owning aristocracy in large 
measure shape and control the national development 
and life. The sons of the large landowners are many 
of them trained and educated as farmers. 

[to be continued.] 



LIBRARY NOTES. 
The " German Agricultural Society" under the 
protectorate of the Kaiser with eleven thousand 
members is a powerful force in German Agriculture. It 
is subdivided into seven sections and twenty-five special 
committees, and with its large means, distinguished and 
rare talent, and national character, it works on a 
grand scale. It conducts exhibitions, establishes 
museums, controls stations and carries out scientific 
and practical investigations. No interest in agricul- 
ture IS omitted from its careful and scientific super- 
vision. Its publications, while voluminous, are very 
carefully edited and printed, though it must be con- 
fessed they appear in the antiquated German script. 
The most important of these works are among the 
recent rich additions to our college library. They 
consist of the eleven yearly reports or year books since 
1886, the date of the foundation of the society, and 
also about two dozen monographs by eminent men on 
subjects of special importance. Each of these series 



will be increased by regular publication. It is hoped on 
a future occasion to present to the readers of the Life 
a birds-eye view of the contents of this exceedingly 
valuable acquisition which at present amounts to 
nearly ten thousand octavo pages. The library num- 
ber of this set is 630-665. 

A very attractive book A^hich was written last year 
by William Jasper Nicholls is entitled The Story of 
American Coals. The book is divided into four parts 




ii6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and treats this matter very systematically, considering 
the origin, development, transportation and consumption. 
The first part consists of a treatise on the history and 
theories concerning coal. The last three parts con- 
sider this matter as it appears at the present time. 
The book is bound very attractively and contains 
over four hundred pages. Library number is 549- 19. 

To one who is interested in American History and 
Literature, Donald Mitchell's work on American Lands 
and Letters, from the time of the Mayflower to Rip 
Van Winkle, will be found very interesting. The book 
is divided into seven chapters with over three hundred 
and seventy-five illustrations. The history of " The 
Winthrops " is very unique and interesting. In 
chapter six we get a fine idea of Washington Irving 
as in other chapters we find some new facts concern- 
ing the early colonists in their early colleges like 
William and Mary,' and Columbia. Many of the 
illustrations are comparatively new and aid in making 
the book a valuable work to which one may refer. 
Library number 820-54. 

The year of 1896 marked a half century in the 
history of the Smithsonian Institution and to com- 
memorate this event an imm.ense volume of over 
eight hundred pages has been published. It is edited by 
George B. Goode. The history and progress of this 
Institution has been carefully traced since the will of 
James Smithson in 1826. The book is the result of 
a great deal of labor and as a matter of education 
will be found very instructive. Library Number 
507-2. 



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AGGIE LIFE. 



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AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AUITY STJtEEr, AMHJERST, MASS. 



L. W. GIBBS & CO., 

Jaimbs E. Stintson, Manager, 

CLOTHIERS and FURNISHERS. 

.ALL THE NKVV THINGS IN 

NPX'KWEAR, HATS AND CAPS, 

GOLF SUITS, &<•. 



Cook's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



:e=z2-^:e^:lv£-a.oist. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and niglit callj responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

*Co-Operati¥e Steai Laundry « 

and Carpet Renovating Estalillslinient. 



I 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Worlc takeu Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

Office : 
Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 




(flatehmakep and Optieian. 

Prompt skillful attentio^i given to all fine 
and complicated watchwork. 



AGGIE LIA? 




96 KEATING BICYCLES 



FOR S50. 



MTIlf © ©] 



©5 Si®©, 




AGENT. 



PHOTOGRAPHIG STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A.. J. ^oh: 

108 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 

HEADQUA RTERS FOR AGG!E STUDENTS. 

HAZR DHEBBIHa ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 



THeLsaillqgPliotoirapligr 



OF WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS. 



Work Guaranteed or money refunded. Give us a trial. 



102 Main St., opp. Court House, 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE EOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Lovelly 



The Photographer y 

To the class of '97 M. A. C. MAKES A SPECIALTY 
OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Grotips, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 
AMHERST, MASS. 

5, K. BENN ETT. 

Jeweler, 
Optician, 
Watchmakej . 

FIRST DOOR FROM POST OFFICE. 

FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES.. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED 



Aggie life. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Uooks, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL.. 



AMHE RST H OUSE 

FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Manager. 




Do you know that a TYPEWRITER will save 
you TIME, make you MONEY and please your 
^v;^^*^ correspondents ? 
TOWER'S NEW FRANKLIN TYPEWRITER, PRICE $75.00. 

Is a first class type writer at a reasonable price. It is the simplest, lightest, easiest running, fastest, and 
the most durable typewriter made. On the majority of other high grade oiachines the carriage has to be 
lifted before the work can be seen. On the New Franklin the work is in sight from the time the first letter 
is written until the paper is removed from the typewriter. 

TYPEWRITERS OF ALL MAKES SOLD. EXCHANGED AND REPAIRED. TYPEWRITERS RENTED, $3 PER MONTH. 

For illustrated catalogue and full particulars write to 



CUTTEIR TOWEIR CO., 



12 A. Milk Stivet,- 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Established 1845. Tel. 2423. 










Among the improveraeuts for 1898 are full flush joints, internal seat post and handle (^^» 
bar post fastenings, self-oiling bearings, low frames and low crank hanger drop, nar- -^^^J 
row tread, new style handle bars, the most perfect crank hanger mechanism in 

existence. 

Stearns Chainless $125.00 

Stearns Specials 7.5.00 

Stearns Yellow Fellows 50.00 

Stearns Tandems 125.00 

ISl 






B^^ Write now for handsome illustrated catalogue, free on application. 

^ E. C. STEARNS ^ CO,. SYRACUSE. A/. Y, 



I 




I 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. S. GA'iES, D. D. S. 

hi N. BKOW^, D. D. S. 



TISTS. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. I^HTLLTPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LAK6E STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 



-ALSO 



STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 

A. J. MORaAN, 

Practical Horseshoer, 

Rear of Purity Bakery, 
AMHERST, MASS. 
^^Best of work guaranteed. 



C. R. EILDEIR, 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORKS. 



HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. 



var, Dir. bovmtton, 

MAKUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Bircii Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



RivEK Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



TEACHERS WANTED ! 

Over 4,000 vacancies. Faithful service guaranteed. Book 
■with free plans, lO cents. Blanks free. Address, 

Southern Teachers' Bureau Louiscille Kg. 







■■'^ DESIGNING, ETC. 



(Dassaehusetts Agpieultural College. 



AT THE 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Percligfon Horses and Soidoi Sleep 



And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



R. F. Kelton. 



D. B. Kelton. 



F. F. KELTON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Fresh and Salt Meats, 



PODLTBY, YEBnflBLES, FISJ HP OYSTESS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



AGGIE LIFE. 





''*^4^''^^^^' 



CAKKNta $, t\ouHmst 



K\ 



V? 



AnnasT, Aa$$. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
. . Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whettier an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without charge, in the 



A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co.3«'Broadway. New York 

Braneh Office. 626 F St., Washington, D. C. 




V/liere 

wet and Co'd . 

^Preva!l\\\\ musfjae ^chosen with v 




I 'ir/' Consider— If you can keep the wet out 
fi Of your riSe it will not rustnoifreeze. Only 



i. 



have Solid Tops, shedding water like a 
duck's back. Our 197-page book (just out) 
tells all about them. Up-to-date infor- 
mation about powders,black and smoke- 
less; proper sizes. Quantities, how to 
load ; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, 
jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom, etc.; 
trajectories, velocities, penetrations. All 
calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and 
1,000 other things, including many trade 
secrets never before given to the public. 
J^'ree if you will send stamps for postage to 
* Vat Mailia Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



If 



i 






VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST, MASS., MARCH 16, 1898 



NO. 10 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 

Terms $1.00 per year in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Randall D. Warden, '98, Editor-in-Chief. 
Alexander Montgomery, Jr., '98, Business Manager. 



Frederick H. Turner, '": 
George H. Wright, '93. 
.\vedis G. Adjemian, '98. 
William H. Armstrong, '99. 
George F. Parmenter. '00. 



', Ass't Business Manager. 
Willis S. Fisher, '98. 
Warren E. Hinds, '99. 
Charles A. Crowell, Jr., '00. 
James E. Halligan, '00. 



Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed to Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 

Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



t<v"i?%\\At«. V \iav,tViO\is,%^ ?*\\\'\%v,s. 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Athletic Association, 
Foot-Ball Association, 
Base- Ball Association. 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 
Ninety-Nine Index. 



W. S. Fisher, Pres. 

J. S. Eaton, Sec. 

R. D. Warden, Manager. 

G. H. Wright, Manager. 

J. P.Nickerson, Sec. 

J. S. Eaton, Manager. 

D. A. Beaman, Manager. 



lais. 



FAREWELL. 

Farewell ! ye readers. 
Fare ye well ! 
'Tis a happy greeting sent, 
'Tis a joyful parting rent, 
'Tis the gloomy time of Lent, 
It is well. 

Farewell ! ye brothers, 
Fare ye well ! 

Here is to your great success. 
All your efforts here we bless. 
This is for a long, long rest. 
Fare ye well ! 



We see by the columns of the Student that the 
Amherst baseball management would like to have the 
use of our Drill Hall to practice their players at bat- 
ting. Remembering their several kindnesses hereto- 
fore we are only too glad to be of any assistance to 
them in their preparation for the coming season. 
The Drill Hall is at their disposal. 



Since our last issue we have heard no dissenting 
voice, no wild sibilant outcry against the proposed 
early morning drill, therefore, we believe that the 
hearty co-operation of both officers and men, with the 
Commandant of the Military department, will make 
this new departure of morning drill during the spring 
term a very acceptable change and one promising of 
the greatest success. 



There is to be held at the Boarding Club to-mor- 
row evening a Schlusskneipe from eight until nine. 
Those of our readers who are unacquainted with the 
significance of this short Dutch word will doubtless 
find it of interest to be present. Those who have 
basked before under the benign influence of one of 
these joyous occasions need no further call. All are 
cordially invited to be present. 



President Goodell has returned from Washington 
where he has been busily engaged in protecting the 
interests of the State Colleges. An attempt was 
made to do away with the sale of the public lands 
upon which part of the appropriations paid to the 
various State Colleges was dependent. But under 
the able surveillance of our honored President and his 
confriars the bill was defeated and for the present 
there is no fear that the bill will be brought up again for 
some years to come. We congratulate the President 
on his success. 



ii8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Again the Mass. Institute of Technology Battalion 
has extended to us an invitation to join with Brown 
and themselves in their annual Military prize drill at 
Boston. There is to be no battalion prize drill, how- 
ever, between Brown and " Tech," simply an individ- 
ual competitive drill between the three colleges in the 
manual of arms and bayonet exercise ; a squad of six 
men to be chosen from each to represent their college 
in each event. We understand that owing to the heavy 
expenses incured last year, this drill will be held in 
the South Regiment armory which has been the head- 
quarters of the " Tech " battalion for a number of 
years. It is intended that the dance be made a more 
prominent feature than heretofore. We do not know 
what the general sentiment is concerning this con- 
test ; it of course rests with the men themselves 
whether the invitation shall be accepted or not. Our 
sentiment, however, is of the " Do or die " order and 
if we have not yet received our just due, we should 
be for pegging away until we win. 



The baseball outlook for the coming season is 
brighter than for several years past. Ninety-seven 
has carried with her two of our best players but the 
positions they filled will be easily taken by new men. 
Practice has been carried on in the cage under Capt. 
Eaton's direction since the middle of the term and 
the men are beginning to show some baseball form. 
One of the requirements necessary in order to put 
out a successful team is enthusiasm en the part of 
the men, and in order to obtain this we must have 
competition. Let every man in College remember 
that, all the positions on the team are open for com- 
petition, that the best man will make the position and 
that the success of the team depends upon the individ- 
ual himself, and the faithfulness of his work. Let 
every man come out with a determination to make 
the coming season on the diamond a successful one 
for old Aggie. In speaking of practice we would 
especially emphasize the batting part, along which 
line the team has been especially weak during the 
past few years. Manager Wright has been very suc- 
cessful in arranging games, the schedule of which ap- 
pears in another column. 



— The Freshmen are having target practice in the 
gun shed. 



ACROSS THE CONTINENT. 

LECTURE DELIVERED BEFORE N. H. S. BY MR. CHARLES 
L. FLINT. 

The fifth lecture of the season given under the aus- 
pices of the Natural History Society has been ren- 
dered, yes, more than rendered. It has been im- 
pressed on the memory of the listeners in such a man- 
ner that it will linger there, probably for years. With- 
out doubt the lecture given on the evening of March 
4, in the chapel, was the best descriptive lecture ever 
heard here at the College. 

Mr. Charles L. Flint, who so impressed his lis- 
teners by his descriptions of nature's beauty, is an 
"Aggie" man, having graduated in '81. Nov/ a 
trustee of the College, he is doing much to push its 
good name to the front. 

Although the evening was stormy the chapel was 
filled. The College men were in evidence, but 
besides them a large number of the faculty and town- 
people braved the storm and enjoyed the lecture. 

" Across the Continent " — was there ever a subject 
more interesting to lovers of beautiful scenery. And 
where can we find it better than in our own Rocky 
mountains. Surely the deep canyons, high cliffs, 
peculiar rocks, and beautiful falls of our western states 
are unsurpassed, and when they are brought clearly 
before our eyes we can enjoy them with the feeling of 
pride that they are our own. So this subject, chosen 
by Mr. Flint for his lecture, was perhaps of more 
interest because the scenes evolved are a gift from 
nature to our own country. 

Additional interest was added to the lecture by the 
large number of stereopticon slides used to illustrate 
it. Every slide was clear cut and brought out more 
forcibly the word pictures of the lecturer. 

Denver, Col., is perhaps the best point this side the 
Rocky mountains from which to start on a pleasure 
trip across those vast mountain ranges. Its healthful 
climate attracts many visitors, and its central position 
makes it the business center of the Rockies. So Mr. 
Flint, in his lecture on a trip across the mountains, 
brought us to this city as our starting point. 

From Denver it is only a short distance to Pike's 
Peak, on the top of which is the government signal 
station, where a marvelous view of the panorama of 
the country can be secured. Descending from, this 
bleak mountain we were carried through the Garden 



AGGIE Lil^E. 



tig 



of the Gods with Its fantastic rocks and high spires of 
sandstone. We did not pause long here but were 
swept on through William's canyon, between its high 
walls. Then came the Cave of the Winds, and the 
next moment we were watching the red man of the 
plains and learning of his modes of living. Across the 
red man's plains we were carried and into the valley 
of the Green river beyond, where the green terraced 
walls of clay looked down upon us as we passed. Then 
through Echo canyon and under the Hanging-rock. 
The walls of the valley seemed to grow almost to- 
gether and we were swept out of a narrow opening, 
by Pulpit Rock, Dog Head Rock, 1,000 mile tree, 
Devil's Slide, and into Devil's Gap. This gap is one 
of the most bewildering passes in the mountains. 
There seems to be no exit, yet when the time comes 
the train will twist and turn, and pass out of some, 
hitherto unseen, opening. Emerging from Devil's 
gap we found ourselves in the Salt Lake basin and in 
another moment in Salt Lake city itself. This city, 
although built on barren land, has a refreshing and 
comfortable appearance. Large modern buildings are 
to be seen on almost every street. Perhaps the most 
interesting buildings in the city are the old Mormon 
tabernacle, and the new Mormon temple, just com- 
pleted. Pleasant trips can be taken from the city to 
the great Salt Lake, a body of water so saline that 
even fish cannot live in it. 

From Salt Lake city we were taken to the silver 
mines of Nevada and given an opportunity to see how 
unpleasant is travelling on the alkalic plains. We left 
the mines behind and took the train over the moun- 
tains. First came the wild scenery of Humboldt can- 
yon, then the picturesque mountain lakes, and then 
the ride down the mountains. Here it was that we 
were given a sight of the snow sheds erected along 
the railroad to prevent the snow from piling on the 
rails during the winter storms. On the downward 
run we saw logging camps, and hydraulic mining, and 
were finally carried into the American canyon. Pass- 
ing through this canyon we found ourselves in the val- 
ley and were soon in Sacramento. The most inter- 
esting objects about this city are the big redwood 
trees, found only a short distance away. Among the 
largest of these are the father and the mother of the 
forest and the grizzly giant, any one of which is nearly 
twice as high as Bunker Hill monument and which 



have stood as the sentinels of the Californian forest 
for over 3000 years. From Sacramento it is only a 
half day's staging to the famous Yosemite valley. 
Words cannot describe the beautiful scenery of this 
valley, it seems like a fairy land, and its visions will 
long haunt the mind of the visitor. Entering the val- 
ley through a narrow gap, the first marvel to attract 
one's attention is the Bridal Falls whose silvery spray, 
from the distance resembles the finest lace. Back of 
these falls can be seen Cathedral Rock and El Capi- 
tan, over two thirds of a mile high and one sheer 
descent. The Three Brothers and Sentinel Rock 
then come in the order named, but the most beautiful 
view in the whole valley bursts upon the sight as one 
turns a corner and looks far up the valley to see the 
great Yosemite falls. These falls are in three sec- 
tions, the first being about 1,600 feet high, and the 
total about 2.600. The roar of the falls is deafening 
and there is a grandeur about them that cannot be 
told in words. Further on, beyond the falls, one gets 
a glimpse of the handsome rock, which rises up to a 
height of nearly 5,000 feet, and seems like a dome 
sliced in half by some huge knife. Having seen some 
of the principal sights in this valley we were taken 
back to Sacramento. Another journey was made 
from this city to Mirror lake. Vernal falls, and Nevada 
falls, which next to the Yosemite, are the grandest 
falls in the Rockies. 

The next place of interest to which we were taken, 
was Los Angeles, that city which is part American, 
part Mexican. Delightful drives can be taken from 
here, one especially to Pasadena whose enormous 
agricultural resources make it seem like a second 
paradise. But we were almost through our journey 
and did not tarry long here. Hurrying northward we 
soon reached San Francisco. A few glances into 
Chinatown, a few views of the harbor, and while gazing 
in mute rapture at the sunset through the Golden gate, 
the great western portal of our country, the lecturer 
bids his audience good-night. 

D. '01 



To how many seniors does this apply ? 
Lives of great men all remind us, 

As their pages o'dr we turn, 
That we're apt to leave behind us 
Letters that we ought to burn." — Ex. 



120 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE ISLAND OF JAMAICA. 

LECTURE DELIVERED BEFORE THE N. H. S. BY DR. CLARK 
OF AMHERST COLLEGE. 

Friday evening, March 1 1 , the college had the 
pleasure of listening to Dr. H. L. Clark, a son of our 
esteemed former president. 

Last summer Dr. Clark with a small party was 
sent to the Island of Jamaica by John Hopkins Uni- 
versity in the interests of marine fauna. The voyage 
lasted five days, the island of Cuba, 80 miles from 
Jamaica by direct route, being sighted on the fourth 
day out. This side the Gulf stream little of interest 
was seen, but beyond it flying-fish and the seaweed 
of the Saragossa sea were common sights. Reaching 
the Island we enter the harbor of Port Antonio, a 
very pretty and tiny harbor. 

We find the town well-built and ornamental with 
stately public buildings and leading from the city to 
the country are smooth level roads which delight the 
eye of a bicyclist. The population of the island 
numbers twenty thousand, half of whom are full- 
blooded English, the other half being blacks and 
maroons. 

The educational resources of the country are poor- 
ly developed and all_ the schools are sectarian. Rail- 
roads have been built within the last few years so that 
traveling is easily effected. 

The natural products of Jamaica are the banana, 
the cocoanut, and the sugar-cane. The banana is 
the chief article and enormous quantities are exported 
to the United States. For assistance in cultivating 
these crops coolies are imported from India and 
employed, as they are more reliable than the natives. 
The climate in winter is very mild, the average tem- 
perature being about 85 degrees. 

The flora are very luxuriant. Many varieties of 
wild flowers grow upon the plains and along the river 
banks. On the island are nearly 200 species of inter- 
esting birds, of which 40 species are peculiar to that 
locality. 

The Blue Mountains are especially picturesque. 
Blue Mountain Peak rising 7400 feet above the sea 
level is a very attractive climb for tourists. 

Dr. Clark closed his entertaining talk by inviting us 
all, if fortune favored, to visit the island and see it for 
ourselves. 



THE HONOR SYSTEM IN EXAMINA TIONS. 

The greatest of the many difficulties that the pro- 
fessional teacher has to encounter in his work, is in 
connection with examinations. Whether in college 
or preparatory schools, those engaged in the work 
of instruction have their attention called repeatedly to 
cases of dishonesty in examinations. Statistics show, 
however, that this cheating may now be confidently 
said to be diminishing, especially in those institutions 
where the honor system is in vogue. 

The honor system is used by a majority of leading 
universities and colleges throughout the country, and 
all of these report that there is far less cheating with 
the honor system in force than there used to be when 
espionage was practised, and that which has helped 
other colleges to reach a higher standard ought to be 
equally applicable to ours. 

A short time ago a southern professor was asked if 
he favored the honor system. He replied, " I chose 
to trust the honor of the students and think I can 
safely do so. Where watching is depended upon a 
certain class of students v/ould rather enjoy evading 
such vigilance, while they would not cheat if put upon 
their honor," To be a recipient of a trust produces 
generally a desire to honor that trust. If the disposi- 
tion is manifested to treat each student as an honor- 
able gentleman just so far as he warrants this confi- 
dence, the disposition to cheat is taken away. The 
only effective means of securing general honesty in 
examinations is the development of a moral tone in 
student society. No rule for the attainment of this 
can be laid down beyond the exercise of tact and per- 
sonal influence on the part of the faculty and all others 
who should naturally take an interest in the student. 
The sooner such mutual confidence is developed as 
may warrant the complete withdrawal of espionage, 
the better it is for all. 

Where the honor system exists the penalty for it s 
violation is rightly more severe than in the old system. 
To abuse a trust is a graver offence than to outwit a 
police officer. In many colleges the experiment is 
being tried of leaving to the students themselves all 
cases of discipline. The chief difficulty to be en- 
countered in carrying out such a course is that stu- 
dents are naturally indisposed to act as informers 
against each other, and, therefore, unless students are 



AGGIE LIFE. 



121 



actuated by high principles it is impossible to pursue 
the plan of student self-government. 

In the University of Georgia and in Cornell Univer- 
sity there is a university court composed of one 
member from the freshman, two from the sophomore, 
three from the junior and four from the senior classes. 
The president of the university or some one or more 
members of the faculty are also members of this 
court. Any violation of faith is made the business 
of the class to which the offender belongs. To the 
court is submitted in writing all testimony relating to 
the case, and a majority of two-thirds is necessary to 
convict. 

In other institutions the student is required to sign 
a printed statement in these words before handing in 
his paper. " I pledge my word of honor that in pre- 
paring these answers I have not received aid from 
any person, book, manuscript, or any other source 
whatever." 

We should all give the college which has us our 
hearty co-operatron in its advancement, remember- 
ing that the reputation of our college is enhanced by 
the consistent work of the students, while by their 
v/rong-doing it is marred. But more than a man 
can injure his college, more than he can injure his 
classmates, he defrauds himself out of that which is 
more Important than is success here,-^a conscience 
quick to discern right from wrong ; and who will put 
his trust in the man who cannot deal honestly with 
himself ? 

We invite the attention of the faculty to this sub- 
ject, believing that the adoption of the honor system, 
would do much toward promoting the welfare of the 
college. S. 



THROUGH THE SPECTATOR'S GLftSSES. 

The Spectator remembers a conversation he once 
had with an editor of one of the large monthly maga- 
zines, relative to the influence of the typical college 
paper. The talk was of a friendly nature although 
there were differences of opinion expressed, and 
undoubtedly, much good was derived from the discus- 
sion which was held before an editors' club. 

The college paper is too often the organ of some 
special department to be entirely successful from an 
educational point of view. It is either a chronicler of 



athletic sports or it is a vender of cheap notes written 
up in a still cheaper manner. It may be, as in some 
cases, a purely literary venture, in the heavier sense 
of the word ; that is, it may deal exclusively in essays 
and criticisms or in dry sermons. Any of these 
excesses are to be rigidly avoided. 

The true college paper should be an organ of the 
college at large. Not the college bounded by the rec- 
itation room walls or the confines of the campus, but 
that broader college that includes the widespread 
homes of its alumni. It should be the living bond 
that unites the past and the present ; that welcomes 
the future with all its hopes and fears. 

The influence of such a paper is far stronger than 
students, in general, are prepared to admit, and its 
advocacy of a measure may mean much for the ben- 
efit of the institution that publishes it. Such a paper 
should never hesitate to discuss matters of administra- 
tion or offer words of advice when the editors feel that 
words from them are needed. But its influence can 
only be increased by judicious and dignified editorials, 
written in a broad and liberal manner. 

The Spectator realizes that it is asking much of 
young students to give of their time and effort 
for the advancement of their college paper, when 
such efforts as they may exert have their sole reward 
in a conscious satisfaction of having done a good deed 
or written a pleasant word. But students should be 
impressed with the idea that their paper is an integral 
part of college work and that it demands their attention 
just as does any other line of study in the curriculum. 

With this number of the Life, the Spectator 
understands that the present board of managers will 
resign their work to their successors, that they will 
lay aside those duties which they have performed so 
faithfully during the past year. As the new editors 
enter upon their duties, they must feel the increased 
responsibility of their position ; a responsibility made 
doubly heavy by the excellent work done by the resign- 
ing board. 

To the new editors, the Spectator would say a few 
words. You have been appointed to conduct your col- 
lege paper ; it is your duty to so conduct it that your 
associates will never regret the confidence that they 
have placed in your honor and ability. Choose wisely 
from among your number, such as you deem worthy 
of managing this enterprise and let your policy be 



122 



AGGIE LIFE, 



broad and liberal. You have been given a college 
office ; you should remember that it is a college trust. 

The Spectator wishes you all prosperity in the year 
to come, and all the honor that your efforts deserve. 
This department has been but a venture, hardly out of 
its embryonic stage, as it were, and with you rests the 
continuance of the good work that it was intended 
should be done within its columns. 

For the editors who are about to lay aside the blue 
pencil, the Spectator has only words of praise and 
sorrow. Praise for the work so faithfully performed, 
sorrow for the parting of friends at so early a stage of 
acquaintanceship. Upon the Spectator's part, there 
are only feelings of good comradeship and high regard; 
the past has been all that could be desired ; the future 
must mould its own destiny, while the present offers a 
meagre — 

AU REVOIR. 
Now Time, his fleeting course pursues, 
And, all unwearied in his ever ceaseless flight, 
Across the heavens' azure blue 

Strikes dumb the day, and draws the sable robe of night. 
So too, the day with all its fears 
Is but the living symbol of dead yesterday ; 
To-morrow, yet, is still unborn. 
Nor stops to rest apace, but swiftly speeds away. 
Waste not your time in ill dispute, 
But let your daily act be ever plainly writ, 
That tears of yours shall never flow 
In vain endeavor to erase a word of it. 

The Spectator. 



5"torles. 



THE EXPLORA TION CLUB. 

" Something must be done," said ' Billy ' Hawkins 
in a decided tone, bringing his hand down on his 
companion's knee with a resounding whack. " We 
must have some excitement, or the club will go to 
pieces." 

" Well," began the other, Arlie Dodger, startled 
out of a deep meditation by ' Billy's ' forcibly demon- 
strated remarks, " Fact is, things are dull, but then 
we can't have a Russian pianist every week, or a 
French novelist, or an English Earl. Still, I am 
tired of balls and whist parties ; they are too tame and 
conventional. It's just as you say, excitement is the 
life of this Club ; excitement that makes an impres- 
sion on the mind and sends a thrill through the body 



from top to toe. Yes, sir, excitement we want, ex- 
citement we shall have. How to get it is what cor- 
ners me." 

These two young men were seated in the smoking 
room of the Exploration Club at the Fifth Avenue 
Hotel. 

This well-known Club had been formed by a num- 
ber of wealthy gentlemen, who had travelled, much, 
hobnobed with great folk and who were considered to 
be of the very best New York society. Every ex- 
plorer of prominence was sure to be most hospitably 
received among the members of the Club. For the 
last month or two, however, interest had lagged, and 
without some new social excitement to bind the mem- 
bers together again, the Club would undoubtedly die a 
natural death from inactivity. 

Mr. Dodger thoughtfully scratched his head for a 
moment. " The Club might enter into politics, or 
perhaps — " 

"Oh! No, no, nothing of the sort," broke in 
Hawkins with a gesture of impatience. Then cock- 
ing his hat on the side of his head, and tapping his 
friend knowingly on the sleeve, said, " Only one 
thing will save the Club — an African Lion." 

"An African Lion! Good gracious! exclaimed 
the other, his hand raised in astonishment. " Start a 
menagerie, I suppose, and keep the beast here in — " 

" Calm yourself, my dear fellow, I mean a Social 
Lion, a great African explorer just back from the 
depths of the Dark Continent. We want a hero, 
Arlie, a hero crowned with laurel, a hero whom the 
ladies will worship, and in whose honor we can give 
the most select reception in New York. You catch 
my meaning, Arlie ?" 

" Yes," replied Arlie dubiously, " I understand what 
you want, but confound me if I know where to get 
one." 

" Now, there's Professor Schwidenhamer, the very 
man, but in answer to my cable-dispatch offering 
expenses and a handsome present, he utterly refused 
to be lionized. But the old fool shall come. My 
idea is this — " here ' Billy ' unfolded to his friend a 
plan to bring the professor to New York. 

One evening, two weeks later, the rooms of the 
Exploration Club were ablaze with light and thronged 
with the principal social celebrities of the metropolis. 
This was a ^rand reception and bail in honor of the 



AGGIE LIFE. 



123 



famous German explorer, Professor Schwidenhamer, 
late of Tootsewootse, Central Africa, 

The professor, though not handsome, had a fine 
figure and an enormous mustache. A heavy crop of 
red hair, and green goggles were among the points 
most noticeable about him. If this great explorer 
looked like a dry old fossil, he was not — quite the 
reverse. What a gay time he did have ! he chatted 
with the great people ; related his adventures, how he 
discovered the " Missing Line," shot enormous tigers 
before breakfast ; and discussed his next trip to the 
source of the Nile. 

With the ladies he was no less successful. " Isn't 
he charming," they cried. "Such broad shoulders, 
and how beautifully he dances." 

He even went so far as to make love to Miss Ruth 
Stanton whom ' Billy ' Hawkins thought so much of 
— happily " Billy " was far out at sea on his way to 
Bermuda at that time. The professor stole a kiss 
frorh the young lady when she was not looking. 
Mamma Stanton saw it too, but then Professor 
Schwidenhamer was old enough to be the child's 
father, and so different from that Mr. Hawkins. She 
watched them gliding gracefully over the floor, and a 
smile of satisfaction overspread her face as she noted 
envious glances shoot from the eyes of many a fair 
young girl. 

But the hopes of the aspirer are often checked, 
sometimes overthrown. In the very height of his 
triumph, dancing with the prettiest girl in the room 
and before the eyes of the most select society in New 
York the professor slipped on the well waxed floor. 
His partner clutched wildly at him, and only succeeded 
in pulling off a large red wig. As he struck the floor 
the mustache and goggles flew in different directions. 
The most remarkable transformation scene on 
record : Professor Schwidenhamer fell to the floor 
and in his place arose Mr. " Billy " Hawkins. The 
reception broke up. Mamma Stanton boxed the 
ears of the guilty young man, and marched the blush- 
ing Ruth off to the carriage. 

"Can you forgive me, Ruth," pleaded "Billy" 
when he met her a week later. 

" Why, yes," she laughingly replied, " you are a 
perfect actor, but I recognized you from the first." 

Toz. 



THE BUNCO MAN. 

" Well Cid, I say you're a lucky chap," said a 
brother detective to me about four years ago as he 
gave me a friendly slap on the shoulder. 

" How's that," said I (for as far as I could see my 
luck had been against me, as my rusty black suit 
showed only too plainly.) 

"What! haven't you received a letter yet ? No? 
Well, I don't think I'll tell you ; you will find out 
for yourself." 

I was wholly ignorant as to what he meant ; and try 
as I would I could not worm from him his secret. 
Then after having excited my curiosity still more by 
several off-hand allusions to myself and my future, he 
left me saying with a knowing laugh : 

" Well, old boy, I wish you good luck, and above 
all, if I don't see you again soon (for you know I'm off 
to-morrow) do your level best." 

That I was somewhat surprised at my friend's re- 
marks but slightly expresses it. If the man had asked 
me conundrums I would not have been more at a loss 
how to answer them. As it was I stood there, where 
he left me, watching his departing form till it was 
finally lost in the crowd ; and then turning I went to 
my lodgings. Here I found a letter awaitfng me. I 
tore it open anxiously, and read in it that one of the 
sharpest detectives in the city requested me to call 
on him in regard to a little* business, which, he said, 
might be worth my time. 

To make a long story short I obeyed the invitation 
and was told to shadow a certain man of whom I was 
given a complete discription. It was believed that he 
was practicing the bunco game. 

The next morning I entered upon my task with a 
light and hopeful heart. For two months I watched 
my man and his every move, but I learned nothing to 
warrant his being suspected. There was one thing 
that I did not like ; he seemed to have plenty of 
money but no occupation and he lived at one of the 
poorest of lodging houses. 

At the end of the two months I awoke one morn- 
ing to find my bird had flown. After a week's care- 
ful investigation I traced him to a swell summer re- 
sort. You may imagine my surprise, when I next 
saw him, to find that he had changed into an elegant- 
ly dressed young man, with his name registered as, 
Henry Bane, Banker, Chicago. 



124 



AGGIE LIFE. 



But I was not long in doubt as to v/hat to do, for a 
few days later, having n:iissed Mr. Bane, 1 asked a 
colored waiter if he could tell me where there was a 
good pool or billiard table. He looked at me hesita- 
tingly for a moment, but a crisp bill brought him to 
his senses and he directed me to go to the rear en- 
trance of the hotel and ask for the " Turkish Parlor." 

It was a matter of only a few minutes before I was 
ushered into as fine an apartment as I believe I have 
ever seen. There were easy chairs in profusion, a 
superb billiard and pool table and several card tables. 
All, notwithstanding, were abandoned except one 
where there seemed to be a very exciting game 
going on. I made my way to the group, unnoticed, 
and saw that which almost made me leap for joy, — 
for there, seated at the table were two men (one of 
whom I readily recognized) shaking dice for large 
stakes. Each was in the height of excitement which 
ended only when the fellow in whom I was interested 
won the last throw and pocketed twenty-five thousand 
dollars. Thus I now had a positive clue that I was 
dealing with a gambler, a man as shrewd as I had 
ever met with. He knew that if he won immense 
sums from these rich men they would never give him 
away for the sake of their reputations. 

The succeeding month was one of excitement for 
me, but how I learned that he was in league with an- 
other of his own stamp ; ■ how he played a game of 
" flip " with a farmer and ruined him, and at last how 
he came to be suspected by the guests of the hotel in 
general, I need not dwell upon. Suffice it to be said 
that I had gained sufficient evidence for his arrest, 
and when he arrived at the next hotel he found 
awaiting him there a policeman and carriage to con- 
duct him to a quiet bedroom to await his trial. 

That was the beginning of my detective career. 
When I had completed this tasK and received my 
reward I met my friend who had first spoken to me 
concerning the letter I received, and whom I now have 
good reason to believe was the cause of its being sent 
and of my success as a detective. 



Jr. to Soph.- 
Soph. to Jr.- 
Jr. to Soph.- 
Chronicle, 



-Do you know what '01 signifies. 

-Give it up. 

-Simple enough : nothing won. — Penn. 



A STORY OF WAR TIME. 

(Concluded.) 

General Rosecrans, after his successful defence of 
Corinth, had been transferred to the command of the 
army of the Cumberland. Establishing his headquar- 
ters at Nashville, Tennessee, late in the fall of 1862, 
he had collected there a large and powerful army. 
The Confederates under General Bragg were at the 
same time strongly intrenched at Murfreesborough, 
and the two hostile armies found themselves face to 
face, not thirty miles apart. 

General Rosecrans, wishing to dislodge the enemy, 
had resolved to send a spy through the Confederate 
lines to find out, if possible, the strength of the rebels. 
Through the recommendation of General Thomas, 

Lieutenant Foraker of S 's cavalry corps had been 

chosen to get the desired information. 

It was on a cold raw night In early December that 
Henry started out on the road to Murfreesborough. 
He was bound on a perilous journey — a journey that 
might cost him his life. The night was unspeakably 
lonely; rain was falling in torrents, gullying out the road- 
bed beneath his horse's feet and drenching him to the 
skin ; the sky was inky black. In spite of these dis- 
comforts and the danger attending his mission — a 
danger that he knew only too well — Henry was in 
good spirits. More than a year had passed since he 
had left Emily standing on the steps of her home 
among the New England hills. The memory of that 
night was fresh in his mind. He was thinking of 
Emily to-night as he rode along, wondering when he 
should see her again and little dreaming of the happi- 
ness that awaited him on the morrow. 

While absorbed with these thoughts, the sound of 
approaching horsemen reached his ear. He had just 
time enough to turn into a byroad, when a troop of 
cavalry galloped by. As soon as they were out of 
hearing, he regained the road and continued his way. 
His plan had been to ride as far as an old farmhouse, 
which he had observed sometime before, and then to 
put up his horse, going the rest of the way on foot ) 
but the darkness was so favorable he resolved to ride 
further. The lights in the houses along his way had 
long been put out, and nothing disturbed the stillness 
of the night, save the noise of his horse's feet, the 
swash of the rain, and the occasional muffled bark of 
a house dog. A? he rode over the crest of a hill, he 



AGGIE LIFE. 



125 



saw a few glimmering lights a few miles distant, and 
knew that he was not far from the enemy's lines. 
Riding a little farther, he soon caught sight of a build- 
ing, a little way off the road. Drav/ing rein he dis- 
mounted, and leading his horse, walked cautiously 
towards it. It proved to be an old deserted barn. 
Opening the door he led his horse in and closed the 
door again. After tying his horse, he took an old 
pail, and went in search of a well. He soon found 
one, and filling the pail he returned to the barn. 
Emptying into the manger a bag of oats that he had 
brought, he covered them with hay and placed the 
pail of water in the stall. He then looked at his 
watch. It lacked but ten minutes of midnight. Six 
hours still remained in which to reach the town. 

Leaving his faithful horse securely housed, he started 
off on the road to the rebel camp. He proceeded 
without mishaps until he knew that he must be well 
within the line of pickets. Crossing a field, he caught 
his foot in a root and fell. 

" Who goes there?" cried a picket, hearing the 
fall. 

Henry lay motionless, and the picket thinking, 
probably that he had been deceived continued on his 
beat. As soon as the picket was our of hearing, Henry 
crept along until out of danger ; then rising he hurried 
on. He soon reached the outskirts of the town, and 
took refuge from the storm in an old shed. The 
rain presently ceased to fall, and the stars came out 
one by one into a cloudless sky. At the first appear- 
ance of dawn, Henry left his cover and started for 
the town. He was soon the object of many curious 
gazes, but he did not heed them, walking along as 
though the streets were familiar to him from child- 
hood. 

The morning was well advanced, when walking along 
the main thoroughfare, he saw, to his great surprise, 
the familiar form of Mr. Bradford coming towards 
him. He turned about immediately and walked back. 
As Mr. Bradford came up, Henry spoke to him. 

" Why Henry, how came you here ! " exclaimed 
Mr. Bradford, stopping abruptly. 

" 'Sh, I am shadowed," replied Henry. " A man is 
following me. Let us v/alk along ; it will arouse sus- 
picion, if we stand here talking." As they walked on, 
Henry went a little in advance of his friend. They 
conversed in low tones when no one was within hear- 



ing. Mr. Bradford explained that he had been called 
to Murfreesborough on important business, and Henry, 
sure of the loyalty of his friend, confided the purpose 
of his mission to him. 

" The best way, Henry, will be for you to call round 
to my stopping place to-night," said Mr. Bradford, 
after they had proceeded quite a distance, " I want to 
talk with you about matters I dare not mention here 
in the street. I am staying at 508 Forbush Ave. 
You had better slip into this next store and throw this 
man off his guard. Good-bye for the present," he 
said, as Henry entered the store. 

Henry bought a dozen rolls, and returning to the 
street, went back along his old path Reaching a 
hotel, he entered and ordered a room and, by good 
chance, secured one facing the street. The curtains 
being down, he raised them at once, and looking out 
he caught sight of his pursuer on the other side of the 
sireet. Drawing back till out of sight, he kneeled 
down and crept up to the window, hiding himself be- 
hind the blind. After watching a few minutes, he saw 
the man walk off at a brisk pace. Believing that he 
was going for an assistant, Henry resolved to give him 
the slip. Going down to the office he paid his room 
rent, and told the clerk he was going out and would 
not return till night. Leaving the hotel he set out for 
Forbush Ave., and secured another room. He felt 
that he had now gotten rid of his troublesome shadow, 
and after dinner he spent the afternoon in sleep. 

As the clock struck seven he went out, and made 
his way to Mr. Bradford's. In response to his ring, 
Mr. Bradford came and admitted him. After a cor- 
dial greeting, they went into the parlor and proceeded 
at once to business. Mr. Bradford related all he knew 
concerning the enemy, and gave Henry some plans, 
which he had drawn of the fortifications. After busi- 
ness was over he said : 

" How soon must you return to the armiy, Henry? " 

" I am expected to-morrow night," Henry replied, 
" I left my horse in an old barn, a little way out of 
town, and my plan is to get to the barn to. night, spend 
to-morrow there, and at nightfall start for headquarters." 

"Oh well, you need not start for three hours yet. 
In fact it is better that you should wait," Mr. Bradford 
replied, •' Excuse me for a few moments," he said as 
he left the room. 

Henry sat with his back towards the door reading a 



126 



AGGIE LIFE. 



paper. The door of an adjoining room was opened 
and shut, and sonne one canne along the hall and 
stopped at the door, Supposing that it was Mr. Brid- 
ford returning, Henry continued his reading, but as no 
one came in, he turned to see who it was. 

" Emily ! " he exclaimed, springing to his feet. 
" Henry ! " was the answer, and Emily, whom he sup- 
posed far away in the North, fell into his outstretched 
arms. 

So unexpected was this meeting that Henry could 
hardly believe his senses but there was no m.istaking 
his own dear Emily. Leading her to the sofa, he sat 
down beside her. As soon as he could find words to 
express himself, he exclaimed. 

" How in the world came you to be here, hundreds 
of miles from home, in the midst of a rebel camp ? " 

" Oh, I came with father," she replied, enjoying 
his amazement. 

"Yes, I suppose so," he rejoined, "but" — and 
looking up he caught the merry twinkle in her eyes, 
and both laughed heartily. 

" Father was obliged to come to look after Uncle 
William's property, after his death," she explained, 
" and I persuaded him to let me go with him. We 
came before the city was taken by the rebels, and we 
should have returned before now, had this occupation 
not prevented our doing so. We shall leave just as 
soon as possible now, as father has finished his 
business." 

" Why, I did not have the remotest idea that you 
were within a thousand miles of here," Henry replied. 
" Mr. Bradford said nothing about your being with 
him." 

" Papa wished to surprise you," she answered, " and 
Henry you don't know how long the afternoon has 
been ! I asked papa why he did not bring you with 
him, and he told me of your being watched." At the 
thought of her lover's danger she involuntarily shud- 
dered. Henry noticing it, hastened to say, " Don't 
worry Emily, I think I am rid of the fellow," and he 
related his episode of the day. 

The conversation then turned to their homes. 
Emily told him of the many visits she had made to his 
mother ; she related how his mother had wept while 
reading the letters from her soldier-boy, and how his 
father, unable to contain himself, would rise and leave 



the room, until Henry's eyes grew dim with tears. 
She did not forget to mention the joy which his letters 
had given her, and of the many times she had thought 
of him in the months that had gone. i 

Henry, in time, related his experiences in the army, 
and at the mention of the dangers through which he 
had passed, Emily would weep. We told her of how, 
when on lonely picket duty, on the march, and in 
camp, his heart had been cheered at thought of her. 
As he looked at the beautiful girl before him, now blos- 
somed into womanhood, his heart beat furiously. 

' Emily! " he said, taking her hands and looking 
into her tearful eyes, " would you be willing to become 
a soldier's wife ? I shall get a furlough soon and shall 
come home. When I come, may we not be married 
in the little church, where we used to go to Sunday- 
school together ? " 

"Why Henry, I thought it was understood that we 
were to be married whenever you were ready, if papa 
is willing, didn't you? " she asked, looking up wonder- 
ingly into his face, and Henry bent forward and kissed 
her. 

They were sitting with Emily's head upon his shoul- 
der, when Mr. Bradford appeared at the door. He 
smiled when he saw them and came into the room. 
Both looked up as he entered. 

" Mr. Bradford," said Henry, rising to meet him, 
" Emily has consented to be my wife with your con- 
sent," and his honest blue eyes gazed into those of his 
true and trusted friend. 

" With my consent ; why do you think I would 
withhold that which would give my daughter happi- 
ness? " he playfully asked grasping Henry's hand. 

At his words, Emily sprang up and kissed him. 

It was now time for Henry to leave. " I suppose 
you do not go back to your room," asked Mr. Brad- 
ford as they walked to the door. " No, I shall make 
straight for the lines, " Henry replied. 

" Well, good-bye my lad," he said, grasping Hen- 
ry's hand once more. Then he retired leaving the 
lovers alone. 

The moment for parting had come again. Putting 
his arm around her shoulder, Henry gave his love a 
parting kiss- This time she gave him one in return. 
He then went down the steps and the door closed be- 
hind him. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



127 



Starting off at a brisk walk, he soon reached the 
outskirts, and approached the picket line. Passing 
this in safety, he hurried on, but he took the wrong 
route, and wandered about till nearly morning before 
reaching the old barn. He fed and watered his horse 
and spent the day sleeping on the mow. Awaking 
late in the afternoon, much refreshed, he saddled and 
bridled his horse and fed him. After eating a lunch, 
he mounted and set out Riding along his former 
route he had nearly reached the old farm-house, when 
an old man stopped him, saying, "Have yer found 
him ? " 

" Found who ? " asked Henry, stopping his horse. 

" Why, ain't you one of them fellers what's chasin' 
the Yank that got through the lines last night ? " asked 
the old man. 

Here was news. What should he say ? 

" Oh yes, I understand you now," Henry replied. 
" Have you seen any suspicious looking person ? " 

" No, I haint," but I believe he's round here some- 
whars." 

'' When did my comrades pass by ? " asked Henry. 

" Why bless yer ! they have been rummagin' the 
'vhole country round all day," the man replied. 

Here was a slip. It wouldn't do to show any igno- 
rance. " I know that you glooney," Henry hastened 
to say. ' ' but what I meant was, — when did they go 
past last ? " 

"Oh, about half -past five 1 reckon." 

" Well, I am Captain Cook of Hardies' division. 

If you see my men, tell them I am at Squire, let 

me see, what is his name ? " 

" Squire Fielding you mean, I reckon," broke in 
the farmer. 

" Yes, that's it, tell them I am waiting for them at 
Squire Fielding's." 

Henry's trained ears had caught the sound of 
approaching horsemen. Putting spurs to his horse he 
galloped away. He knew that his ruse would soon be 
discovered ; but his horse was fresh ; he would run 
for it. He heard the troop stop as the old man called 
to them. He had not gone far, however, when he 
heard the pounding of a whole cavalry company in 
full drive after him. He leaned low on his horse's 
neck and rode for dear life. House after house was 
passed, and still he kept the lead ; the pursuers were 
losing ground ; he looked around ; a solitary horseman 



was approaching ; he evidently rode a fresh steed ; 
was it friend or foe ? A shot rang out, and a bullet 
whistled over his head. There was no mistaking this 
and he drew his revolver. As the strange trooper drew 
near, Henry slackened pace, took aim at his foe and 
fired. The horse freed of its burden sprang ahead 
and vanished in the darkness. 

Henry soon reached the line, passed the picket, and 
rode into camp. Going immediately to General Rose- 
crans' tent he found the general just about to turn in. 
He handed over his notes and maps, and was then 
dismissed. 

He repaired at once to his tent, and was soon 
asleep. 

A few days later occurred the first battle of Murfrees- 
borough. Neither side won. On January 2, 1863. two 
days later,the armies met again,and the Confederates, 
badly defeated, withdrew from the town. 

About three months after the final defeat of the 
rebels, an orderly appeared one evening at Henry's 
tent, and handed a note to him. Tearing it open he 
read as follows : 

" In recognition of Lieutenant Foraker's service to 
the Union cause in successfully entering the enemy's 
lines and obtaining valuable information ; also in rec- 
ognition of his faithful service throughout the war, I 
do hereby grant him two months leave of absence, 
upon the return from which he is to succeed in com- 
mand of Company B, 4th Cavalry ; Capt. Rogers 
resigned. 

(Signed) Wm. Starke Rosecrans, 

Com. Army of Cumberland. 
April 4th, 1863. 

To Lieut. Foraker, 
S — '5 Cavalry Corps." 

Henry's joy knew no bounds. He could now carry 
out his plans. He made preparations that night for 
leaving, and the next morning found him on his way 
home, where after a two days' ride, he arrived safe 

and sound. 

* * * * * 

It was a beautiful evening in May. Upon the 
veranda of the Bradford home stood a happy couple. 
Henry and his love had this day been united in mar- 
riage in the little country church. They stood gazing 
into the rosy abyss of another summer's twilight. 
What two summers before had been the maiden's 



128 



AGGIE LIFE. 



dream, was now fulfilled. The maiden of yesterday 
was the bride of to-day. 

As Henry gazed at his beautiful wife he was con- 
scious of an ecstasy not expressible in words. As 
Emily looked at her handsome husband, attired in his 
army blue, she felt that her cup of happiness was full 
to the brim. 

A bird flying along the crimson field suggested Bry- 
ant's beautiful verses " To a Waterfowl. " With a 
slight paraphrase. Henry repeated the closing lines : 

" He who, from zone to zone, 

Guides tlirough tiie boundless sky thy certain flight, 
In the long way that we must tread alone, 

Will lead our steps aright. 

— Everett. 



These warm spring-like days remind us that it will 
not be long before the enthusiatic wheelman will be 
himself again. The reasonable prices at v/hich good 
wheels are being offered will induce more to join the 
devotees of the wheel than ever before. Already you 
hear students discussing their mounts for this season. 
It is often inconvenient for students to keep their 
wheels in their room, but there is no good place pro- 
vided elsewhere. Why not construct a row of stalls 
in the basement of South College ? This would cost 
but little and would be very convenient. 



The spirit of our forefathers spoke once more in 
the halls of Congress last week and once more de- 
clared in unmistakable tones: " Millions for defense, 
but not one cent for tribute." The confidence in our 
President shown by congress by placing $50,000,000 
at his disposal for defense is reassuring to every loyal 
American. It was a significant act, and it shows a 
policy of which we may well be proud. We do not 
seek for the glory of conquest ; but we must and will 
maintain the rights of United States citizens. The 
report of the investigation upon the Maine will un- 
doubtedly show Spanish responsibility for the dis- 
aster and for this Spain must answer. Rapid prepara- 
tions for defense continue throughout the war depart- 
ment. Work in the arsenals, navy-yards, and fortifi- 
cations is being pushed as rapidly as possible ; but this 
work is much more liable to produce peace than war. 



Spain is making desperate efforts to retain her 
colonial possessions, for her troubles are not confined 
to Cuba. Insurrection after insurrection has broken 
out in the Phillipine islands ; while the native Span- 
iards are chafing under their own government. The 
nation that once ruled the world so proudly is hope- 
lessly struggling against her fate. 



STATEMENT. 
Statement of the Business Manager of the Aggie 
Life for the year ending March 16, 1898. 



ReSOURCES. 



$ 35.57 
241.00 
183.00 



Cash. 

Subscriptions, 
Advertisements, » 
Total Resources. 459.57 

All bills against the Aggie Life have been paid for the year 
ending March 16. 1898. 
Signed : 

Alex. Montgomery, Jr.. 
Bus. M'g'r. 1897-1898. 
The accounts of the Business Manager of the Aggie Life 
for the year 1397-1898 have eeen examined and found corect. 
Signed : 
C. Wellington, 

Pres't Advisory Board. 



ilver to \% SelilussRiieipo Tliirsilas igiit. 

— Farewell. 

— Exams, next week. 

— C. W. Jones, 2d, 1901 has left college. 

— The Freshmen have resumed basket ball practice. 

— Crane 1900 will have the College Co-operative 
Laundry agency next term. 

— Otis 1900 has been called home on account of a 
serious accident to his father. 

— Root 1901 has been obliged to go home for a 
week or so on account of sickness. 

— Henry 1901 has returned from home, having 
entirely recovered from his sickness. 

— On Thursday, March 10th, Dr. Lindsey addressed 
a farmers' institute at North Brookfield. 

— Tuesday evening, March 8th, Professor Maynard 
addressed a meeting held by the Spencer Grange. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



129 



— D. F. Carpenter '86, Principal of the Deerfield 
Academy, visited the college on Saturday, March 5th. 

— B. K. Jones '96 has been elected assistant super- 
intendent of the Baptist Church Sunday school of this 
town. 

— We hear that the Worcester Polytechnic Insti- 
tute will not be represented by a base ball team the 
coming season. 

— C. A. Boutelle has been obliged to go home on 
account of ill health but expects to be all right by the 
first of next term. 

— W. R. Crowell 1900 and Dickerman and Cooke 
1901 have been sick with the grip and Mark Munson 
1900 has been sick with tonsilitis. 

— The Williston Seminary base ball team is for- 
tunate in having for a coach Keator, captain of the 
Yale team and the All American team in 1897. 

— The accounts of the Military Ball Committee 
have been examined by the auditor Prof, Geo. F. 
Mills and were found to be satisfactory in all respects. 

— On Friday, March 4th, Baxter and Adjemian 
debated before the Senior class on the question, 
" Resolved that intercollegiate football promotes the 
best interests of the colleges." 

— On March 5th, Hawley and Green from Storrs 
Agr'l College, members of the Associate Club of the 
C. S. C. visited the college. On March 12th, Pingree 
and B. H. Smith visited the club at Storrs'. 

— Dr. C. S. Walker is soon going to move down 
town and will occupy the new house below the town 
hall. Mr. H. M. Thomson and family will move into 
the house now occupied by Dr. Walker. 

— While practicing base ball a few days ago Dor- 
man was accidentally hit by a thrown ball and pain- 
fully Injured. Ball players should remember that 
.there is considerably more danger in playing inside 
than out of doors, and be particularly careful. 

— President Goodell has spent considerable time in 
Washington the past two weeks using his influence 
in defense of the Morrill Land Grant Bill which was in 
danger of being repealed. This would mean a loss of 
$25,000 a year to each state that supports an Agricul- 
tural college, so we are highly pleased with the out- 
come and congratulate President on his success. 



— We note with pleasure the rapidity with which 
the snow is disappearing. There will be enough left 
in drifts to eat maple syrup on during the Easter vaca- 
tion it is true, but on the smooth campus the snow 
will soon be a memory, and baseball will once more 
be king. 

—Thursday evening, March 10th, the following 
officers of the Young Men's Christian Association 
were elected for the ensuing year : Pres't, W. E. 
Hinds; Vice-Pres't, M. H. Pingree; Corresponding 
Sec, B. H. Smith; Recording Sec, C. W. Jones; 
Treas., George Bridgeforth. 

— This year the Amherst tov/n meeting was con- 
spicuous for its lack of scrappy debates and personal 
maledictions. Professor Mills was elected moderator 
and the dignity with which he executed his duties was 
to a large extent responsible for the orderly manner 
which characterized the meeting. 

— Mr. W. W. Stevens, Harvard '95, who is taking 
a post graduate course in Entomology and Botany, 
gave an interesting talk before the Entomological Club 
on Monday evening, Feb. 14. Mr. Stevens presented 
the subject, " Androdonia," in a very instructive man- 
ner, showing the result of careful preparation. 

— On Friday night, March 4th, we had the pleasure 
of listening to as fine a lecture as we have heard in 
our four years' experience here at college. It is sel- 
dom that we have an opportunity to hear a trustee of 
the college, and we appreciate the interest that Mr. 
Flint has shown in the welfare of the institution. 

— Thursday evening, March 10, the following men 
were elected to the Aggie Life Board for the ensuing 
year : From Ninety-Nine, W. E. Hinds, F. H. Turner, 
C. M. Walker, E. M. Wright and W. A. Hooker ; 
from Nineteen hundred, C. A. Crowell, G. F. Par- 
menter, J. E. Halligan, F. A. Merrill ; from Nineteen 
Hundred and One, A. C. Wilson and A. R. Dorman. 
At a meeting of the new board the following organiza- 
tion was formed : Editor-in-Chief, W. E. Hinds ; Bus- 
iness Manager, F. H. Turner; Assistant Business 
Manager, G. F. Parmenter. 

— During the past week the Mass. Fruit Growers' 
Association held a two days' meeting with the Worces- 
ter County Horticultural Society in Worcester, Mass. 
Mr. Cruickshanks, one of the former trustees of this 
college, was elected president, and Prof. S. T. May- 



130 



AGGiE ivIFK. 



nard was re-elected secretary and treasurer. The 
meeting was extremely interesting and profitable. 
Among the speakers were Mr. Willard of N. Y. state, 
one of the most successful plum growers in the coun- 
try, Mr. Hale of Connecticut, Prof. John T. Clark of 
North Hadley, Mr. Sharpe, the successful raspberry 
grower, and Mr. Warren, who is a noted authority on 
strawberry culture. The subject of peach yellows was 
discussed and on the matter being put to a vote the 
sentiment of the meeting was found to be against the 
proposed legislation against the yellows. On Wednes- 
day evening the association served a banquet which 
was followed by speaking and dancing. 

— The base ball schedule, corrected to date, and 
subject to the approval of the Athletic Board is as 
follows : 
Apr. 23, Haydenville at Amherst. 

" 27, Vermont Academy at Saxton's River, Vt. 
May 4, Northampton Y. M. C. A. at Northampton. 

" 7, Trinity at Harttord. 

" 14, Open date. 

'• 18, Maine State College at Amherst. 

"21, Williston at Amherst. 

" 25, Amherst Freshmen at Amherst. 

" 28, Northampton Y. M. C. A. at Amherst. 
June 4, Williston at Easthampton. 

— A dairy institute was held Saturday, March 5, in 
the stone chapel which was attended by about 450 
of those interested in the subject, including many of 
the leading dairymen and butter-makers of the state. 
At ten o'clock the party gathered and first visited the 
dairy school, observing with much interest the pasteur- 
izer, the separators, Babcock testers and the different 
modes of butter-making. Then returning to the 
chapel they listened to a thoroughly prepared paper 
entitled " The Separator vs. Cooley Creamer," given 
by Mr. H. C. Burrington '96, who is an expert upon 
the subject. He showed that in the majority of cases 
the separator is to be preferred to the old gravity 
system. Music in the form of a zither solo was then 
furnished by Mr. W. H. Armstrong. This was fol- 
lowed by Dr. J. B. Lindsey of the Hatch Experiment 
Station, who spoke in a general way concerning the 
" Mutual Relations of Creamery, Patrons and Experi- 
ment Stations." He showed in a most practical 
manner what the creamery should do for the patron, 



the patron for the creamery, and what the Experiment 
Station should do for them both. It was also shown 
that the farmer should not only understand how to 
breed a good herd but that he should be able to look 
out for the health of his animals, and how to feed 
them most economically. Co-operation among the 
patrons of creameries was strongly advocated. In 
closing, Dr. Lindsey said that the scientific reports 
concerning the investigations of the Experiment Sta- 
tions should be expressed tn the plainest of English so 
as to be readily understood by the average farmer. 
After the Question Box had been passed and all ques- 
tions satisfactorily answered the assembly repaired to 
the recitation rooms over the dairy school, where a 
bountiful dinner was served. At 1-30 Mr. E. G. Cur- 
tis, formerly instructor at the Wisconsin Dairy School, 
read an interesting paper upon " Cream Ripening, and 
the use of Acidity Tests." The bacteria of cream, 
many of which produce an undesirable flavor were 
spoken of and it was shown that many injurious 
bacteria may be destroyed by heating up to 155° 
F. or, in other words, pasteuring. Then a 
bacteria culture, or starter of a favorable form is 
added, thus imparting to the butter a uniform flavor. 
Mr. Curtis also showed how to test by the alkali test 
for acidity in cream in the form of lactic acid. The 
next speaker of the day was Prof. F. S. Cooley who 
spoke upon " Payment by the Babcock Test." The 
fact was brought out that in the old space system it 
was simply the quantity of cream without regard to 
quality that was considered, while in the Babcock 
system it is the butter-making capacity only of the 
cream that is paid for. Mr. F. G. Stanley then fav- 
ored the audience with a banjo solo which was well 
applauded. " How to Meet Western Competition " 
was discussed by Prof. Wm. P. Brooks in an instruc- 
tive address. He emphasized the points that the 
farmers must lower the cost of production, improve 
the quality of their products, and that they should 
co-operate in buying and selling. This closed the 
program and a hearty vote of thanks was given to 
Professor Brooks and his associates for the day's 
entertainment. 



'96. — Fred B. Shaw of South Amherst has gone to 
Pennsylvania.to take a special course in telegraphy at 
the polytechnic institution. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



n^ 



urrvni. 



73. — Professor Penhallow, who, after graduating 
from this college, assisted Dr. Goessmann at the 
experiment station, and later took charge of. Professor 
Goodale's classes in botany at Harvard from which 
institution he went to be president of the agricultural 
college at Yokohama, Japan, is now professor of 
botany at McGill university, Montreal, Canada. Pro- 
fessor Penhallow established the department of botany 
at McGill, superintended the equipment of the labora- 
tories, and has achieved much distinction as one of 
the foremost instructors there. 

78. — A. A. Brigham, professor of agriculture and 
mechanic arts, Kingston, R. 1. 

'87. — F. H. Fowler, first clerk, Mass. State Board 
of Agriculture. 

'94. — The engagement is announced of Mr. Lowell 
Manley and Miss Jennie B. Mason of West Roxbury. 

'94.— Elias D. White, East Point, Ga. 

'95. — C. B. Lane of the New Jersey Experiment 
Station addressed a farmers' institute at Middletown, 
N. Y., Feb. 19. 

'96. — Newton Shultis, with Mark Shultis, shipper 
of grain, Room 601 Chamber of Commerce Building, 
Boston. 

'97. — -P. H. Smith has been engaged to take 
charge of a large dairy in northern Vermont. H e 
leaves Amhest the 21st of this month. 

'97. — J. M. Barry writes from Florida that his 
landscape gardening for the railroad is rapidly pro- 
gressing and in order to finish his work before the hot 
weather sets in he has been obliged to increase his 
working force from 900 to 1200 men. 

Ex-'97. — Morris Cook, who, in company with his 
father, conducts a large market-gardening and flori- 
cultural establishment in Shrewsbury, was visited by a 
representative of the horticultural department of the 
college last week. 

The following recent graduates of the college were 
present at the meeting of the Fruit Grower's Associa- 
tion held in Worcester during the past week : '97, G. 
D. Leavens, C. A. Peters, G. A. Drew ; '96. Prof. 
A. S. Kinney, H. W. Moore, J. E. Green; 94, J. A. 
Gifford. 



SQUELCHED. 
Hark, a sound of merry laughter 
Mingled with the shout and song; 
Floating down the stairs and hallways. 
Where it lingers loud and long; 
And our neighbor, if we ask him 
" What's the meaning of it all ?" 
Tells us '■ 'Tis the Freshies 
On the west in the South Hall." — Ex. 



T/fEK/NGOFWHBELS, 

T/fE f DEAL Mount; r 

T//E EMBO&mE/iT OF' 
PE/iFECT/ 0//, :>% ( ^ j 



Why?. ''%'■ , 

■ ,\ RUTHf.,^EPRES£NTAnON.| 
Fv NTlR^; ^ATI5fACTI0M. \ 



3ATI5FACTI0M. 



t •!• +.■•(• ^• 






132 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO"0?Ef!aT!¥E SOCIETY, 
Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods, 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 



OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 



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D. H. KENDRICK, Manager. 



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Do you know that a TYPEWRITER will save 



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is written until the paper is removed from the tj-pewriter. 

TYPEWRiTERS OF ALL MAKES SOLD. EXCHAN3ED AND REPAIRED. TYPEWRITERS REi^TED, $3 PER MONTH- 

For illustrated catulogue and full particulars write to 



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Among the improvements for 1898 are full flush joints, internal seat post and handle 
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OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
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AMHERST, MASS 



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CLOTHIERS and FURNISHERS. 

ALL THE NP:W THINGS IN 

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Cook's Block, 



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Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
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Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night call 3 responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

0' 



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Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

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AGGIE LIFE. 




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PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



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Telephone connection. 

HEADQUA RTERS FOR AB6!E STUDENTS. 

HAIR DRESSIHG ROOMS. 

RAZORS HOHBD, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

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Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 




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Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mast. 



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The Photographer , 

To tlie class of '97 M. A. C. MAKES A SPECIALTY 
OF COLLEGE WORK. 



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Hand Cameras and Supplies in stocli, and always fresh. 
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LOW PRICES. 
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AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST, MASS., APRIL 20, 1898 



NO. 11 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
th« Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

WARREN ELMER HINDS, '99, Editor-in-Chief. 

FREDERICK HARVEY TURNER, '99, Business Manager. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Ass't Business Manager. 
CHARLES MOREHOUSE WALKER, '99, College Notes. WILLIAM ANSON HOOKER, '99, Alumni. 

BERNARD HOWARD SMITH. '99, Library Notes. FREDERIC AUGUSTUS MERRILL, '00, Through the Spectators Glasses. 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS CROWELL, '00, Exchange. JAMES EDWARD HALLIGAN, '00, Athletics. . 

ALLISON RICE DORMAN, '01. ALEXANDER CAVASSA WILSON, '01, 

Terms: $1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside ofi United States and Canada, 2Sc. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Hinds, Pres. Athletic Association, 

Y. H. Canto, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. P. Nickerson, Sec. Reading- Room Association, 



Ninety-Nine Index, 



D. A. Beaman, Manager. 



J. S. Eaton, Sec. 

G. H. Wright, Manager. 

J. S. Eaton, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Cdi-torials. 



While it may be customary for a new editorial 
board to outline its policy upon assuming control of a 
paper, we feel that it will be better for us not to tell what 
we shall do or what we shall not do ; for should we do 
so, we may sometime have occasion to wish that we 
had left those things unwritten. Still we feel in duty 
bound to say that we shall strive to do our best to 
keep the "Life" up to the high standard which has been 
set for us by past editors, and to m.ake the paper of 
interest and value to every student and alumnus of our 
college. We trust that our readers will be charitable 
with our mistakes, and that they will co-operate with 
us in promoting the best interests of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



Toward the end of the winter term a movement 
was made by the Junior class to inaugurate what is 



known as the Honor System in Examinations. To 
this end a committee was chosen to draft a constitu- 
tion for the approval of the class. This constitution, 
which has been accepted by both the class and the 
faculty, will be found in another column. We feel 
that this adoption of the Honor System for the first 
time in our college is a significant act as it comes 
from the students voluntarily. It means a much 
higher standard of scholarship than was ever attained 
under the old system, and a better moral sentiment 
among the students. It is a guarantee that those 
receiving diplomas have earned them. Is not this 
subject worthy of the consideration of other classes 
also? This system is now in force in many promi- 
nent educational institutions and is giving such good 
results that we feel confident of its success here. 



Considerable excitement was caused at the begin- 
ning of the term by the removal of one of our canon. 
It was ordered to the Watervliet Arsenal, Troy, N. 



134 



AGGiE LIFE. 



Y., by the Chief of Ordinance. In the event of war 
with Spain, the other canon will probably be ordered 
away. These weapons of war which we have heard so 
often, may speak with more effect next time. Every 
day seems to be bringing us nearer to war. The 
diplomacy of Spain is synonomous with deception, and 
the final step must be taken very soon if it has not 
been taken by the time this reaches its readers. 
Many of the officers stationed at Military colleges 
have been ordered back to the regular army which 
will probably be used first. Some companies however 
must be kept in the West to look after the Indians. 
As Lieutenant Wright's command is now stationed at 
Fort Keogh, Montana, in the midst of restless Indians, 
there is a possibility that he may not be ordered away. 
Such we hope will be the case as we shall be sorry to 
lose our genial Lieutenant. 



NATURE'S SOLITUDES. 

APRIL fool's day IN THE WOODS. 

By the first of April most likely the snow has quite 
disappeared from open upland and meadow, and only 
now and then on some hilly slope, or in some wooded 
gulch, can one find a patch of dirty white, hardly to be 
compared with the pure crystals that greet the eye on 
morning in mid-winter as you wake to look upon 
" a world unknown." By this time the meadows 
have taken on a tinge of green, and the buds are begin- 
ning to bestir themselves. The robin's cheery call is 
heard in the orchard, the " woods the bluebird's war- 
bles know," and the evening's stillness is broken by a 
hundred notes from some neighboring pond. The 
napkins and graveclothes are being laid aside, and the 
many signs of nature's resurrection admonish her 
lovers to seek the woods and fields for one last look 
before she drops her black and seared garments of the 
winter. 

One seldom returns from a trip to the woods with- 
out having had some pleasant experience. Every 
season has its several and distinct charms. Go out 
some crisp morning in December after a snowfall. 
What makes a more beautiful picture than the pend- 
ant branches of some aged hemlock, whose boughs 
are figuratively and literally " with snows encum- 
bered;" or some sequoia of the pines covered with a 
mantle of snow ? 



The memories that are brought to mind, when cov- 
ering familiar ground, form one of the pleasantest 
phases of a woodland walk, especially in winter. To 
the beauty of the naked trees and the glistening man- 
tle of snow is added a pleasant recollection of days 
now gone by. 
" Beneath the bare boughs, I wander in bleak thought, 

RecalHng dear felicities now lost, 
When lo ! all round, in snow white splendor sought. 

The phantoms of last year's flowers loom 'mid the frost." 

Although the last few days of winter and the open- 
ing days of spring might seem to some to afford but 
little of interest to a nature lover, yet he is always sure 
of the company of a band of crows, a flock of jaj's, 
and that ever present companion of the frequenter of 
the woods, the tiny chickadee ; nor is it improbable 
that he may spend a pleasant hour watching the gam- 
bols of a " grey " and he is almost sure to meet with 
scores of " reds " and chipmunks He will be amused 
in observing the antics of a downy woodpecker, which, 
beating his tattoo upon a chestnut limb, has drawn his 
attention. In the deeper woods he may run across an 
owl and can spend a few moments in the study of this 
strange creature. Leaving the wise-acre of the woods 
to his own deep thoughts, he rambles on, and as he 
approaches a clearing, a hawk floats gracefully away 
from the top of a large tree at the edge of the woods. 
Crossing the clearing he accidentally knocks the bark 
from an old stump and a mass of fine splinters fall at 
his feet. Stooping to examine, he finds on the 
uncovered stump, among the crevices and holes, an 
entomologist's bonanza. 

And so the day passes and is soon gone. He 
makes his way homeward, satisfied that the day has 
been well and profitably spent, and feeling with the 
poet that 

"There is a pleasure in the pathless woods. 
There is a rapture on the lonely shore. 
There is society, where none intrudes. 
By the deep sea, and music in its roar ; 
I love not Man the less, but Nature more." 

Everett. 



APRIL FLOWERS. 

The following is a list of the more common plants 

which may be found in blossom during the month of 

April, growing wild in Amherst and vicinity. They 

are arranged in about the order of their time of bloom- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



135 



ing, although In some cases where two or more species 

of the same family occur at about the same time they 

are placed together in the list even though it may not 

be their relative position as to time of blossoming. 

Following the names of the more uncommon species 

is given briefly the locality in which they may be found • 

Symplocarpus foetidus Salisb. Skunks cabbage. 

Corylus Americana Walt. Hazel nut. 

Alnus incarnata Willd. Speckled alder. 

Alnus serrulata Willd, Smooth alder. 

Ulmus Americana L. Elm. 

Ulmus fulva Mich. Slippery elm. Plum Tree swamp. 

Populus tremuloides Mich. Poplar. 

Populus grandidentata Mich. Large-leaved poplar. 

Acer rubrum L. Red Maple. 

Salix nigra marsh. Black willow. 

Salix lucida Muhl. Shining willow. 

Salix alba L. var Vitellina Koch. White willow, East 

of nursery. 
Salix discolor Muhl. Glaucous willow. 
Epigea repens L. May flower. 
Hepatica triloba Chaix. Hepatica. 
Houstonia caerulea L. Innocence. 
Stellaria media Smith. Chickweed. 
Capsella Bursa-pastoris Moeuch. Shepherd's purse, 
Carex Pennsylvanca Lam. Sedge. 
Lindera benzoin Blume. Spice-bush. Lover's Lane. 
Sanguinaria Canadensis L. Blood-root. Mt. Toby. 
Antennaria plantaginifolia Hook. Everlasting. 
Saxifraga Virginiensis Michx. Early Saxifrage. 
Anemone nemorosa L. Anemone. 
Myrica Gale L. Sweet Gale. 
Dirca palustris L. Leather wood. Lover's Lane. 
Erythronium Americanum Ker. Dog's tooth violet. 
Caltha palustris G. Cowslip. 
Viola rotundifolia Mich, Yellow violet. Ravine north 

of College. 
Ostrya Virginica Willd. Hop horn beam. 
Carpinus Caroliniana Walter. Iron wood. 
Trillium erectum L. Wake Robin. 



FARMING IN GERMANY. 

(Continued.) 

As regards the size of the individual holdings we 
find the widest extremes in Germany. On the one 
hand the farms of the wealthy land owners are of 
very large size, while on the other hand we find many 



very small peasant holdings. In the first class are 
many farms of two thousand acres or more, and here 
we find farm machinery much employed ; while in the 
latter class are many farms so small and so much cut 
up into little separated lots that the work must be 
almost entirely performed by hand. To illustrate the 
latter condition I give the facts as they exist in one 
small farming town. The total farm area is 1225 
acres; the number of farmers 130. The farming 
land is divided into 561 1 separate lots, averaging less 
than one quarter of an acre each. On the average 
each farmer must look for his ten acre farm in 43 
separate pieces. These pieces are not as a rule ad- 
joining. They, on the contrary, are often widely sepa- 
rated, and to some of them the farmer may not have 
even the right of way. Such a state of affairs is the 
result of the operation of the laws governing inherit- 
ance of property and the unlimited right of sale and 
purchase in a community where there is a keen de- 
mand for land. 

In many farming communities where such condi- 
tions formerly existed the land by majority vote of the 
owners (weight of vote depending upon number of 
acres owned) has been put into the hands of a spec- 
ially appointed Government Commission and reas- 
signed as equitably as possible, each farmer agreeing 
to accept the allotment made to him ; and as a result 
of the redivision receiving his farm in one undivided 
lot. This work which has now covered a considerable 
part of the empire will make the conditions of peasant 
farm life much more favorable than they formerly 
were ; but the holdings will still be small and extensive 
use of machinery will not be possible. 

The peasant farmers of Germany in most parts of 
the empire live in villages in which the houses and 
barns, which are of brick and very small as a rule, 
stand close together. The fields are without fences 
and often stretch away for miles without a fence in 
sight. They are divided only by roads along many of 
which fruit trees are planted. The main roads be- 
tween the large towns are either paved or Macadam 
and enormous loads are hauled over them. The 
standard load for a pair of horses is about 7000 
pounds. The secondary or farm roads on the other 
hand are often very poor, hardly better than our poor- 
est country roads. All our common tree fruits except 
the peach are grown on the road side trees which as 



136 



aGGiK JLIFK. 



a rule are well cared for. The fruit belongs to the 
adjacent land owners and the ownership appears to be 
almost invariably respected. Even the small boy has 
a wholesome respect for the penalties of the law and 
the probability of being caugl^t should he take fruit 
from the trees, for the policeman or watchman is 
almost omnipresent. 

Among peasant farmers all the members of the 
family work in the field. The school vacations are 
so timed that the children may help at those seasons 
when their work is most needed. These peasants are 
fairly educated and intelligent. Intoxication is rare. 
They are industrious, frugal and honest. Indeed these 
characteristics are prominent among the German 
people as a whole. An extreme of industry is repre- 
sented by the women whom the writer has seen walk- 
ing on their way home from a hard day"s work in the 
field or at market carrying upon the back a moderately 
loaded basket and knitting as they walked. 

No kind of farm work seems to be too heavy or too 
unclean for these peasant women. They load and 
spread manure, and plant, hoe and harvest all kinds 
of farm crops. They do much of the marketing, 
sometimes hauling, or even carrying the produce to 
market as well as selling it. The public markets held 
in almost all large German towns two or three days 
in every week, winter as well as summer, and man- 
aged by the peasant women each with her wares 
occupying a definite area on the pavement in the 
square in the open air is one of the most interesting 
sights to be seen in Germany. These women are as 
a rule sturdy and healthy in appearance. They are 
good mothers and good housekeepers and generally 
appear contented and happy. 

The food of people of this class as well as of the 
laborers in general is coarse and plain. They eat but 
little meat, and that only of the cheapest kinds. The 
great staple is rye bread, though potatoes, cabbages 
and other vegetables are largely used. They seldom 
eat fruit ; they may raise it, but it is too high in price 
for them to make much use of it at home. Their 
homes, as has been stated are small ; they are also 
dark and damp and cheerless in appearance. One 
wonders how these people can be so sound in body 
and mind and so contented and happy as they are 
under existing conditions. The explanation is un- 
doubtedly found in the facts that they have never 



known anything better, and that on the whole their 
condition in late years has been improving. They 
constitute a splendid foundation for the national life. 

(to be continued.) 



CONSTITUTION OF THE HONOR SYSTEM AS 

ADOPTED BY THE CLASS OF '99 OF 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE. 

ARTICLE I. 

Section I. Each student must, in order to make 
his examination valid, sign the following declaration : 
" I have neither given nor received aid in this exam- 
ination." 

Sec. II. Fraud'in examination shall consist in any 
attempt to receive assistance from written or printed 
aids, or from any person or paper ; or any attempt to 
gain assistance whether the one so doing has com- 
pleted his paper or not. This rule shall hold within 
and without the examination room during the entire 
time in which the examination is in progress, that is 
until the time specified has expired. 

ARTICLE II. 

Sec. I. The instructor may be present in the ex- 
amination room at his option. 

Sec. II. The time assigned for examination shall 
not exceed three hours. The nature of the paper is 
to be adjusted to the time alloted. 

Sec. III. During the examination each student 
shall have perfect freedom of action and conversation, 
provided he does not annoy or interfere with the work 
of others. 

ARTICLE III. 

Sec. I. There shall be a committee of six (6) 
members who shall represent the class and deal with 
all cases involving violation of the honor system. 

Sec. II. The members of this committee are to 
be elected at a special election to be held by the class 
of '99 during the week beginning with the second 
Thursday of the spring term of 1898, to serve for that 
term. 

Sec. III. The chairman of this committee shall be 
chosen by the committee. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Sec. I. In case of frauds reported by a member 
or members of the class or by their instructor in ex- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



137 



aminations, the committee shall summon the accused 
person or persons, and witnesses, and shall conduct a 
formal investigation, publicly or secretly, at the option 
of the accused. In case of conviction the committee 
shall recommend to the faculty that the guilty student 
be dismissed from college. 

Sec. II. Four votes of the committee shall in all 
cases be necessary for conviction, All members of 
the committee must be present at the trial. 

ARTICLE V. 

Sec. I. Each member of the class is expected to 
report any fraud in examination to the committee of 
six and shall be expected to lend his aid in maintain- 
» ing this constitution. 

ARTICLE VI. 

Sec. I. This constitution shall take effect upon 
the opening of the spring term of 1898. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Sec. I. This constitution may be amended 
(f) three quarters vote of the class. 

In accordance with this constitution, the following 
committee has been chosen by the class : 

Melvin H. Pingr.ee, chairman, 

Frederick H. Turner, 

Dan A. Beaman, 

William E. Chapin, 

Bernard H. Smith, 

W. Elmer Hinds. 



THROUGH THE SPECTATOR'S GLUSSES. 

Some few years ago, when this country was in the 
midst of serious diplomatic correspondence with its 
parent stock, there arose a species of the genus homo, 
called " jingoist. " This term, however inaptly 
applied, has become a fixture in our language ; 
scholars may strive to suppress it ; the sages may 
deplore its plebean nature, but the common people 
at large have adopted it, and it has evidently come to 
stay. Edward Everett spent his best efforts in derid- 
ing " annexation, " nor could his influence, learned as 
it was, substitute for the longer word that which is 
both shorter and more euphoneous, " annexion. " 

The meaning of "jingoist " is not clear, but from 
this root we have already received, "jingoistic, " and 
"jingo," (" perhaps a poor contraction of jingois. ") 



A jingo, and here the spectator avails himself of the 
shorter word, is one who is ever ready to uphold his 
country at the expense of all others, . who is loud 
mouthed in his wild denunciation of his opponents, and 
whose patriotism is to be measured by popular applause, 
too often misdirected, or by the financial stress in 
which he finds himself placed. 

But jingoism is not limited to the narrower fields of 
political life, it is almost as wide as life itself. The 
inborn human desire to better itself at the expense of 
others is, perhaps, this virulent disease in its incipient 
form. All ranks in life seem to be infected, and little 
is known about its cure. That it is a mental derange- 
ment most doctors allow. It seems to be an abnormal 
development of self egotism, which like the measles 
is sure to come and like the measles, must run its 
own course. 

There appears to be one consoling feature of the 
disease, and that is, if the patient be allowed to pursue 
his course unrestricted, he will surely hang himself 
before many moons. The American people as a 
whole are forbearing and conservative ; they have a 
sober second thought that is bound to come to the 
front and aid them in the just solution of any perplex- 
ing problem. 

It is especially sad, and in this the Spectator believes 
that he has many sympathizers, that jingoism should 
ever appear in college life ; but it does appear and it 
must be squarely met. There is as much class 
jingoism as there is national jingoism, and sometimes 
it is far more repulsive. 

There may be some small excuse, when in the 
heat of a grave debate some western fire-eater will 
laden the halls of Congress with sulphurous fumes 
that are said to play the part of rhetoric, but there 
seems to be no "'raison d'etre " for its appearance in 
those walks in life where all is supposed to be quiet 
and calm. 

The Spectator recollects walking through the 
cloister of a foreign convent, a part where visitors 
were allowed to be received ; all was calm and 
untroubled ; no petty annoyances disturbed the still 
air of a mid-summer day. Life there seems one 
peaceful repose of unremitting learning and devotion. 
The heterogeneous elements of the city were as far 
distant as the white-capped Alpine mountains. There, 
certainly, was a place to dream and work, to plan 



^38 



AGGIE LIFE. 



grand achievements and to realize them. The unity 
of the life and environment could not but impress the 
visitor favorably. 

It is so often a lack of suitable environment that 
breeds jingoism, that it would seem as if the root of 
this disease might be dealt its death blow at this point. 
Jingoism is the offspring of unnatural circumstances 
and abnormal ambitions ; given the one, the other 
most surely follows. It is reprehensible because, like 
insanity, those most fully convinced that they have it 
not, are really foully steeped in its meshes. A jingoist 
could never be made to understand that he is not a 
statesman, any more than an insanity patient could be 
assured that he was not sane. 

The particular phase of this malady that evinces 
itself in college life often takes the most ridiculous 
disguises for a subterfuge. Guises that would hardly 
deceive the merest infant were he cognizant of the 
status of the case. And because it is so thinly clothed 
in garments of seeming wisdom, its victims feel them- 
selves safe. 

College morale is a subject so broad and admits of 
such a variety of treatments, that the spectator feels 
utterly incapable of stating any opinion upon its con- 
struction and application. Each locality seems to call 
for a different mode of treatment. That there should 
be a morale is beyond doubt, but how it should be 
cultivated is a serious question for consideration. 

' Schemes have been originated and put into execu- 
tion which have somehow failed in their purpose and 
we are, to-day, no better for having them. The 
Spectator believes that you cannot get a morale 
except from the men themselves. No law makes it ; 
it must come spontaneously from the heart and it 
must be genuine, 

You may have reunions ; you may have sociable 
gatherings; you may have athletic contests; all are good 
in their way. but you have to go deeper into the soul 
of man to get at those traits that will destroy all 
jingoism. There seems to be a lamentable lack of 
breadth of character where jingoism becomes 
implanted. 

The unity of the whole is what should be striven for ; 
not the unity of the parts. No incongruous elements 
should be admitted as they destroy the equilibrium 
and unbalance the environment by their mere associa- 
tions. That personal factor which plays so strong a 



part in our daily works and intercourses, should be 
studiously cultivated that it may make a harmonious 
part of one grand whole. 

Little can be gained for civilization while men hold 
crabbed views of their own existence and that of their 
neighbors. Widening of all our faculties is sure death 
to jingoism in all its forms, and promotes our own 
happiness in the same ratio as the increasing good 
we do the world at large. To the student body much 
has been said, in praise or blame ; the heavy responsi- 
bility resting upon those young men is so often under- 
estimated and belittled, but in their hands rests the 
reputation of their native land. They should each 
and all be men ; men, in that broader and more beau- 
tiful sense ; men to whom tolerance is the greatest of 
the virtues, by whom honor is well prized, and who in 
hours of trials or of sports, will bear their fair share 
of victory and defeat with that grace which surely 
betokens the finer sensibilities. 

The Spectator. 



—Base Ball ! 

— What make wheel do you ride ? 

— Wright of the junior class has left College. 

— Prof. H. Babson and wife spent the spring vaca- 
tion in Washington, D. C. 

— Rev. Mr. Newton of Belchertown preached in 
the College chapel last Sunday. 

— Prof. S. T. Maynard has been re-elected to 
serve on the Amherst school committee. 

— The Boston University Year- Book has recently 
been issued, twelve pages of which are devoted to the 
M. A. C. 

— Paul, Leslie, Hemenway, Gordon, Rice and 
Gamwell, of the freshman class are rooming at H. M. 
Thompson's. 

— W. P. Cutter, librarian of the Agricultural de- 
partment at Washington. D. C, recently visited the 
College library. 

— Prof. S. T. Maynard addressed the Amherst 
Grange Tuesday evening on the subject " What shall 
we do Arbor-day? " 



AGGIE JLIFE,. 



139 



— Tuesday being Patriot's Day no exercises were 
held at the College. The holiday commemorates the 
Battle of Lexington. 

— Members of the faculty have received Invitations 
to be present at the flag day exercises held at Boston 
university this month. 

— B. H. Smith '99 has been elected to the Aggie 
Life board to fill the vacancy made by the resigna- 
tion of E. M. Wright. 

— The average rank of the whole class taking the 
short winter course was 88.5. This is a standard for 
all classes to strive for. 

— Brooks and Gamwell '01 were not able to return to 
College at the opening of the term, being kept at 
home on account of illness. 

— Dr. Charles S. Walker has lately published a 
paper entitled " The Problem of the Currency " in the 
April number of the " Bibliotheka Sacra." 

— Extended order drill here commenced this week, 
and it would greatly facilitate matters if the students 
would study the Drill Regulations on this point. 

— The College Shakespearean club held an informal 
reception in their club-rooms Friday evening, April 
first. Many friends and alumni were present. 

— W. E. Hinds '99 has been in Springfield, attend- 
ing the annual meeting of the presidents of college 
Y. M. C. A's. and reports a large delegation present 

— Dr. William P. Brooks has recently published 
his thesis in German. It is a treatise on fertilizers 
and is the result of three years of hard work and 
study. 

— Base ball practice has commenced on the cam- 
pus and the candidates are working hard. All out ! 
Show your college spirit and support the College 
nine. 

— The second regiment of Infantry stationed at 
Fort Keogh, Montana, has been ordered to Mobile. 
Lieut. Wright of that regiment is daily expecting to be 
recall id to join the troop. 

— Dr. Charles S. Walker represented the College 
at the annual meeting of the American Academy of 
Polit'.cal and Social Science held in Philadelphia on 
April 1 1 . While there he was elected a member of 
the council of the Academy. 



— The authorities at Washington recently tele- 
graphed for the removal of one of the field-pieces in 
use at the College. The gun has been forwarded to 
the arsenal at Troy, N. Y. 

— The class of '99 planted their class tree at an 
early hour Friday morning. The tree is a fine elm 
and stands on the campus near the corner of South 
College. " The early bird, etc." 

■ — H. E. Maynard '99 has been elected to represent 
the College on the Union Lecture course committee. 
Hereafter both Amherst College and M. A. C. will 
have representatives on this board. 

— The following men of the senior class have been 
selected to speak at Commencement : A. G. Adje- 
mian, G. N. Baxter, Alex Montgomery, J. P. Nicker- 
son, R. D. Warden and G. H. Wright. 

— The faculty has accepted the plan for the honor 
system as presented by the junior class. It will go 
into effect this term and after seeing the beneficial 
effect it has it is to be hoped that other classes will 
follow the precedent established. 

— There will be a lecture in the Town Hall this 
evening by Principal Falconer of the Amherst High 
School. His subject " Through Scotland with Rob- 
bie Burns as a leader." His lecture will be espec- 
ially interesting to those interested in literature. 

— The junior class has elected the following offi- 
cers : Pres't B. H. Smith; Vice-pres't, W. A. 
Hooker; Sec'y, H.W.Dana; Treas., H.E.Maynard ; 
Class- capt., D. A. Beaman ; Searg't-at-arms, F. H. 
Turner. Tennis directors, C. M. Walker, H. E. 
Maynard. 

— An invitation has been extended to the batallion, 
for a prize drill to take place in Boston between 
Brown, M. A. C, and the Institute of Technology. As 
there is some danger of the recall of Capt. Bigelow 
of M I. T. the invitation has been laid over until some 
future date. 

— At the last meeting of the Amherst Grange, G. 
R. Bridgeforth '01 gave a talk on the " Agriculture of 
the South," A. G. Adjemian '98 described the " Agri- 
culture of Armenia " and Chujiro Kochia. a post- 
graduate student spoke of " Japanese Agriculture." 
The subject of the meeting was " The Agriculture of 
other Lands," and the speakers were listened to with 
great interest, 



140 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The Boarding club has elected the following 
officers : President and manager, J. S. Eaton ; vice- 
pres't, M. H. Pingree ; sec'y and treas., J. P. Nick- 
erson ; 4th director, B. H. Snnith ; 5th director, 
Brown '00 ; 6th director, W. R. Crowell ; 7th direc- 
tor, Gamwell '01. 

— Work has been commenced on the cleaning and 
decorating of the small ravine southwest of the resi- 
dence of Prof. Brooks. Many trees and shrubs will 
be transplanted and walks laid out along the ravine 
and every thing done to make it an attractive spot on 
the plant-house grounds. 

— F. H. Turner '99 has been elected assistant man- 
ager of the base ball association. It is understood that 
the assistant manager will be manager the following 
year. This is a new office and was made with the 
purpose of giving the manager an opportunity to 
become more familiar with his work. 

— The senior class has elected the following offi- 
cers : Prest't, A, Montgomery; Vice-pres't, J, P. 
Nickerson; Sec'y and Treas., S. W. Wiley; Supper 
committee, J. S, Eaton, R. D. Warden ; Committee 
on printing, R. D. Warden, J. P. Nickerson ; Ivy 
committee, G. H. Wright, C. G. Clark. 

— The Flint prize speakers, to represent the junior 
class at Commencement have been selected by Prof. 
Mills. The six are D. A. Beaman, W. E. Hinds, H. 
E. Maynard, B. H. Smith, F. H. Turner and C. M. 
Walker. The speakers are selected for their pro- 
ficiency in the English department during their course. 

— Three prizes were offered last term to the mem- 
bers of the short winter course for general excellence 
during the course. The prizes have been awarded as 
follows : A first prize of $50 to W. T. Packard of 
Campello, Mass. ; A second prize of $30 to 0. H. 
Leach of Florence and a third prize of $20 to J. E. 
Holt. 

— It was recently voted in faculty meeting, that 
the president announce to the senior class, that should 
any member in response to the call of duty, enlist in 
the army or navy of the U.S., upon his return from 
service, the faculty would reccommend to the trustees 
that they confer upon him the degree received by his 
classmates. 

— The Freshmen have already begun baseball 
practice. Capt. Ahearn called the men out early last 



week and nearly every morning they are seen on the 
campus. There seems to be plenty of good material 
and the varsity will probably draw on it for two or three 
men. Among the most promising men are Ahearn, 
Paul, Graves, Barry, Dorman, Rice, Rogers, Macom- 
ber, Gordon and Cook. 

— The College catalogue has just been issued and 
the students should make it a point to send copies of 
this volume to all those interested in the College. 
An important feature of the book is a very valuable 
paper on •' The Pterophoridae of North America," by 
Prof. C. H. Fernald, Ph. D. This paper shows a 
great deal of study and contains some very fine draw- 
ings, prepared by R. A. Cooley. 

— At the last meeting of the Pomona Grange held 
at Belchertown April 7 different members of the fac- 
ulty addressed a large audience. Dr. Charles Well- 
ington spoke very enthusiastically of the work of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College and it was dis- 
cussed whether a man could learn more about practi- 
cal farming at M. A. C. than on a farm. Dr. W. P. 
Brooks conducted a round table of which the disposal 
of farm products was the chief topic. At the close of 
the meeting there seemed to be abetter understanding 
of the work of the College by the farmers of the state 
than ever before. 

— Tennis enthusiasm has already sprung up. Two 
of the courts are in excellent condition and the third 
is nearly so. There is very little time during the day 
to work upon them and most of the work was done 
between sunrise and breakfast. They were raked, 
levelled, and thoroughly rolled so that now they pre- 
sent a fine smooth surface. With such courts and 
such enthusiasm there should and probably will be 
held this spring, a grand tournament. It might also 
be well to have competitions in both singles and 
doubles between the different classes, thus keeping up 
the class spirit and perhaps developing a team which 
could represent the college against other institutions. 

— The ten men who are to represent the orstorical 
department of freshmen English at the annual j'peak- 
ing before a committee from the faculty, havt- been 
chosen and announced by Prof. Babson, the head of 
that department. The class seems well pleased with 
the selection, for, indeed, they had a har.d in 
the selecting themselves. From these ten, four will 



AGGIE LIFE. 



141 



be chosen to speak on the commencement stage, and 
from present appearances there will be a lively com- 
petition, for all are interested in the work and all 
express their determination to work hard for a place 
on the four. This department is steadily growing and 
is soon to become one of the most important factors 
in the freshman year of our college life, for it not only 
gives a man grace and ease while speaking in public, 
but it also gives him confidence in his powers and in 
himself. The names of the ten are as follows : John 
C. Barry of Amherst ; George R. Bridgeforth of West- 
moreland, Ala.; W. C. Dickerman of Taunton ; Alli- 
son R. Dorman of Springfield ; Clarence E. Gordon 
of Clinton ; Thaddeus Craves, Jr. of Hatfield ; Francis 
E. Hemmenway of Barre ; Harry J. Moulton of Mil- 
ford ; Charles L. Rice of Pittsfield ; Alexander C. 
Wilson of Amherst. 

— On the evening of Mar. 17 there was held in the 
boarding-club house a German Schlusskneipe. It 
was one of those gatherings that help to bind the stu- 
dents and faculty closer together. Fully a hundred stu- 
dents, alumni and faculty sat round the board, arranged 
after the fashion of the banquet table. Nearly all the 
members of the faculty present were called upon by 
the different classes — the toastmaster calling upon no 
one — to speak, and all responded, mostly with those 
stories appropriate to the occasion. Dr. Charles 
Wellington acted as toastmaster and his speech, inter- 
sliced with humorous stories, was well received. W. 
H. Armstrong '99 then furnished some excellent 
music on the zither and the speaking by the professors 
followed. Among those called upon were Dr. Lind- 
sey, Prof. Cooley. Prof. Brooks, Dr. Walker, Prof. 
Ostrander, J. E. Gifford '94, D. A. Beaman '99, and 
A. Adjemian '98. The principal theme of the speak- 
ing seemed to be " How can we help the col- 
lege along the lines of bringing new students here and 
doing what we can to get more modern buildings?" 
One of the ideas suggested was a hotel on the grounds 
where students and visitors can get their meals at 
a low cost. Several methods for getting new students 
were suggested and Dr. Walker spoke on our relations 
to Boston University. After Stanley brothers had 
rendered several fine selections on the banjo the 
gathering broke up by singing " Here's to Aggie Col- 
lege," and as the doors were opened the college yell 
rang out into the night air. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Report of the ''Maine'' Court of Inquiry. A book 
on this subject would naturally be of great interest. . 
It contains, besides all the information relative to the 
inquiry, a large number of half-tones of the battleship 
" Maine " as it appeared both before and after the 
explosion. A remarkable fact in connection with this 
report (of over 300 pages) is that it was printed in 
less than 18 hours. This is considered to be the 
quickest work of this sort on record. Library number 
973-106. 

A Library of the World's Best Literature. The 
University Edition of this valuable work has been 
very lately added to the library. It is edited by 
Charles Dudley Warner, assisted by an able advisory 
council. The complete set consists of forty-five vol- 
umes of which thirty have already been published. The 
aim of the editors of this work has been to offer to 
the public a review of the works of all the noted 
writers down to our own time, not only a sketch of 
their lives but also selections from their best works. 
The University edition — limited to one thousand 
copies — has a much better binding and offers many 
more Illustrations than the other editions. There are 
many colored-plate fac-similes from all books, such as, 
The Gutenberg Bible, the first book printed with mov- 
able types ; the title page of '• Euphues " by John 
Lily ; ancient Irish minature " David and his Cour- 
tiers ; papyrus of Sermons of Augustine ; the Zend- 
Avesta ; the oldest Lombardic Manuscript in exist- 
ence and many others. Library number 820-62.' 

Heart Throbs of Authors. This book has been 
compiled by Wm. Hardcastle Browne with the inten- 
tion of bringing out the finest sentiments of the great 
authors on the subjects of Youth, Beauty, Love, Mar- 
riage, Man, Woman, Age and Death. It has been 
his object to collect original ideas told in plain forcible 
language, rather than in any beauty of expression. 
Library number 829-15. 

The following books have also come into our college 
library : 
The Gases of the Atmosphere, by William Ramsay, 

L. N. 533-9. 
Speech of John Hay, L. N. 825-33. 
Elementary Zoology, by Chapin C. Reltyer L. N. 

590-113 
Elements of Electro Chemistry, by Dr. R. Liipke, L. 

N. 540-105. 
Textbook of Physical Chemistry, Speyers L. N. 540- 
104. 



142 



AGGIE LIFE, 



vamni. 



The alumni editor wishes to remind all alumni and 
former students of Old Aggie of the importance of 
sending their latest addresses to President Goodell, 
or to the Life editor. 

71. — William D. Russell, Auditor International 
Paper Co., nineteen corporations in New England and 
the state of New York. Address, New York City. 

72. — It is with deep regret that we learn of the 
serious illness of Dr. J. C. Cutter. 

73. — James H. Webb has given twenty dollars to 
the library to be expended in books of which there is 
the greatest need. 

'86. — Winfield Ayres, married July 15, 1896 at 
New York to Miss Lucie L. Prudhomme of Louisiana. 
Present address, No. 112 W. 94th St., New York 
City, 

78. — Amos L. Spofford, Farmer, Georgetown, 
Mass. 

'90. — F. J. Smith, chemist of the Gypsy Moth 
commission returned to Maiden Monday for the 
summer. Mr. Smith will commence at once on field 
experimental work. 

'94. — F. G. Averell, has resigned his agency for 
the New York Mutual Life Insurance Co. to accept a 
position with Stone & Downer Co., Custom House 
Brokers, Boston, Mass. Address, Room 204 
Exchange Bldg., 53 State street. 

'94._Charles H. Higgins D. V. S. McGill Univer- 
sity '97, veterinary Physician and Surgeon, is practic- 
ing in Fitchburg, Mass. 

'94. — John E. Gifford, Supt. of the Stockwell Farm 
at Sutton, Mass. spent the last week of last term at 
the college looking up the methods of the dairy plant. 

'94. — A. H. Kirkland, Assistant State Entomotogist 
was in town last week, in the interests of the Gypsy 
Moth Commission. 

'94. — Dr. Claude F. Walker of Yale University 
has been at his home for a few days. 

'95. — D. C. Potter, in charge of the Neuremberga 
Park, at Auburndale, Mass. 

'95. — Born at the " Rocks Farm " Littleton, N. 
H., a daughter, Frances Mildred, to Maurice J. 
Sullivan. 



'95. — G. A. Billings has been at his home from St. 
Louis attending the funeral services of his mother. 
Also visited friends at Amherst. 

'95. — Mr. R. A. Cooley has a paper in the Canadian 
Entomologist for April, with the descriptions of several 
new species of scale insects belonging to the Genus 
Chionaspis. This paper is the second of a series of 
preliminaries to a monograph of the genus upon which 
Mr. Cooley is making an extended study. 

'95.- — To the effort of H. D. Hemenway belongs 
the credit of a successful sword drill, recently given 
by the young ladies of the Methodist church. 

'96. — Announcement is made of the engagement 
of Harry H. Roper to Miss Mabel F. Gleason of 
Hubbardston, Mass. 

'96. — H. C. Burrington has accepted the position 
as manager of the Farm Department of the Clarksburg 
company. North Adams, Mass. 

'96. — F. H. Read has resigned his position in the 
New York Business Insiitute to become a member of 
tlie firm of Dolson & Read, publishers and advertisers 
with headquarters in New York City, also spent part 
of the college recess in town. 

'96. — B. K. Jones was recently reminded of his 
birthday by the young people of the Baptist church, 
who presented him with a handsome dress suit case 
and silver mounted clothes brush. Mr. Jones has 
been active in church work, now holding the position 
of Supt. of Sunday school. 

'96. — H. H. Roper was visited by his sister from 
Barre during the spring recess. 

'96. — The engagement is announced of H. C. 
Burrington to Miss Lulu G. Rice of Greenfield, Mass. 

'96. — C. A. Nutting and A. B. Cook have recently 
paid flying visits to friends in town. 

Ex-'97.^ — F. W. Barclay, Supt. of the estate of 
F. L. Griscom.be, Haverford, Pa., spent April 3 visit- 
ing his classmates at Amherst, 

'97. — J. M. Barry has returned, having completed 
his extensive landscape work in Florida. 

'97. — L.L.Cheney, 3471 Sampson St. Philadelphia, 
Pa., University of Penn. Veterinary College. 

'97. — J. A. Emrich has accepted a position in the 
central Post Office at Chicopee, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



143 



'97. — J. L. Bartlett has accepted a position in the 
weather Bureau, Savannah, Ga. 

•97._p. H.Smith Jr., Waterbury, Vt. Address 
care of W. C.Towne. With the Waterbury Creamery. 

'97. — G. D. Leavens has resigned his position as 
chemist at the Hatch Experiment Station under Dr. 
C. A. Goessmann and has purchased the " Sybil 
Farm " in Grafton. Mr. Leavens has made elaborate 
plans for conducting a large dairy farm on strictly 
scientific principles. He will also pay some atten- 
tion to production of fancy fruit. Address Box 121 
Grafton, Mass. 

Ex-'98. — H. R. Wolcott spent a few days of the 
spring vacation in to>vn visiting friends. 

Ex-'99. — C. C.Dickinson is taking a course in teleg- 
raphy at the Polytechnic Institute at Lebanon. Pa. 



E^chan;^es- 



As usual The Holy Cross Purple is of interest. 
Much evidence of literary skill is shown. 

Forest Echoes in the Phi Rhonian certainly deserves 
mentioning. 

That there is true wit in the Epsilon under the title 
" Sparks " we are only too glad to acknowledge. 

Big Eater — " We are to have a boat ride at re- 
duced rates," 

Star Boarder — " Then you are going to have a 
bargain sail." — Epsilon. 

Teacher — " Doesn't tobacco affect the brain?" 
1901 — " I don't know, don't use it." 
Teacher — "What, tobacco ?" 
1001 — " No, the brain." — Epsilon. 

A woman's ways are very queer, 

And win her much renown ; 
She'll call a man up at the 'phone, 

Then turn and call him down. 

— Brunonian. 



w. "w: B®T] 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



A. J. XVIORaAN, 

Practical Horseshoer, 

Rear of Purity Bakery, 
AMHERST, MASS. 
g^=="Best of work guaranteed. 



(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 

All kinds of 

HEATING, mmWi AND QAS WORKS. 

HUNT'S BLOCK, AMHERST. 



RiVBB Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



T7f£ mNO 0rWNfEl5l% ' 
T/f£ /DEAL MOmi',^;^^ I 

\\^Hi^ CONSTRiiCTION 






A^ECHANI5/^, 



REPRESENTATION. 

6ATI5FAtTI0h: 






144 



AGGIE LIFE. 




Trade Marks 

Designs 

Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free ■whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific Jlinericdm 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific .lournal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, fL Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN iCo.36^Broadway, [Jew York 

Branch Office. 625 F St., Washington, D. C. 



'Cm' Consider— if you can keep the wet out ;1 
'!'f of your rifle it will not r«sinor/7-ee^e. Only -y 

"".arlin Repeaters I 



have Solid Tops, shedding water like a 
duck's back. Our 197-page book (just out) 
tells all about them. Up-to-date infor- 
mation alioiit po\vders,black and smoke- 
less; proper sizes, quantities, how to 
load; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, 
jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom, etc.: 
trajectories, velocities, penetrations. AU 
calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and 
1,000 other things, including m?,ny trade 
•~ V /_j secrets never before given to the public. 
^y|^ J'^j-ee if you will send stamps for postage to 
m'^ T!ic Marlia Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



fei 



^l^/^^^J^l^f'S^-^'-'-i-iSC^^^^f^i^l^^^i'f^kM^ 



H5 



C. 8. GA^BS, D. D. S. 

E. :n^. bkowk, d. d. s. 



DENTIS 

Cutler's Block, . . . - 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrons Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



LEMUEL SEARS & CO,, 

Wliolesaie aqu Retail Grocers, 

. 20 and 22 DWIGHT STREET, 
28 RACE STREET, 



IiEMTTEL SEAK8. 

Henry G. Sears. 



HOLYOKE, MASS. 




(Dassaehiisetts flgpieultupal College. 

AT THE 

OOLX.ISGE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

MM Hordes and Soutloi Slisep 



And we beg to annouuce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



R. F. Kelton. 



D. B, Kelton. 



•) 



DEALERS rSf 



Fresh and Salt Meats, 



POOLTRY, YESETHBLES, FISH JP OYSTERS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



146 



E. B. SICKINSDN, H. n. B. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

9 TO 12 -A.- IVC., 1-30 TO 6 F. ]i/C. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



G. M. CHAI^BE 

Liverv ai\d Feed Stable. 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE 

PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

I^TJBBEIK O-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



t^ Repairing done tvhile you tvait,.,Str 
« PHGENIX ROW. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY AND FEED STABLE 



T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

^MITT aTREJET, AMBJBRST, MASS, 



'> 



L. W. GIBBS & CO., 

James E. Stintson, Manager, 

CLOTHIERS and FURNISHERS. 

ALL THE NEW THINGS IN 

NECKWEAR, HATS AND CAPS, 

GOLF SUITS, &c. 



Cook's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOgK, . - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

»Co-Operati¥e Steam Laundry-* 

and Carpet Renovating Establisliment. 

Aussie A.g:eM3.t, O, M, -WSeiOHET" »»s 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

(TNBsrSA.Tisr'-A.aTioisr guja-ra-JSTTEobd. a^S==- 
Office : 
Next Dook West of Amitt St. School House. 




(Qatehmaker and Optieian. 

Prompt skillful attention given to all fine 
and complicated watchwork. 



147 



AGGIE LIFE. 



J (55 days ahead of them all. 







OLjCi^ 



HIGHEST POSSIBLE GRADE. 

Light, Noiseless and Easy Running. Least possible friction. All fitted with the 

Keating Double Roller Chain. 

$^0 and $']^. 

^^See that Cur^e/' 

COME AND LOOK THEM OVER. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



108 Maik Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Teleplione connection. 

HEADQUA RTERS FOR AQG!E STUDENTS. 

HAIR BRESBIMa ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 




i— ^X 



iiqgPQotograplier 



j^-^ 



OF WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS. 
Work Guaranteed or money refunded. Give us a trial. 



102 Main St., opp. Court House, 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE EOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, MasB. 




.« -^ 



AGENT. 



The Photographer y 

To tlie class of '97 M. A. C. MAKES A SPECIALTY 
OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fi'esh. 
AMHERST, MASS. 

E, R. BENNETT. 

Jeweler, 
Optician, 
Watchmakei . 



first door prom Post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICED. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED 



148 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Hooks, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 



AMHE RST H OUSE 

FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, 



Manager. 




We will sell you a good Stmidard Second-hand Typewriter for $2^.00. 

Write for full particulars to 

OUTTEIR TOWEIR CO., 



12 A. Milk Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Establislied 1845. Tel. 2423. 




W/r, 









STEARNS BICYCLES. 



Among the improvements for 1898 are full flush joints, internal seat post and handle (^^n 
bar post fastenings, self-oiling bearings, low frames and low crank hanger drop, nar- -'*^^ 
row tread, new style handle bars, the most perfect crank hanger mechanism in 

existence. 

Stearns Chainless $125.00 

Stearns Specials 75.00 

Stearns Yellow Fellows 50.00 

Stearns Tandems 100.00 



(a 



Write now for handsome illustrated catalogue, free on application. 



m E, C. STEARNS <& CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. ^ 




W/r, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST, MASS.. MAY 4, 1898 



NO. 12 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
th« Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

WARREN ELMER HINDS, '99, Editor-in-Chief. 

FREDERICK HARVEY TURNER, '99, Business Manager. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Ass't Business Manager. 
CHARLES MOREHOUSE WALKER, '99, College Notes. WILLIAM ANSON HOOKER, '99, Alumni. 

BERNARD HOWARD SMITH. '99, Library Notes. FREDERIC AUGUSTUS MERRILL, '00, Through the Spectators Glasses. 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS CROWELL, '00, Exchange. JAMES EDWARD HALLIGAN, '00, Athletics. 

ALLISON RICE DOxRMAN, '01. ALEXANDER CAVASSA WILSON, '01, 

Terms: fl.OO per gear in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Hinds, Pres. Athletic Association, 

Y. H. Canto, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. P. Nickerson, Sec. Reading-Room Association, 

Ninety-Nine Index, . . . . D. A. Beaman, Manager. 



J. S. Eaton, Sec. 

G. H. Wright, Manager. 

J. S. Eaton, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Cdi'torials. 



One of the imperative duties of life, it seems to us, 
is that which involves the acceptance of a responsi- 
bility placed before us and the complete fulfilling of all 
its requirements. There is too great a laxity in meet- 
ing undergraduate responsibilities, among the students 
of the college which should be corrected in some 
summary manner. Within the past few weeks the 
question of continuing one of the fundamental branches 
of study was put before a mass meeting in order to 
ascertain the college feeling upon the subject. That 
feeling was expressed by a vote so unsatisfactory that 
it was deemed best to discontinue this particular 
branch of education. The advisability of putting to a 
vote what was practically outside the consideration of 
the student, may be deemed inexpedient at the very 
least, but as such an action was made, the only alter- 
native for the undergraduate was to arise and support 
the continuance of the work in no uncertain voice. 
This was not done. Instead of meeting the moral 
responsibility face to face, there was quibbling and an 



unsatisfactory vote. Aside from the question of 
patriotism, there was that of a manly action. The 
recent past had witnessed a display of loyalty to one 
who had been called to sterner scenes ; his words of 
parting had been words of hope and encouragement, 
and yet on the following morning a vote was taken 
practically abolishing for the time being that depart- 
ment for the good of which he had striven so faithfully. 
There are those among us, few in number, who should 
have stepped into the breach and in no uncertain tone 
should have commanded, whereby .they now only fol- 
low. It is to them that we should look for strength, 
not for a quiet acquiescence in the rule of the 
minority. This department has, as its foundation 
stone, implicit obedience, otherwise it becomes a 
failure. Life regrets that the department was not 
continued under favorable circumstances and is san- 
guine enough to believe that if no word had been said, 
the senior officers would have proven themselves 
strong enough to command. Now they rest under 
the opprobrium of a lack of moral courage. We fully 
believe the chief responsibility for this failure rests 



146 



AGGIE LIFE. 



upon the inglorious shoulders of the minority who by 
voice and vote abolished a system of which we should 
be proud. A vote of confidence was asked and it was 
not obtained ; an honorable proposition was made and 
the undergraduates could not meet it in an honorable 
manner. 



Our baseball season promises to be one of success. 
So far two games have been played ; one has been 
lost, the other won. The first game with a semi- 
professional team resulted in a defeat on our own 
grounds, chiefly through the ineffective work of the 
pitcher in the last inning of the game when five runs 
were made and our lead of two runs overcome. The 
Haydenville pitcher, Sheehan, proved an enigma to 
our men in the third, fourth, fifth and sixth innings, 
though nine hits were made off him during the game. 
The second game at Saxton's River with Vermont 
Academy was won through the effective work of Hal- 
ligan and the timely and extremely heavy batting of 
our whole team. Halligan by his work in this game 
easily proves his value as a pitcher ; though unable to 
find the plate for two innings he succeeded at last in 
pulling himself together and allowed but four hits dur- 
ing the game. In the field too much praise cannot 
be given to the old players, while at right Dorman has 
so far proved himself a capable player. Our outfield 
is certainly one of the strongest seen here in years, 
not only as fielders but with the stick they are all that 
can be desired. The infield though almost without 
exception new men have already shown their ability 
as ball players, but one error having been made so far 
by the regular players in their positions. Graves who 
covered first base for the first time in the Vermont 
Academy game played remarkably well, and by virtue 
of his batting deserves a place in the makeup of the 
team. Crowell behind the bat may always be relied 
upon to play his usual strong game ; while with two 
such strong pitchers as Eaton and Halligan we have a 
corps of battery men which can always be depended 
upon. Captain Eaton has worked hard and conscien- 
tiously for the team and the results are very encourag- 
ing. A team though individually strong can never be 
relied upon to win games unless each man makes 
himself an element in the whole team work, and thus 
work together as one individual. Scientific batting, 
scientific base running and scientific team work are 



more necessary than individual records and grand- 
stand plays. If the men will but bear this in mind in 
their practice the result is sure to be seen later in the 
games, and the outlook for the season made doubly 
encouraging. 



At the eleventh annual convention of the associa- 
tion of American Agricultural Colleges and Experi- 
ment Stations, held at Minneapolis in July 1897, the 
following resolution was passed : 

Resolved, That a committe of five be appointed by 
the president to investigate, consider and, if practic- 
able, devise a plan whereby graduate students of the 
land-grant and other colleges may have access to and 
the use of the Congressional library and the collec- 
tions in tne Smithsonian Institution, the National 
Museum and the scientific bureaus of the various de- 
partments, at Washington, of the United States Gov- 
ernment, for the purposes of study and research ; said 
plan to include suggestions as to the manner in which 
such work may be organized, co-ordinated, and 
directed, to the best advantage ; the composition and 
organization of such a staff as may be necessary to 
properly co-ordinate and direct such work, and also 
an outline of such legislation as may be necessary to 
effect the general purposes of this resolution. Said 
committee to report at the next meeting of the asso- 
ciation. 

In accordance with the preceeding resolution a com- 
mittee representing the State Colleges and Universi- 
ties was appointed as follows : President C. Northrop 
of Minnesota, chairman. President H. H. Goodell of 
Massachusetts, President G. E. MacLean, of 
Nebraska, President M. A. Buckham of Vermont, 
Captain Alexis Cope of Ohio University, President J. 
H. Washburn of Rhode Island. This committee met 
last week in Washington and spent several days in 
interviewing the heads of the scientific divisions estab- 
lished by our National Government, such as the 
Geological Survey, Geodetic Survey, Weather Bureau, 
Biological Department, Division of Ornithology, 
Smithsonian Institution, Congressional Library, Com- 
missioner of Education, Fish Commission and Divi- 
sion of Botany. Everyone seen approved of the work 
and seemed very enthusiastic for the success of the 
movement. Some even said that if their men had to 
give this instruction it would make them better and 
more efficient in their own departments. The propo- 
sition is to make the regents of the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution preside over this movement and the endeavor 



AGGIE LIFE. 



147 



shall be to so co-ordinate the branches of instruction 
in the divisions that there shall be no overlapping or 
confusion. The object of the movement is to give 
our graduates an opportunity to engage in special 
work at Washington, and to avail themselves of the 
vast amount of material in the different museums 
and of the instruction of experts in the lines of work 
which such students may choose. This idea if car- 
ried out will throw open to many these immense col- 
lections and libraries which are now- used by but few. 
Of course special legislation by Congress will be 
necessary. The difficulty will be to convince Con- 
gress that this work of instruction can be carried on 
without interfering with the official work of the depart- 
ments. The educational advantages of the plan are 
immeasurable ; for its success will give to this coun- 
try the greatest university in the world. We sincerely 
hope that some plan may be brought before the asso- 
ciation at its next meeting in November, which will 
also meet with the approval of Congress. 



MAY FLOWERS. 

Anemonella thalictroides, L. Rue anemone. 
, Ranunculus abortivus, L. Small flowered crow-foot 
Taraxacum officinale, Weber. Dandelion. 
Equisetum arvense, L. Common horsetail. 
Equisetum hyemale, L. Scouring-rush. 
Equisetum sylvaticum, L. Horsetail. 
Anemone nemorosa, L, Wood anemone. 
Ranunculus recurvatus, Poir. Hooked crow-foot. 
Nepeta glechoma, Benth. Gill-over-the-ground. 
Aquilegia Canadensis, L. Wild columbine. 
Viola blanda, Willd. Sweet white violet. 
Viola palmata, var. cucullata. Gray. Common blue 

violet. 
Clytonia Virginiana, L. Spring beauty. Swamp, 

South Amherst. 
Pologala pancifolia, Willd. Milkwort. 
Corydalis glaca, Pursh. Pale corydalis. Notch, Mt. 

Holyoke. 
Fragaria Virginiana, Mill. Strawberry. 
Potentilla Canadensis, L. Common Cinque-foil, 
Mitella diphylla. L. Bishop's cup. Plum tree swamp. 
Coptis trifolia, Salisb. Three caved goldthread. 
Viola pedata, L. Birds foot violet. 
Viola canina var. Muhlenbergii, Gray. Dog violet. 



Nemopanthes fascicularis, Raf. Mountain holly, Plum 

tree swamp. 
Mitchella repens, L. Partridge berry. 
Barbarea vulgaris R. Br. Winter cress. 
Arisaema triphyllum, Torr. Indian turnip. 
Amelanchier Canadensis, Torr. & Gray. Shad-bush. 
Asarum Canadensis, L. Wild ginger. Plum tree 

swamp. 
Aralia trifolia, Decsne. & Planch. Groundnut. 
Pedicularis Canadensis, L. Common lousewort. 
Geum rivale L. Purple avens. 
Clintonia borealis, Raf. Yellow lily of valley. 
Ranunculus bulbosus, L. Bulbous butter-cup. 
Ranunculus acris, L. Tall butter-cup. 
Uvularia perfoliata, L. Bellwort. 
Okesia sessilifolia, Watson. Okesia. 
Saxifraga Pennsylvanica, L. Swamp saxifrage. 
Thaspimaureum, Nutt. Meadow-parsnip. Mt. Tobey. 
Vibernum lantanoides, Michx. Hobble bush, Pratts 

Corner 
Comandria umbellata, Nutt. Bastard toad-flax. 
Polygonatum biflorum, Ell. Small Solomon's seal. 
Tiarella cordifolia, L. False mitre-wort, Mt. Tobey. 
Stellariapubera, Michx. Great chickweed, Mt. Tobey. 
Fragaria vesca, L. Mountain strawberry. Mt. Tobey. 
Trillium cernum, L. Wake robin. 
Trillium crythrocarpum, Michx. Painted T. Plum 

tree swamp. 
Geranium maculatum, L. Wild cranesbill. 
Thalictrum divicum, L, Early meadow-rue. 
Maranthemum Canadensis, Desf. False lily of valley. 
Prunus Pennsylvanica, L. Redcherry. 
Prunus Virginiana, L. Choke cherry. 
Prunus serotina, Chrs, Black cherry. 



NATURE'S SOLITUDES. 

THE MYSTIC MOUND. 

We stood beside a mound of earth, Arthur and I. 
Around us were the forest trees, through whose leafy 
branches the sunlight was sifted on a carpet of 
last year's leaves. A June Zephyr was gently 
stirring the foliage overhead, making a pretty effect of 
light and shadow on the ground beneath. 

It was one of those dreamy afternoons in summer, 
when all nature breathes love and joy. The warbler 
were singing and flitting about in the bushes near by. 
From the distance we caught the notes of the Hermit 



14^ 



i^U-iLiiii, L>ll''"E. 



thrush, and the shrill cry of the Kingfisher as he flew 
along the river. We lay down on the soft needles 
beneath an old pine and dreamed. Beside Arthur's 
head a moccasin flo^ver nodded from the summit of 
a slender scape, and on the mound in front of us two 
or three pipsissev/as were blooming. 

Arthur broke the silence first. " I wonder, " he 
said, " if that mound marks an Indian's grave. How 
carefully nature has bestowed a few flowers in remem- 
brance. Who could wish for a more quiet resting- 
place than the peaceful woods ? How natural that 
the Indian should have found his grave among the 
things in which he lived ! Probably no human voice 
ever sang to his departed spirit : only the pines and 
birds sang his requiem. All the year round the wail- 
ing forest mourns him. But really. Bob, " he con- 
tinued, " I wonder if that is a grave. Have you not 
noticed the many other mounds near by. I should 
not be surprised if at some time, many years ago, a 
battle took place upon this very ground. Some hostile 
tribe, covetous of these pleasant hunting grounds, tried 
to drive the owners away. I should judge by the num- 
ber of hummocks that many warriors must have fallen 
if we should dig up yonder graves we might find a 
tomahawk and knife. Perhaps the enemy were victor- 
ious, and laid waste to some pretty village, the remains 
of which lie hidden not far from us. I sometimes 
wonder that more poets have not found a song in the 
mysteriously shadowed life of the red men." 

While my companion was thus rambling on, I dis- 
covered that we were not alone. Not ten yards away 
sat an old man. His figure was bent with age, and a 
long white beard trailed upon his bosom. He caught 
my eye at once and, slowly rising, came towards us. 

" Good afternoon, my lads, " he said, in a voice 
not yet broken." 

" Good afternoon, " we replied, 

" I hope you will pardon me for eavesdropping, " 
the old man continued, •• for I have overheard all that 
you have said. I love the woods, and have lived in 
them all my life. I love to see young people studying 
nature at a time when they are so easily impressed. 
Companionship generates love. We do not love a 
cousin simply because he is a blood relation. No more 
do we love nature, to whom we are related, if she is 
not a companion in our walks. The process by which 
nature endears herself to our hearts is as subtle as 



the senses themselves. We are all more or less con- 
scious of the beauties of nature ; the green grass, 
flowers, trees, and sky are part of our lives, but affection 
comes from companionship and from observation. I 
very much enjoyed your ingenious explanation of the 
mounds, but I know you will be interested to know 
the truth though it may spoil your pleasant dream. 
Many years ago, when I was a small boy, a terrific 
wind storm struck this part of the country doing fearful 
havoc with all that lay in its path. It swept through 
the forests, mowing down immense trees as a mower 
cuts down the grass. The uprooted trees took with 
them on the severed roots large quantities of soil, 
which gradually fell off under the action of the rain, 
causing these mounds that you see scattered about 
through the woods. The trees have long since 
decayed and gone to dust, save perhaps one now and 
then like that moss grown log." 

"Why, I never thought of that!" exclaimed 
Arthur, and the old woodsman laughed. 

" He scattered my dream to the four winds in a 
hurry, eh ? said Arthur, as we walked homeward. 

" Yes, " I replied, " but all pleasures are not 
realities. What would youth be without its dreams. " 

Everett. . 



THE MAGNETIC DOCTOR. 

"Gentlemen," said Jim Lawdon to a group of 
chosen companions, " I have been endeavoring to de- 
vise a plan by which I may increase my worldly pos- 
sessions. I think all of you know my objection to 
doing any muscular labor ; besides I consider attaining 
wealth by the " sweat of the brow " as degrading to a 
man of my — a-hem — mental ability. Now, if you 
are disposed to help " — he looked inquiringly at the 
others. 

" Well, Jim," began Bob Appleton as spokesman 
for the crowd, "We knows you to be about the laziest 
cuss livin' when it comes to hard work, and we are 
also aware yer can bluff most any one on the face of 
the earth ; so if you've got a good scheme let's hear 
it." 

Jim Rawdon lived in the town of Bellville. Up to 
the age of eighteen he had been the most industrious, 
hard-working, and accomplished student for miles 
around. At that time however, he received a severe 
blow on the head from a falling chimney-pot during a 



AGGIE LIFE. 



149 



storm, As it happened Old Father Time just missed 
him, and after remaining unconscious for three days 
he slowly regained his former health. But a most 
remarkable change had taken place in this once so 
studious youth. The blow seemed to have affected 
his brain in a most peculiar way. He became ex- 
tremely lazy, developed an unquenchable thirst for 
liquor, and used his brain almost entirely for hatching 
up one scheme or another. He associated with an 
idle, drunken set of fellows, who were only too glad to 
back him in any money making scheme, provided they 
did not lose by it. 

On the following night there was to bs held at the 
neighboring town, Hammerton, a great religious revi- 
val meeting. It was at this meeting that Jim and his 
associates were to launch their money making scheme. 
Everything was well planned, the particulars talked 
over, and every man knew the part he was to play 
with unerring accuracy. 

A revivalist often prides himself on being able to 
work upon the feelings and imagination of his hearers 
to such an extent that they will believe almost any- 
thing. At some of these meetings people have been 
known to give their watches, rings, and even large 
sums of money, though next day after the spell had 
worked off, they were around again trying to draw them 
back. 

It was just this state of affairs that Jim Rawdon 
intended to take advantage of. He would let the 
Evangelist work the people into a semi-inspired state 
and then reap the benefit for himself. On the night 
in question the hall was crowded to overflowing, but 
Jim went early and had a seat right up near the front 
row. 

The evangelist had begun his address in a moder- 
ate tone, but soon worked himself into a terrible state 
of excitement. Assuming various contortions and 
swinging his arms almost out of their sockets he 
exhorted the assemblage: " Brethren," he cried " Do 
I stand here and see Satan tramping you under foot, 
making slaves of you? (Jim was taking a long breath). 
Arise, throw off the devil who makes misers of you. 
Give your mite to the church and thus — " Here 
an unearthly scream pierced the air, and Jim Rawdon 
fell back in his chair, — his eyes closed, and to all 
appearances unconscious. A wave of panic swept 
over the hall, even the preacher, accustomed as he 



was to scenes like this, felt a slight nervousness. Those 
near him rushed to the assistance of the stricken man. 
They bathed his face with cold water ; tried all man- 
ner of remedies to restore him to consciousness, but 
to no purpose. Jim was going to come to when he 
thought it was about time, and no sooner. 

' My friends," he said, his voice was slow and 
weak — •" I have been overcome by a strange sensa- 
tion. While listening to the inspiring words of this 
learned and eloquent man (so he designated the 
evangelist) I heard a voice whispering in my ear, 
imploring me to help the afflicted. At first I thought 
it was some mere fancy, but as the voice became 
more and more persistent the idea flashed upon me 
like lightning — perhaps I might do something. I 
strove to rise but everything seemed to swim around 
me and all was a blank. If there is anyone here suf- 
fering from any disease I might try to be of use to 
him. In fact, I am certain I can help any one so 
afflicted." 

When Jim Rawdon had thus declared himself so 
boldly, an unusual flutter of excitement traversed the 
hall. For a few minutes a buzz of whispered conver- 
sation was heard on all sides, until an old man with a 
long white beard, bent double, and supported by a 
pair of crutches, hobbled up to Jim and exclaimed in 
a shrill piping voice : 

" I hope you can do what you say, young man. You 
see how I'm twisted up. Its rheumatism — been 
twenty years like this. Just comeback from Mexico, 
where I went to see one of them Injun doctors — only 
time wasted though — he couldn't speak English, let 
alone cure me." 

Jim put on a most benign expression and turning to 
the old man said : " Sir, I feel confident I can be of 
service to you. Just let me lay my hands on your 
rheumatic parts." And he proceeded to paw over the 
cripple in a manner which an experienced masseuse 
would consider very peculiar indeed. 

However. Jim's pawing had a most extraordinary 
effect upon his patient. 

" I feel 'im," he cried. " The electricity's dartin' 
out of his fingers — it's going all through me. Yes, 
yes, that knee ! I haven't been able to bend it for 
ten years, an' look at it now, See how I can wiggle 
it about ! Who,d a thought it 1 You're a wonder, 
young man. My back too 1 First time I've straight- 



ISO 



AGGIE I^iVii. 



ened up these twenty years." 

The old man soon became so fully recovered that 
he threiv away his crutches, danced a breakdown, and 
went away declaring Jim to be the most wonderful 
doctor in the world. This scene caused tremendous 
excitement, and many pressed forward to be cured. 

Jim did a rushing business that night, and when he 
modestly intimated that his exertions had caused him 
a feeling of faintness, the proprietor of the leading 
hotel of Hammerton promptly invited the new doctor 
to be his guest. About two hours later Jim Rawdon, 
seated in a private parlor of the hotel, and surrounded 
by his accomplices, reviewed the situation. 

" Bob", he cried, singling out one of his compan- 
ions, " You were splendid : I actually didn't know you 
at first. That long white beard and wrinkled face, 
back bent double, the crutches. Why man you are 
a perfect artist at make ups. I could scarcely keep 
a straight face to see you dance a breakdown in the 
midst of that group of wondering faces. The rest of 
you did exceedingly well also, but I think Bob takes 
the bun.' 

Next morning the newspapers were full of the won- 
derful magnetic doctor, James Rawdon, and the bene- 
fit he would be to humanity. The news was flashed 
from one end of the country to the other. From that 
moment Jim's star of fortuuewas high in the heavens ; 
he charged $5.00 a visit for the first week, but busi- 
ness became so pressing, he was forced to raise the 
price to $10 and finally to $20. 

It didn't matter much whether his patients were 
cured or not, they must deposit their money first, 
and the more visits they made the better it suited 
him. If they could not be persuaded to believe them- 
selves well after two or three visits, he generally 
advised them to buy some of his magnetic tonic 
($1.00 per bottle) and to try a change of climate. 

Jim made money hand over fist for a while, which 
he faithfully divided with his partners. But the strain 
was too much for him. One fine morning he disap- 
peared leaving no trace behind him, except some 
creditors, buncoed patients, and a large number of 
bottles containing sweetened water. 

***** 

About two months later there was brought before 
a judge of a New York police court, a man charged 



with being drunk, disorderly, and obtaining money 
under false pretences. 

" Name ? " snapped the judge, 

" My name " replied the unfortunate, "is James 
Rawdon, the Magnetic Doctor." 

" Good ! I've heard of you. Ninety days hard 
labor. Next." 



A FORCED PRODUCTION. 

As tlie moon was rising slowly o'er the outline of the trees, 
And all was wrapped in stillness, save the nnurmur of the 

breeze. 
The old clock in the tower of a sudden tolled out one ; 
When students should then be sleeping if the day is best 

begun. 
But it seems a Junior — who'd been down town on a call. 
Was now but just returning, groping in the darkness of the 

hall. 
When in his room he struck a light, and in a studious way 
Looked o'er the schedule for the morrow, and to his great 

dismay 
He found he had not written his oration. 
Which if he cut another time, would put him on probation. 
He soon was seated at his desk, and having grabbed a pen, 
Began to write upon the " Maine " with crew of gallant men. 
'Twas an interesting subject but he found it hard to tear 
His thoughts from the recent visit to the girl with auburn 

hair. 
But he made a noble effort, ending in fine style, 
And soon his loud rehearsing could be heard for half a mile. 
At four o'clock his roommate growled from his sleepless bed 
" You'll be sunk with those of the Maine, if you don't shut up 

your head." 
The Junior then retired, and dreamed — which was no 

dream — that on consideration 
His paper was returned, but marked, "Shows hasty prepa- 
ration." 



THROUGH THE SPECTATOR'S GUSSES. 

The march of civilization, impetuous as It has 
proven itself to be, offers another example of the com- 
plete impossibility of feudalism occupying a foot-hold 
on this western continent. That the fittest will survive 
the trying ordeal so lately inaugurated between libera- 
lism on the one hand and barbarism upon the other, 
is beyond a reasonable doubt. 

The bloody stigma of the middle ages which has 
become so indellibly stamped upon the flag of tyranny, 
must be erased from this continent, at least. The 
history of the past, darkened as it has been by deeds 



AGGIE LIFE. 



151 



of violence and rapine, must no longer be allowed to 
repeat itself at our very doors. 

The question of ethical rights, as relating to us as a 
nation, no longer plays a part upon this stage of action. 
What preceeded the latest declaration of war has no 
place before the councils of our nation. The die has 
been cast. Whether rightly or wrongly is no concern 
of ours at the present day. That it has been cast, we 
must all admit, and now our duty is writ in letters of 
gold. 

The outcome of past events and recent diplomatic 
relations is but a sequel to the bloodiest historic past 
that the world has ever known. Unholy in its methods 
of procedure, unprecedented in its ignorant application 
of bloody m.orals, this history has always displayed a 
narrow minded, bigoted race whose love of conquest 
blinded it to all the nobler forms of life. 

Merely by an accident of expediency can this foreign 
nation claim any credit for establishing the western 
continent ; no claim can it ever make for a single 
humane action performed upon its shores. From first 
to last its path has been marked by terror and destruc- 
tion ; the ghosts of its victims rise in their scattered 
graves to fortell its portentious doom, and the torrid 
zone breathes the fetid vapors of its atrocities. 

Not content with destroying the Incas, who repre- 
sented a civil izai ion far in advance of that which these 
men may ever hope to reach, its chiefs pillaged the 
riches of those countries that they were too weak to 
govern. The plains of Mexico and the mountains of 
Peru are marked with monuments of massacre that 
tell to the world an everlasting story of shame and 
ignominy. 

Upheld by a false sense of national honor which 
breeds decay, the story of these people forms one of 
the blackest tales that adorn the world's annals. A 
national honor which no honorable man would counte- 
nance. A national honor that cannot point the finger 
of pride to one humane act or one generous word. An 
honor as empty as the baldest African fetich, built up- 
on nothing but a mistaken idea of caste pride. 

We, as Americans, have prided ourselves upon our 
liberty, our humane actions ; we are now about to offer 
the world a glorious example of self abnegation. It 
behooves us to exert our energies to their full extent 
to the upholding of the national government. Our 
boasted patriotism should not be an empty sounding 



word, it should be full of meaning and action. 

The Spectator, whatever his opinions regarding 
the righteousness of our cause, can see in the develop- 
ment of details only the ultimate victory of our civili- 
zation ; the utter annihilation of those ideas of govern- 
ment that are fit subjects for the tribes of interior 
Africa. But amid all this turmoil, a word should be 
spoken for calm consideration. 

The government has called for a stated number of 
volunteers and a week has not passed before the quota 
asked for is more than thrice filled up. This shows a 
spirit commensurable with our national history. But 
the Spectator would like to suggest to those who are 
anxiously waiting for enlistment that sometimes a 
patriot can do better work and more valuable service 
by staying quietly at home. 

If everybody should enlist, there would be a dearth 
of shop keepers and tillers of the soil, which happily is 
not likely to occur. There is as much honor in fur- 
nishing the sinews of war as in making use of them. 
You are serving your country as much by developing 
yourself into a useful citizen as are those who perish 
upon the bed of yellow fever. At the present the 
country does not need your aid ; be content to wait 
until that time shall come when, sore pressed and 
bleeding, she shall call you to the breach and then it 
will be your duty to plunge into the baptism of fire and 
use those educational advantages that you have nour- 
ished in times of peace, for the lasting glory of your 
flag. 

Any one can be the hero of a fight, when the excite- 
ment is high and the nerves tense, but the patient 
plodding of the slow toiler who meets the common- 
place difficulties of each day. with an unfaltering heart 
is thrice the man. His path is rugged and toilsome ; 
he has not the incentive of the active moment, and 
yet without him and his labor, victory would be impos- 
sible. 

The Spectator. 



Easter bonnet 

Fair maid. 
Golden sunshine. 

Promenade. 
April shower, 

Down pour, 
Easter bonnet, 

No more. 



-Brunonian. 



152 



AGGIE LIFE. 



0d^sebal). 



Haydenville 10, Aggie 7. 
On Saturday, April 23, our team played Its first 
game of the season on the campus which resulted in 
a defeat for the home team by the above score. 
Sheehan pitched a very steady game striking out 
several of our men. Halligan pitched the first six 
innings for Aggie and Eaton pitched the last three. 
We clearly outplayed Haydenville both in the field 
and at the bat and had the game won up to the ninth 
inning when the team became rattled because of an 
error by Eaton. Before they recovered the visiting 
team had scored five runs. With a little practice our 
team would greatly improve in batting as was evident 
in the seventh inning when they bunched their hits 
with two out, scoring two runs. Too much credit 
cannot be given Ahearn for his grand showing in the 
field. The features of the game were Ahearn's field- 
ing, the difficult catch of a low line drive by Hooker, 
and the steady playing of Crowell. The score is as 
follows : 





HAYDENVILLE. 












A.B. 


R. 


B, 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Burke, ss. 


5 


2 





1 


1 





Hennessey, 1. f. 


4 


1 


1 


1 








Keating, 3b. 


5 


1 


1 


1 





1 


Moakler, 2b. 


3 


2 





2 


4 


n 


Dumphey, lb. 


5 








6 





1 


McCarthy, c. 


4 





2 


13 





2 


Murphy, r. f- 


4 


1 


1 








I 


Trainer, c. f. 


3 


1 


1 


3 








Sheehan. p. 


3 


2 


1 





3 





Totals. 


36 

AGGIE 


10 


7 


27 


8 


5 




A.B. 


R. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Warden, 3b, 


5 


1 





4 


1 


n 


Hinds, 1. f. 


2 


3 





1 








Dorman, r. f. 


5 


I 


1 











Crowell. c. 


5 





2 


9 


1 





Eaton, lb., p. 


4 





1 


3 


2 


3 


Ahearn, s. s. 


3 





1 


5 


1 


1 


Hooker, c. f. 


4 


1 


1 


1 





n 


Halligan, p., lb. 


4 





1 


2 


3 





Paul, 2b. 


4 


1 


2 


2 








Totals, 


36 


7 


9 


27 


8 


4 


Innings, 




1 2 


3 4 


5 6 7 


8 9 




Haydenville, 







3 1 


1 


5- 


-10 


Aggie, 




2 2 





2 


1 0- 


- 7 



Stolen bases— Burke 3, Moakler, Murphy, Ahearn, Paul 2, Hennessey, 
Keating, McCarthy, Trainer, Hinds, Dornian. Two-base hits— Burke, 
Keating, Halligan. Three-base hit— Hooker. First-base on balls— off Hal- 
ligan 5, off Sheehan 3,off Eaton 1. Struck out— by Sheehan 12, by Halligan 
5, by Eaton 2. Batter's hit— by Halligan 2, by Sheehan 1 . Passed balls- 
McCarthy 3. Time— 2-15. Umpire— Turner. 

Mass. Acri'l College 17; Vermont Academy 8. 
On Wednesday, April 27, Aggie defeated Vermont 
Academy at Saxton's River, 17 to 8, The terrific 
batting of our team was very encouraging. We 
bunched our hits just at the right time and every man 



seemed to be in the game for all that it was worth. 
Aggie indeed had hard luck when acting Capt. War- 
den became injured by sliding to second base in the 
first inning. He tried to play, but he had to retire. 
After a short rest he helped the team wonderfully by 
his good coaching. Vermont made all her runs in 
the first two innings but after that they could not seem 
to do anything towards scoring. On the other hand 
our team braced up and scored in nearly every inning. 
Halligan was given fine support and Hooker again dis- 
tinguished himself by a phenomenal catch just over 
second base. Even the Academy girls cheered him 
as he walked to the bench. If the team keeps on 
playing as it did Wednesday Aggie will certainly 
make a fine showing this year. For Aggie the batting 
of Hinds, Ahearn and Graves was the feature while 
for Vermont, Craig at centre field distinguished him- 
self by catching several difficult flies. The score is 
as follows : 





B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


Warden, 3. 


1 











Rogers, 3. 











1 


Hinds, l.f. 


3 


2 








Dorman. r.f. 


1 


1 








Crowell, c. 





8 


1 





Graves, 1, 


3 


8 





1 


Hooker, m. 


1 


2 








Halligan, p. 


1 


3 


2 


1 


Ahearn, s. 


3 


2 


1 





Paul, 2, 





1 


2 





Totals, 


13 

VERMONT ACADEMY. 


27 


6 


3 




B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Fisk, 1. 





6 





1 


Hutch'son, s. 





2 


2 


1 


Craig, c. m. p. 


1 


8 


2 


1 


Perry, m. p. 





2 


1 





Orton, c. 





3 








Sherb'ne m. 














Hahn, 2. 


1 


4 


2 





Adams, r.f. 





2 


1 


1 


Alden, 3. 


1 








1 


Higgins, l.f. 


1 












Totals, 4 27 8 4 

Runs made— by Warden, Hinds 3, Crowell 2, Graves 2, Hooker 2, Halli- 
gan, Ahearn 3, Paul 2, Dorman I, Sherburne, Higgins, Craig 2, Hutchin- 
son 2, F-sk 2. Umpires — Tellier and Turner. Time— 2 hrs. 30 m. 



^olle;^f ^lo■t^S. 



— Tennis ! 

— Pay your base ball subscription. 

— W. E, Chapin '99 has moved to the house of 
Lieut. Wright. 

— Rice '01 recently spent a few days at his home 
in Pittsfield. 

— J. S. Eaton has been in Boston for a week on a 
chernica! trip. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



153 



— H. E. Walker '00 has been in Maiden for the 
past few weeKs. 

— The field-piece which was left at the College has 
been sent to New York, 

— The senior class has voted not to hold class -day 
exercises at Connmencement. 

— B. H. Smith '99 is now rooming wih H. H. 
Roper, at the Hatch Experiment Station. 

— The Hatch Experiment station has recently issued 
a bulletin on " Concentrated feed stuffs." 

— Mrs. L. E. Sanderson has been engaged to train 
the College choir for the following term. 

—Boston University has for a total number of stu- 
dents 1454, of which 415 are young women. 

— The game with Storrs which was to be played 
Saturday, the 30th, was cancelled on account of sick- 
ness at the Connecticut college. 

• — The illustrated weeklies in the reading-room 
should have better care. At this time they are espec- 
ially valuable and should be preserved. 

— Preparations for the practice of field-athletics, 
have been made and it is to be hoped that the stu- 
dents will make the track team a success. 

— Pres't Goodell has recently been in Washington 
on business relating to the " Homestead Bill " with 
which the College is so closely connected. 

— A. N. Caudell and W. W. Stevens, students at 
the Insectary. have gone to Maiden, where they are 
employed by the Gypsy Moth commission. 

— Word has been received from Brown '00 who 
has enlisted in the heavy artillery. He is awaiting 
orders to join his regiment at Fort Warren, 

' — The ball teams plays on the campus this after- 
noon with the Northampton Y. M. C. A. The next 
game will be played with Trinity at Hartford, May 7. 

— As this year is the twenty-fifth anniversary of 
Boston University, no representative of the senior 
class will represent M. A. C^ at their commencement 
exercises. 

— The Y. M. C. A. hand-book has recently been 
published. It is neatly gotten up, and altogether is a 
most comprehensive guide and much credit is due to 
the committee which had it in charge. It was pub- 
lished earlier than usual in order that it might be sent 
to those intending to enter College next fall. 



— Dr. Stone of the Botanical department, is among 
the list of contributors to the " Journal of Applied 
Microscopy," a new magazine published in the inter- 
ests of science. 

— Iron pipe railings are going to be placed about the 
lower windows, on the east side of South College. 
This will be a great improvement and will be appreci- 
ated by the students. 

— Lieut. Dickinson of the 17th Infantry, former 
commandant at the College who has been stationed 
at Columbia Barracks, Columbus, Ohio, has been 
ordered to the front. 

— At a recent meeting of the Sophomore class, the 
following officers were elected : Pres't, A. D. Gile ; 
vice -pres't, J. E. Halligan; sec'y and treas., E. T. 
Hull. Tennis director, W. B. Rogers. 

— Wiley '98 has been collecting fertilizers for a 
week with C. I. Goessmann. Mr. Wiley has accepted 
a position at the Experiment Station, filling the 
vacancy made by the resignation of G. D. Leavens. 

— A special class has been formed in College, for 
the study of Chemistry. This class includes both 
undergraduates and graduates, and others who are 
especially interested in the subject. 

— Orders have been received to the effect that the 
Springfield rifles may be called for. All property 
belonging to the Military Department has been col- 
lected and is held in readiness to ship at short notice. 

- — At an entertainment and supper given at North 
Amherst City on Friday evening, a quartette from the 
College rendered selections, and Stanley brothers 
and W. H. Armstrong favored the audience with 
music on the banjo and zither. 

— The baseball schedule corrected to date is as 
follows : 
Wednesday, May 4, Northampton Y. M. C. A. at 

Amherst. 
Saturday, May 7, Trinity at Hartford. 
Wednesday, May 1 1 , open date. 
Friday, May 13, Amherst at Pratt Field. 
Wednesday, May 18, Univ. of Maine at" Amherst. 
Saturday, May 21, Williston at Amherst. 
Wednesday, May 25, Amherst Freshman at Amherst. 
Saturday, May 28, Northampton Y. M. C. A. at 

Northampton. 
Wednesday, June 1 , open date, 
Saturday, June 4, Williston at Easthampton. 



154 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Lieut. Wright, iiaving received orders to join the 

troops at Mobile, left town on the nineteenth of April. 
He was escorted to the depot by the battalion headed 
by the drum corps. Before leaving he made a short 
address to the cadets in which he said that he regretted 
leaving the College, but that his first duty was with 
his regiment. 

A volunteer company has been started in town 

and the drills will be held in the Drill Hall. H. D. 
Hemenway is in charge of the company and it is re- 
ported that a large number have enlisted. The Drill 
hall is used with the consent of the President and it is 
not right that the students should in any way be a hin- 
drance to the drilling. 

Music in a college is an essential feature. This 

department at M. A. C. should be developed as much 
as any other. We want the musical part of the col- 
lege to always be prominent, but especially at Com- 
mencement. There are many fellows in college that 
have ability in this line, if they will only develop it. A 
trainer is provided, and every-thing done that is possi- 
ble to make this department a success. All who 
remains is for the students them.selves, —those that 
are interested in music, — to come forward and do 
their best. 

During his recent stay in Washington, Pres't 

Goodell was one of a committee appointed to visit the 
different scientific departments connected with the 
government. The business of this committee was to 
find out what chances there were for individual study 
at these departments and the president has reported 
most favorably. The heads of nearly all the scien- 
tific branches in Washington expressed their willing- 
ness to aid in every way a graduate of this College 
or of any other college, who should wish to avail 
himself of the opportunity of studying any of the 
scientific subjects. This is an opening of very great 
importance and will be a benefit to our colleges all 
over the land. 



Belle — " Did he go home after you refused him ?" 

Nell " No, he staid right on and said, • All things 

come to those who wait'." 
Belle — " And what came ?" 
Nell " Father's foot was first." — Epsilon. 



umni. 



The editor wishes to call to the attention of the 
alumni readers the death of a former superintendent 
of the college farm, Mr. D. A. Wright. Stricken with 
Brights disease. He passed away Nov. 13, 1897. at his 
home on Main St., Amherst. Mr. Wright was in 
charge of the farm from 1883 to 1891, during which 
time he did much to improve and beautify the college 
grounds. It was while he was in charge that the 
swamp west of the college buildings, which now 
forms the main tract of cultivated land, was cleared 
and drained. For the last few years Mr. Wright has 
assisted during the spring, in the ornamental work on 
the college grounds. He will be missed by many of 
the undergraduates, who have often listened to his 
tales of the college in its earlier days. 

'75. — W.H.Knapp, has sent word that he has joined 
the army as brevet lieutenant. 

'75. — Dr. Madison Bunker, D. V. S., writes that he 
expects an appointment to the navy as attendant on 
its rams. 

'78. — J. F. Hunt, superintendent, Brazer Building, 
State St., Boston. Address, Cliftondale, Mass. 

'89. — R. P. Sellew, travelling agent for the Cleve- 
land Linseed Oil Co., New York, writes as follows ; " I 
sail Thursday April 28 for Southampton to take a trip 
through England, Holland, Belgium, France and Ger- 
many on business for the company." Mr. Sellew's 
address is, Fahys Building, 29 Liberty St., New York 
City. 

'89. — W. N. Tolman, division B, Naval brigade, 
M. N. V. on board Minnesota. 

'90. — F. W. Mossman, assistant chemist, depart- 
ment Foods and Feeding, Hatch Experiment Station, 
Amherst, Mass. 

'91. — Claude A. Magill now a member of the firm 
of Thayer & Magill, civil engineers in Westfield, has 
tendered his services to Gov. Wolcott in case of war 
with Spain. 

'94. Louis C. Barker has forwarded to the Life 
editor his business address. Mr. Barker is now with 
French & Biyant, civil engineers, 234 Washington St.. 
Brookline, Mass. 

'94. — R. F. Pomeroy was in town last week on 
business. 



AGGIE ]LIFE, 



155 



'94. — E. L. Boardman accompanied by his wife 
made a short stop in town last week. 

'95. — H. A. Ballow, married March 28, at Bernard- 
ston, Mass. to Miss Josie B. Hartwell. 

'95. — Wright A. Root, milk dealer, 5 Brewster 
court, Northampton, Mass. 

'95. — S. P Toole, gardener for J. DeCordova, 
Lincoln, Mass. 

•95. — H. D. Hemenway has charge of a squad of 
home guards, which drill regularly in the college drill 
hall. • 

'96. — F. E. DeLuce, Free Lending Library of the 
Union for Christian Workers, 67 and 69 Schermer- 
horn St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'96. — Fletcher, Jones and Shultis, committee for 
'96, are making plans for a class reunion at com- 
mencement. 

'96. — A. B. Cook paid a flying visit to friends in 
town last week. 

'96. — W. B. Harper, student at Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, Blacksburg, Va. 

'97._j. w. Allen, with M. J. Sullivan at '• Rocks 
Farm " Littleton, N. H. 

'97. — C. I. Goessmann, assistant chemist at the 
Hatch Experiment Station has just returned from a 
collecting trip through the eastern part of the state. 

'97. — c. A. Peters, assistant to Dr. Wellington, at 
the Chemical Laboratory, recently spent several days 
at his home in Worcester. While at home Mr. 
Peters paid a visit to M. E. Cookex-'97 at Shrewsbury, 
who is conducting an extensive greenhouse business. 
Mr. Peters reports that Mr. Cook is making a specialty 
of growing and originating new varieties of carnations 
finding a ready market for thousands each week, in 
Boston. 

'97. — c. F. Palmer, instructor at the "Good Will 
Home," East Fairfield, Me., is now also in charge of 
the School's Horticultural Department. 

'97. — L. F. Clark, is instructor at Dr. Brown's 
Institution at Barre, Mass. 

Ex.-'97. Allen M. Nowell, planter, Hawaii, S. I. 

Two-Year-'95. — C. W. Delano is taking a special 
course at the Veterinary Department of Harvard 
University. 



Ex.-99. — George F. Keenan has joined, A. division 
of the Naval Brigade of M. N. V. and is on board 
the Minnesota. 

Ex. -00. — C. E. Risley, in charge of the dairy 
department of the " Sybil Farm," G. D. Leavens, pro- 
prietor, Grafton, Mass. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

The Monroe Doctrine, by W. F. Reddaway, B. A. 

This little book of 1 62 pages recently added to our 
library gives from the English point of view, a clear 
and forcible presentation of the origin, development 
and results of the Monroe Doctrine. The author, a 
fellow of King college, Cambridge, shows that while 
Canning suggested some points of the doctrine in his 
correspondence with Rush, this English diplomatist 
did not approve of the doctrine as a whole. He shows 
that President Monroe, who proclaimed the doctrine 
was not its real author, but that J. Q. Adams, Secre- 
tary of State, was the man who conceived the doctrine 
and gave it its real being and influence. The Spanish 
colonies of South America had rebelled and established 
governments of their own. Spain tried in vain to sub- 
jugate them. She appealed to the Holy Alliance to 
come to her help. Against this both England and 
the United States protested. The result was that 
European intervention failed and the independence of 
American governments was acknowledged. A further 
result of the doctrine was the check given to Russian 
and English colonization on the Pacific coast. It 
was appealed to in the discussion concerning the 
Panama canal and the Clayton- Bulwer Treaty. 
Although no direct appeal was made to the doctrine, 
its underlying principles secured the expulsion of 
Maximillian from the throne that France set 
up in Mexico during our civil war. The author's 
opinion concerning the doctrine may be learned from 
a few of his sentences: — " Their faith " the faith of 
the United States — " in their destiny increased, and 
the Monroe Doctrine expressed it." " That the 
United States are in some way free to lay down the 
law on nations for America is perhaps the second 
great source of error with regard to the Monroe 
Doctrine. That the Doctrine itself is a part of Inter- 
national Law, is the first. " "At small expense, 
therefore, the Monroe Doctrine had failed Europe and 



156 



AGGIE LIFE. 



M.. J. WLOM.GikN, 



Rear of Purity Bakery, 
AMHERST, MASS. 

of work srnarantced. 



v««^ . B~X . ^« L«> L«/ ^La rx J 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HE.^TiNG, FLUiBINO km GAS WORKS, 

HUNT'S BLOPK, AMHERST 



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delighted America. " " A keen English observer of 
trans- Atlantic institutions has termed it a fixed and 
permanent state of American opinion. " In view of 
recent events relating to Venezuela and to Cuba one 
may well devote a little time to the study of this 
monograph on the Monroe Doctrine. 

r/ze Water Garden by Tricker. This book, which 
may be said to be the only one of its kind, embraces 
the construction of ponds, adapting natural streams, 
planting, hybridizing, seed saving, propagation, building 
of aquatic houses, wintering, correct designing and 
planting of banks and margins, together with cultural 
directions for all ornamental aquatics. It is profusely 
illustrated, containing eighteen full page descriptive 
views as well as numerous other sketches. 

Marching with Gomez by Grover Flint. A war corre- 
spondent's field Note Book kept during four months 
with the Cuban army in 1896, It is of especial inter- 
est at this time showing as it does the exact condition 
of affairs in Cuba. The book is illustrated by the 
author and also contains an instructive historical intro- 
duction by Jchn Fiske. 

Military handbook hy H. C Croome. Prepared for 
the use of the National Guard of Pennsylvania. 

Minor Tactics by Major General C. Francis Clery, 
C. B. Captain Clery has made a judicious selection 
from the inexhaustible storehouse of history and the 
result is a valuable work for all interested in military 
tactics. 

The Conduct of War by Lieut. Gen. Von Der Goltz. 
Translated from the German. The book treats of the 
special nature of modern wars and of strategical offen- 
sive and defensive operations. 




liPlotoin 



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Wcrk Guaranteed or money refunded. Give ns a trial. 



102 Main St., opp. Court House, 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Pineapple, Lemon ami Gorman Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



RivEK Street, 



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Where 

WetandCold , 

Prevail \\Vml!5fv6©^<chosen /with x\ 




Consider —if you can keep the wet ont 
of your rifle it will not rustnoxfreeze. Only 

Marlin Repeaters s 

have Solid Tops, shedding water like a 'J* 

duck's back. Ou.v l'J7-page book (inst out) _. 

tells all about them. Up-to-date infor- (Js 

mation about po\vders,black and smoke- . / 

less; proper sizes, Quantities, how to it' 

load; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, jV 

jacketedt soft-nosed, mushroom, etc.; » 

trajectories, velocitie3,penetrations. All ?j 

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50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Tke Photographer, 

To the class of 'y7 M. A. C. MAKES A SPECIALTY 
OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly eonfldentiaJ. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

cienfific Jlineilcdti. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. liargest cir- 
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms, $3 e 
year; four months, fL Sold by all newsdealers. 

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Branch Office. 625 F St.. Washington, D. C. 



OFFICE OF 

B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE EOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amberst, Mass. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



E, K. BE 



Jeweler, 
Optician, 
Watchmakei . 



i'lRST DOOR FROM POST OFFICE. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED 



Cark-wr & AOK<H«U$t 



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A/iHa$t, Aa$$. 



PHOTOORAPHIG STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



lOS Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR AGGIE STUDENTS. 



RAZORS HONED, BARBBRS' SUPPLIES POR SAUE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E. H. HIGKIHBDN, D. E. S. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

9 TO 12 A^. ]Vn., 1-30 TO 5 F. IvI. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



Liverv arid Feed Stable, 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 

AMHERST, MASS 



PHOENIX ROW, 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

I^XTBIBEIIK C3-003DS_ 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



JI^Repairing done tvhile you tvait,.M& 

2 mm NIX ROW. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY Al^D FEED STABLE, 

T. L. FAIG-E, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMITT STREET, AMHERST, MASS, 



L. W. GIBBS & CO., 

James E. Stintson, Manager, 

CLOTHIERS and FURNISHERS. 

ALL THE NEW THINGS IN 

NECKWEAR, HATS AND CAPS, 

GOLF SUITS, &c. 



Cook's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night callj responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

«Co-OperatiYe Steal Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovatifi Establisliment, 

Aussie .A-eresTXt, O. M. "VSneiOHT' »©^ 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

"Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

Office : 
Next Dook West of Amity St. School House. 




(datehmakep and Optieian. 

Prompt skillful attention given to all fine 
mid complicated watchwork. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. .S. GAIES, D. D. S. 

E. K. BROWN, D. D. S. 



DEINTISTS 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered wlien desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 



STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 




ffiassaehusetts flgriealtut^al College. 

AT THE 

€01i£<iISaE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Kkm Hofses and MM Slieep 



And we beg to announce tliat we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For Information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



LEMUEL SEARS & CO., 

Wlioiesale Retail Grocers, 



Lemuel Sears. 
Henry G. Sears. 



20 and 22 DWIGHT STREET, 
28 RACE STREET, 



HOLYOKE, MASS 



R. F. Kelton. 



D. B. Kelton. 



dealers in 



Fresh and Salt Meats, 



POOLTRY, YEliETflBLES, Fiep JP 0YSTEHS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



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AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note liooks, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALU. 



AMHE RST H OUSE 

FIBST-CLASS IN IM^ PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, 



Manager. 



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We will sell you a good Standard Second-hand Typewriter for $2^.00. 

Write for full particulars to 



CUTTER XOWE 



12 A. Milk Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Established 1845. Tel. 2423. 




xwm. 



Among the improvements for 1898 are full flush joints, internal seat post and handle 



WiM) '^^^ P*^^' fastenings, self-oiling bearings, low frames and low crank hanger drop, nar- 



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row tread, new style handle bars, the most perfect crank hanger mechanism in 

existence. 

Stearns Chainless $125.00 

Stearns Specials 75.00 

Stearns Yellow Fellows 50.00 

Stearns Tandems 100.00 

Write now for handsome illustrated catalogue, free on application. 






m B. C. STEARNS ci CO,, SYRACUSE, A/. Y, ^ 




VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST, MASS., MAY 18, 1 



NO. 13 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

WARREN ELMER HINDS, '99, Editor-in-Chief. 

FREDERICK HARVEY TURNER. '99, Business Manager. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Ass't Business Manager. 
CHARLES MOREHOUSE WALKER, '99, College Notes. WILLIAM ANSON HOOKER, '99, Alumni. 

BERNARD HOWARD SMITH. '99. Library Notes. FREDERIC AUGUSTUS MERRILL, '00, Through the Spectators Glasses. 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS CROWELL, '00, Exchange. JAMES EDWARD HALLIGAN, '00, Athletics. 

ALLISON RICE DORMAN, '01. ALEXANDER CAVASSA WILSON, '01, 

Terms: $1.00 per gear in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Hinds, Pres. Athletic Association, 

Y. H. Canto, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. P. Nickerson, Sec. Reading-Room Association, 



Ninety-Nine Index, 



D. A. Seaman, Manager. 



J. S. Eaton, Sec. 

G. H. Wright, Manager. 

J- S. Eaton, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Cdi'to rials. 



This seems to be a remarkably unfavorable season 
for base ball so far as the weather is concerned ; and 
our baseball manager and players may possibly be 
pardoned for execrating our hard luck. Thus far in 
the season, three of our scheduled games could not 
be played ; but it was through no fault of ours. It is 
indeed discouraging to the team to have game after 
game fall through ; but we hope that better days 
are coming. Although rain and wind have made the 
practice anything but agreeable, the team has shown 
its willingness to work and we feel confident that with 
warmer weather the playing of the men will be much 
improved. What the team now needs is the hearty 
support of every student. Show the men that they 
have this by your presence at the games and by an 
encouraging word. To the team v/e would say, 
"Keep good courage ; every cloud has a silver lining. 
Hope for the best, work for the best, and play the 
game for all it is worth ! " 



The preliminary announcement of the meeting at 
Minneapolis June 22-24, of the Park and Out-door 
Art Association has been sent out. The first meeting 
of this organization was held at Louisville, Kentucky 
last year, the call being issued by the Louisville Park 
Commissioners. The attendance included represen- 
tative men from all sections. The name of the asso- 
ciation indicates its object — the promotion of interest 
in Park and Out-door Art. The association is formed 
on the broad lines adopted by the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science. Membership 
is by no means limited to the profession but includes 
all who are sufficiently interested in the objects for 
for which it exists. The papers to be presented at the 
Minneapolis meeting include among others : Aesthetic 
Forestry, B. C. Fernow ; Relation of Public Parks to 
Public Health, Orlando B. Douglas ; Duties of Park 
Commissioners, C. Waht ; Play-grounds and Plazas, 
W. W. Folwell. The proceedings, including the 
papers, are published in the Annual Report. The 
head-quarters of the Association will be at West 
Hotel. The park system of Minneapolis will be exam- 



158 



AGGIE LIFE. 



ined, and excursions have been arranged to points of 
interest, including an excursion to the Interstate Park 
at the Dalles of St. Croix. Information as to mem- 
bership and dues may be obtained from Mr. Warren 
H. Manning, Secretary and Treasurer, 1 156 Tremont 
Building, Boston, Massachusetts. 



It is not often that Life has the pleasing opportunity 
of offering a " God-speed " to so large a number of 
undergraduates as has fallen to its lot the past few 
days. Many of our colleagues have left us for the 
front, if stations along the northern seacoast may be 
so termed. The fever for enlistment has invaded the 
College, as it rightfully should, and those who have 
deemed it their duty to absent themselves from their 
collegiate duties and assume a more national work, 
have our best wishes for prosperity and success. 
When they shall return, be they battle-scarred or still 
immaculate in their new found regimentals, we will 
receive them with all honor befitting their achieve- 
ments ; we will rejoice at their victories and their 
names shall be sacred within our walls. It may be 
more than doubtful, if ever they are called upon to 
face actual hostilities ; but, whether they smell the 
smoke of battle or not, the same incentive is theirs ; 
and we shall praise them for their loyalty. To those 
who remain with us, there is little to be said. We all 
cannot be heroes of the heavy artillery, some of us 
must stay at home and keep the semblance of col- 
lege work, although we often find it impossible to 
feign a lack of interest in the daily journals. And 
yet, when that day comes, which is hardly to be antic- 
ipated in the present difficulty, when this country shall 
need every able-bodied man to help in a national 
defense, there will be no hesitancy, nor inaction, but 
the' College will arise as one body and shed its best 
blood for the perpetual existence of liberty and 
equality. 



SPECIAL CLASS IN CHEMISTRY. 

This class has proved so successful it is now pro- 
posed to continue it, with increased work, during six 
or eight weeks of the coming summer vacation. Sub- 
jects are to be taken up which cannot receive suffi- 
cient attention in the regular exercises. Two distinct 
lines of study will be pursued. One will include theory, 



history, biography, current literature and masterpieces 
in chemical investigation; the other chemical physi- 
ology and practice in manufacturing processes, with 
demonstrations in various industrial centers. 



FORMER STUDENTS AND COMMENCEMENT. 

One of i\\Q. former has remarked that because the 
coming commencement is to be the next after Tride- 
cennial the old boys may not be expected to return in 
large numbers. This sentiment reminds M. A. C. of 
the plausible plaint of an estimable lady of this town 
who said, "My ninetieth birthday was honored by a 
host of friends but my ninety-first, though more de- 
serving was passed by unnoticed " 

The college and its perennial work are not less sig- 
nificant in the eyes and hearts of her true sons, than 
they were twelve months ago. And as one and thirty 
show more than a three per cent, gain in age over the 
Tridecennial, we look for an equivalent increase in 
hearty good will and good cheer next June. 

After many years of doubt and dreary effort the col- 
lege has passed its experimental stage. It has won a 
firm position among the institutions which show young 
men their places and prepare them for their life work. 
Last summer our men by their presence and by their 
unbounded enthusiasm showed what sort of stuff M.A. 
C. grows on the farm. They came here in answer to 
a challenge, to prove that we also have a college spirit 
and an unquenchable enthusiasm for our work as 
well as the alumni of any other institution. They 
came to prove that behind the efforts put forth here, 
during the academy year, there is a strength of en- 
dorsement of which no man may say ill. That dem- 
onstration was worth far more than its cost. 

It has been a working capital for each branch of our 
college force, but for the students more than for any 
other. Evidence of this is plainly visible in increased 
devotion, to work and in decreased attention to misde- 
meanors. A large proportion of our students come to 
the college before ever seeing much of the actual, 
practical, business world. In view of the nature of 
our studies, this is unfortunate. However devotedly 
our teachers may work, they cannot wholly make up 
for lack in the personal experience of the student in 
this respect. 

It is therefore highly important that occasions should 



AGGIE LIFE. 



159 



multiply on which this help may be obtained. Such 
demonstrations as the Institute of the State Dairymen 
last March, and others of the past year tend to the end 
in view. But nothing has been so inspiring to the senior, 
junior, sophomore and freshman or to the post-grad- 
uate as that which met his eye at the Kommers. On 
this occasion we saw hundreds of young men who in a 
wide range of occupations are successful in life. 
What inspired us was their eagerness to testify from 
actual experience to the great value which the course 
of training here has been to them in their battle for 
success. And when we heard them all say, that the 
institution never before offered the equal of its pres- 
ent facilities, we wished and hoped that at every com- 
mencement the freshman class might witness a simi- 
lar exhibition of the value of our college. There is 
to be a Kommers this year. We believe the former 
students will attend commencement in large numbers. 

M. A. C. 



YOUMG MAN! 

Do you Know why one of your neighbors is success- 
ful in life and another is not ? What lies at the bot- 
tom of a great name or fame or fortune ? 

An untrained man is an uncertainty, a well trained 
man is always successful. 

The State of Massachusetts offers to young men, at 
very low expense, a thorough training. If you wish to 
be an 

Artist Notary 

Botanist Office-holder 

Chemist Paper manufacturer 

Dairyman Quick business man 

Engineer Railway manager 

Entomologist Stock-raiser 

Fruit Grower Teacher 

General Farmer U. S. General 

Horticulturist Veterinarian 

Inventor Wool manufacturer 

Journalist Xylographer 

Knight of knowledge Yachtsman 

Landscape gardener Zoologist, 

Market gardener 
take the examinations at the College at 9 o'clock 
Thursday morning, June 23. next. If possible go and 
look over the museums and laboratories on June 22d , 
or at any time before. You will find them very 
instructive. 



NATURE'S SOLITUDES. 

ON THE LAKE. 
" A lance of sunlight lies upon the lake. 
Flung lightly from the purple waters edge, 
While high o'er-reaching ragged cliff and ledge, 
The white mists loom, and from their damp hair shake 
Pearl dew upon the herons in the brake ; 
With stutt'ring accents from the tufts of sedge, 
The poor persistent katy-did, its pledge 
Of love repeats, and bids the loon awake. 
No ripple mars the perfect calm, save when the wind scuds 

past ; 
A vagrant hunter's gun sounds in the distance ; while through 

the morning light, 
A heron, slow-rising from the fen, 
Goes lumb'ring westward where the setting sun. 
Sprays gold-dust on the ebon wings of night." 

No one who has ever stood on the shore of some 
secluded lake at the close of a fine day in summer, 
just as the sun is setting, can fail to appreciate these 
beautiful lines of Clinton Scollard. While not appli- 
cable alike to all forest lakes, they are accurate enough 
to suit the aesthetic taste of the nature lover. The 
" ragged cliff and ledge " would seem to apply to a 
rugged sheet of water ; but most every lake of any 
size among the New England hills has some rocky 
headlands along its shore. 

Idling or fishing, it matters not which, one is well 
repaid for an hour spent upon a lake on a summer 
evening. The wind roiled and tumbled with cares 
sinks into a quiet rest and your own mood joins hands 
with thar of the forest life about you. There is there, 
that mild and gentle sympathy that steals away the 
sharpness of your darker musings. 

As a general rule I have found that the wind goes 
down with the sun, and the surface of the lake is un- 
ruffed, save perhaps by the slightest ripple. You are 
treated to all sorts of music ; the croaking frogs and 
tree-toads, the sibilant notes of insects, and the songs 
of birds, at the place where some small rivulet flows 
into the lake. 

" Where water-grass grows ever green. 

On damp cool flats by gentle streams, 

Still as a ghost and sad of mein. 

With half-closed eyes the heron dreams. " 
As the darkness deepens the whip-poor-will repeats 
its half defiant cry. The shadows along the shore 
begin to thicken, and a musk-rat, venturing out from 
his retreat, goes paddling by unconscious of the pres- 
ence of an enemy. 



i6o 



aCifiLsAJd. L^lk^'kL. 



Perhaps by this time the mosquitoes are beginning 
their work in earnest and you begin to think of return- 
ing to the shore. Unwilling before to break the 
peaceful harmony, you now burst out singing as a per- 
son often will at such a time. With the first notes 
there is a splashing on shore, a flapping of wings, and 
presently from somewhere in the darkness overhead 
comes a queer, uncanny cry. You at once recognize 
the peculiar note of the bittern. Having reached the 
shore you tie your boat, make your way to your hem- 
lock boughs or wend your way homeward, as the case 
may be. 



MAY FLOWERS. 

(Continued.) 

Dentaria diphylla, L. Pepper-root. Plumtree swamp. 
Dentaria laciniata, Muhl. Pepper-root. Plum-tree 

swamp. 
Vacclnium Pennsylvanicum, Lam. Dwarf blueberry. 
Vaccinium vacillans, Solander. Low blueberry. 
Smilacina racemosa, Desf. False Solomon's seal. 
Nasturtium officinale, R. Br. True water-cress. 
Acer saccharinum, Wang. Sugar maple. 
Potentilla fruticosa, L. Shrubby cinque-foil. 
Rumex acetosella, L. Sheep sorrel. 
Staphylea trifolia, L. Bladder-nut. Plum tree swamp. 
Erigeron bellidifolius, Muhl. Robin's plantain. 
Veronica serpyllifolia, L. Thyme-leaved speedwell. 
Ranunculus multifidus, Pursh. Yellow water-crowfoot. 

South Amherst swamp. 
Ranunculus fascicularis, Muhl. Early crowfoot. Mt. 

Holyoke. 
Viola primulaefolia L. Primrose-leaved v. Mt. Toby. 
Viola lanceolata, L. Lance-leaved violet. 
Viola palmatr, L. Common blue violet. 
Lupinus perennis, L. Wild lupine. 
Trifolium repens, L. White clover. 
Rubus Canadensis, L. Low blackberry. 
Pyrus arbutifolia, L. f. Choke berry. 
Pyrus Americana, D. C. American mountain ash. 
Crataegus Crus-galli, L. Cockspur Thorn. 
Cornus florida, Ls Flowering dogwood. 
Nyssa sylvatica. Marsh. Tupelo. 
Cassandra calyculata, Don. Leather-leaf. 
Habenaria bracteata, R. Br. Green Orchis. Plum 

tree swamp. 
Thaspium aureum, Nutt. Meadow-parsnip. Mt. Toby. 



Actaea spicata, L. var. rubra. Red baneberry. 
Actaea alba, Bigel. White baneberry. 
Chrysosplenium Americanum, Schlin. Golden Sax" 

if rage. 
Cerastium vulgatum, L, Mouse- ear chickweed. 
Myrica asplenifolia, Endl. Sweet fern. 
Arctostaphylos Uva-ursi, Spreng. Bearberry. 
Poa annua. L. Low spear grass. 
Anthoxanthum odoratum, L. Sweet vernal grass. 
Betula populifolia. Ait. Gray birch. 
Quercus rubra, L. Red oak. 
Fraxinus Americana, L. White ash. 
Aralia nudicaulis, L. Wild sarsaparilla. 
Acer Pennsvlvanicum, L. Striped maple. 
Sassafras officinale, Nees. Sassafras. 
Cypripedium pubescens. Willd. Lady's slipper. 
Quercus coccinea, Wang. Scarlet oak. 
Larix Americana, Michx. American larch. 
Betula lenta, L. Black birch. 
Betula lutea, Lichx. f. Yellow birch. 
Betula papyrifera, Marshall. Paper birch. 
Corallorhiza innata, R. Brown. Coral-root. 
Quercus prinus. L. Chestnut-oak. 

AGRICULTURE IN JAPAN. 

C. KOCHI. 

The inhabitants of Japan have for thousands of 
years been intensely devoted to agriculture, and they 
are able to produce sufficient grain for the support of 
the entire population of this country, while Great Bri- 
tain whose area is about the sam.e as that of Japan, 
imports immense quantities of grain for her own con- 
sumption, and grows only a fractional part within her 
borders, of the total needed to feed the people of the 
British Isles. 

The total area so far surveyed is little less than 84 
million acres, on which nearly 207 miillion bushels of 
rice, and 79 million bushels of other cereals are pro- 
duced. The land which produces this great quantity of 
grains is of two kinds, namely rice-land, and dry-land ; 
the difference being merely that the former is floo ded 
and turned into a sort of marsh. These two different 
lands are cultivated chiefly by peasant proprietors, 
tenancy being rare. The following grains are culti- 
vated there as winter crops : barley, naked barley, and 
wheat, and as summer crops: rice, common millet, 
Italian millet, crowfoot millet, finger millet, guinea 



AGGIE LIFE. 



16] 



corn, maize, and Job's tears, etc. 

Having regard to the immense predominance of 
rice, I shall try to describe the cultivation of it first. 
The work begins in April with the laying out of one 
corner of the rice field as a seed-bed. To this end 
the ground is first dug with a long-handled hoe, then 
levelled and surrounded with a little smoothed and 
hardened wall of earth, from 8 inches to a foot in 
height and thickness. A small gutter or irrigation- 
channel is brought into connection when possible, so 
that the bed can be flooded when necessary. 

The time for transplanting is about thirty days later 
and water is continually supplied until a few weeks 
before the harvest, as it was in the seed-bed. The 
harvest takes place from the end of September to the 
end of October, and sometimes continues well into 
November. 

Its need of a warm climate is greater than that of 
most other kinds of grain, and it demands a larger 
amount of moisture than almost any other cultivated 
plants of any importance, therefore a poor supply of 
rain brings failure of the crops and famine. 

After transplanting the rice in the field from the 
seed-bed it is only necessary to attend to watering, 
and later to weeding and a second hoeing along the 
rows. Now a part of the farmer's time and energy 
can be devoted to other employments such as silk cul- 
ture, and vegetable cultivation. 

The climate of Japan is suitable for raising many 
edible vegetables and the inhabitants consume a large 
part of the production. Sweet potatoes grow abun- 
dantly in the southern provinces. Egg-plant, tomatoes 
and beets grow with great rapidity. Melons, cucum- 
bers, and gourds likewise flourish exceedingly. 

The market gardens of certain larger cities are 
especially cultivated to meet the foreign demand, and 
in them may be observed every vegetable that is com- 
monly met with on American dining tables. Most of 
these have been grown from time immemorial in 
Japan, such as beans, peas, turnips, carrots, spinach, 
cabbage, onions, lettuce and radishes, but Irish pota- 
toes were until a quarter of a century ago almost 
unknown to the Japanese. 

Hemp and cotton are extensively grown, so that in 
many instances the farmer is able to provide the 
material for his clothing, and his family weave and 
prepare it for his wear. 



Notwithstanding this, the recent development of the 
cotton spinning industry in Japan has compelled her 
to import nearly thirteen million dollars worth of 
cotton yarn from the United States and India during 
last year. 

For many centuries the sugar canes have been 
planted in the southern provinces, while a large fac- 
tory v/as opened in the northern end of the country 
about fifteen years ago by the aid of the government 
to make beet sugar, and their productions are 
ranked as first class in both quantity and quality. 
Still we are importing nearly two million dollars 
worth of brown sugar together with a little over five 
million dollars worth of white sugar yearly from the 
United States since the last few years. 

It was a great blessing for Japan to secure sov- 
ereign right over Formosa as a result of the late war 
with China, and we might not be surprised to see that 
this new dominion of Japan will become the Sand- 
wich Islands of Asia in the near future. 

Fruit trees are abundant ; the persimmons, oranges, 
pears are the most common and best producers. 

Plums, peaches and apricots are almost as much 
valued for their blossoms as for their fruit. 

The great scale upon which frugiferous trees have 
been introduced from America and Europe during the 
last two decades, cannot fail to transform Japan into an 
extensive fruit growing country, for in the matter of 
climate a more promising field could scarcely be 
selected. 

Chestnuts, walnuts and fig trees flourish throughout 
Japan. The sago-palm and banana exist in the South, 
but the climate is not tropical enough for them to 
produce good fruit. 

In the neighborhood of Tokio, the capital of Japan, 
vines have been cultivated for the last fifteen years 
upon the American system, and excellent claret has 
been produced, which has a reputation throughout the 
country. 

Over and above all these gifts of nature the people in 
Japan possess a great variety of trees. At no time 
of the year do the hills and valleys of Japan seems to 
be utterly bare of foliage, as so many of the trees are 
evergreen. 

Among trees which are held in high esteem for 
their excellent properties apart from their worth as 
timber are the mulberry, without which Japan could 



l62 



AGGIE LIFE, 



not be a silk- producing country, the vegetable wax 
tree grown in the southern regions, and the giant 
camellia, from the seeds of which a most serviceable 
oil is extracted in large quantities. 

Not only are the inhabitants of this paradise seek- 
ing to cultivate this land to the best advantage, but 
the government is also trying to improve the condi- 
tion of the farming population. They can get the 
most excellent imported fruit trees and vegetable 
seeds from the local experiment stations at purely 
nominal figures, so as to introduce a new form of 
agriculture from the civilized world. 



" Cast thy bread upon the waters and it will return 
to thee after many days, " said Madge Fulton with a 
dry little laugh as she threw a bottle over the side of 
a boat. 

The speaker and three other friends of a picnic 
party had, an hour before, decided to row out on the 
ocean and let their boat drift while they ate their 
lunch. They had all greatly enjoyed themselves and 
were packing up what they had not eaten, thinking 
that it might not come amiss later in the day, when 
Madge Fulton seeing one of the boys about to throw 
a bottle overboard, exclaimed, " Hold on, please, 
George ; let me have that bottle. " 

" What for ? " said he teasingly. 

"Oh, never you mind. I'll show you," she 
answered. 

"All right," replied he, obeying her request. 

" Now, who's got pencil and paper ? Ah, thank 
you. There," said Madge as she finished writing, 
"you see I've got my name and address, and the date 
on this slip, and this note on it also ; — 

" Will the finder please return this slip of paper to 
the above address, stating time and place of finding." 

Now I am going to put this in the bottle and throw 
it overboard. " 

Suiting her action to her words she did so quoting 
from the Bible at the same time the sentence with 
which this story opens. 

" If that's the sort of fellow you are George, I think 
perhaps it is best for our friendship to cease, " 



" Oh, well, since you are so set on your ideas no 
doubt you are right. You may do as you like, Madge. " 

" I'm not set on my ideas. It is simply that I do 
not think it is right for you to pick up a girl as long as 
you are going with me. Then again I do not like 
the girl. You know very well I do not care how many 
girls you know and all that, but I don't like to have you 
pick them up. You would not like it at all if I did 
that sort of thing. " 

" I don't know who's got a better right to do as I 
want to than I have. You may do as you want to 
about picking up for all I care. " 

" Oh, if that's the way you think of me and our 
friendship Mr. George Stanton I think it is by far 
much better for us to quit being friends. Good-by. " 

With this last -sentence Madge Fulton disgusted 
and greatly disappointed in him whom she had been 
so proud to call her chosen friend, turned on her heel 
and walked hastily to her home. 



" Here George, see what I've found '' 

" Why, what is it, Fred?" answered his friend 
George lazily. 

" It's a peice of paper with an address on it and a 
note asking the finder to return it. I found it in this 
bottle underneath some seaweed. " 

George Stanton, for it was he, looking up carelessly 
saw the very same bottle and bit of paper his past 
friend and sweetheart had thrown into the water two 
years before, and with whom he had quarreled one year 
ago. And it is not to be wondered at that he was a 
little surprised and somewhat nervous as he said, 
" Let me have that slip will you Fred ? I know that 
girl and I'd like to send it to her. " 

He had many times regretted his rashness, but for 
many reasons one of which was foolish pride, he had 
never asked her to make up. But now as those days 
were so forcibly brought back to him, he longed for 
the old friendship. So that very evening he wrote to 
his old friend asking to be forgiven and for the friend- 
ship to be as it was once. 

A few days later he received the following answer : — 

Dearest George: — Your letter and the piece of 
paper gave me an unexpected but pleasant surprise 
yesterday, and I feel very glad that you wish for my 
friendship again. It is all right now. I willingly 



AGGIE LIFE, 



163 



allow you the privilege you ask for, of calling on me 
It looks as if I threw that bottle into the water to a 
good purpose, doesn't it ? It was simply a foolish idea 
but a lucky one. Hoping to see you soon I am as 
before. Your true and sincere friend, 

Madge. 
P. S. "Cast thy bread upon the waters and it will 
return to thee after many days." Do you remember 
this? M. " 



lase 



N. Y. M. C. A. 10, Aggie 8. 
Aggie was defeated in a practice game on May 4 
by the Northampton Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion by the above score. It was a listless game. The 
game was lost through the lack of practice. Errors 
were common and hits were few. The pitching of 
Eaton was very satisfactory up to the fifth inning when 
he lost control of the ball. He had five strike-outs to 
his credit. Halligan relieved him in the sixth. Had 
the team given the pitchers good support the score 
would have been different. This game taught the 
team a good lesson in that it showed what results 
from the lack of practice. The steady work of Barry 
and Keating for Northampton and the batting of Eaton 
for the home team were the features. The score is 
as follows : 



N. V. M. C. A. 



Keating, p- 
Barry, Ryan, c. 
Parisau, lb. 
Tarkin, 2b. 
Spooner, s.s. 
Howard, 3b. 
Parsons. r,f. 
Conroy, 1 f. 
Talway, c.f. 



S.H. 













Totals, 


44 


10 

AGGGIE. 


13 





27 


14 


6 




A.B. 


R. 


B. 


S.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Hinds, l.f. 


5 


1 


1 














Hooker, c.f. 


5 


1 


1 





1 








Dorman. r.f. 


5 











1 








Crowell, c. 


4 


1 


1 





8 


1 


1 


Eaton, p., lb. 


4 


2 


1 





4 


2 


1 


Graves, 3b. 


4 


1 








4 


2 


1 


Ahearn, s.s. 


4 


1 


1 


2 


1 


4 


1 


Halligan, lb., p. 


4 











5 


1 





Paul, 2b. 


4 


1 








3 


3 


1 



Totals, 



39 



Innings, 12 3 4 5 6 

N.Y. M. C.A., 10 2 15 3 

M. A. 0.. 2 10 2 

Stolen bases— Eaton, Spooner 



27 

7 

2 



•10 



Two base hits — Eaton, Parisau, Parsons. 
First base on balls— off Eaton 5, off Keating 4, off Halligan 3. Struck out— 
by Eaton 5. Batter hit — by Eaton. Double plays— Larkin and Howard, 
Graves and Eaton. Passed balls— Crowell, Ryan, Barry. Wild pitches— 
by Eaton 1, Keating 3. Umpire — Turner. Time— 2hrs, 15m. 



Amherst 10, Aggie 1. 
On May 13 Aggie crossed bats with the Amherst 
team on Pratt Field. We were nearly whitewashed. 
For the first two innings the game was very loose but 
after that we braced up and made a fair showing. 
Amherst stole bases at will owing to poor work of our 
battery. Whenever a man reached first base he was 
sure to reach third. Had Hinds slid to home plate in 
the second inning it might have changed the aspect of 
the game. These fine points such as sliding, sacrifice 
hitting, etc. are what win games. Several times we 
had men on bases but the necessary hits failed to 
come. The fellows all seemed to find the ball but 
were unable to place their hits. The team again 
showed lack of practice. The game showed us our 
weak points. The fielding of the team was wretched, 
most of the errors being made on the easiest of 
chances. The all around playing of Captain Gregory 
and Whitney were the features. 





AMHERST 














A.B. 


R 


B 




P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Gregory, c.f. 


3 




3 


1 


4 


1 





Tinker, r.f. 


5 




1 


1 


2 





n 


Fisher, 3b. 


5 




2 


1 


1 


1 


I 


Whitney, c. 


5 




1 


3 


3 








Thompson, s.s. 


5 










2 


8 


1 


DeWitt, l.f. 


4 




2 











n 


Watson, lb. 


5 




1 





11 


1 


n 


Moore, 2b. 


4 







1 


3 


1 





Davis, p. 


4 







1 


1 


3 






Totals, 



10 



27 





4 










3 




3 1 




4 










11 









4 


1 







7. 




1 1 




4 







2 


I 









4 










1 




2 4 




4 







1 


4 




2 




2 










! 




4 1 




3 







1 


1 




1 




3 










3 




1 2 




32 


1 




4* 


27 




13 10 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


1 


1 








1 





1 


1 — 10 














1 








0— 1 



V/arden, 3b. 
Graves, lb. 
Hooker, c.f, 
Hinds, l.f. 
Ahearn, s.s. 
Crowell, c. 
Halligan, p. 
Dorman, r.f. 
Paul, 2b. 

Totals, 
Innings, 1 

Amherst. 5 

Aggie, 

*Gregory hit by batted ball. 

Stolen bases— Gregory 6. DeWitt 4, Whitney and Halligan 2, Fisher, 
Watson, Moore, Davis, Crowell. Two base hits— Whitney 2, Fisher, 
Hinds. First base on balls— off Halligan 3, off Davis 1. Left on bases — 
Amherst 7, Aggie 5. Struck out— by Halligan 3, by Davis 2 Passed balls, 
Crowell 2, Time — Ih. 40m. Umpires — R. S. Fletcher and Turner. 

It has been suggested that we arrange a series of 
practice games with Amherst. It seems in the opin- 
ion of the fellows to be an excellent idea. Why 
couldn't we arrange matters so that we could play 
Amherst for a week at the beginning of the baseball 
season instead of their playing a semi-professional 
team. It would certainly benefit them considerably 
as well as get our team in better shape for the season. 



164 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THROUGH THE SPECTATOR'S GH!SES. 



There is a certain phase of Americanism that has 
become so prominent of late years that it can hardly 
fail to impress itself both upon the foreigner visiting 
our shores and upon the foreigner at home, Perhaps 
it is a trifle incorrect to attribute this failing, for it 
certainly is a grevious error, to Americanism in any 
way, for the Spectator is undecided as to whether it is 
purely a growth of our own development or whether it 
may not be also a fungus of foreign growth. That it 
is developing abroad is manifest, but its most detest- 
able form is shown within our midst. 

This fungus is a peculiar social organism that is, 
perhaps, a legitimate evil of a too hasty advance in 
civilization and its attendant spread of cheapening 
inventions. Its inherent tendencies are all that can 
be imagined of vile abuse and vilifying associations. 
Its spread is rapid and alarming ; its attacks insidi- 
ous and deadly. The remedy has not yet appeared 
in its best form, nor has the advance of this disease 
received any check of moment. 

Its technical name is probably, Journalestes Amer- 
icanae yellowcum, or, in plainer English, American 
yellow Journalism. This growth is a native of swampy 
places but is often found upon oaks and elms of other- 
wise rugged build and noble proportions. Its attacks 
are nearly always deadly, leaving its subject broken in 
constitution and utterly unfit for natural growth. 

The native beauty of whole tracts of land has been 
destroyed totally by its ravages and the splendors of 
whole avenues of waving beeches have been ruined 
by its fierce onslaught. The form that it generally 
takes, is that of a noxious mushroom growth, around 
the girdle of a tree about six or eight feet above the 
roots. The first signs of its appearance are a general 
tendency to destroy the bark and tender green shoots, 
next it attacks the inner and wooded fibres, and it does 
not desist until the very pith is destroyed and the vic- 
tim rendered totally unfit for any worldly use. 

The Spectator obtained an embryonic growth a 
short while ago and took it home to nourish and raise 
it if possible. Great care was taken with it ; fresh air 
was allowed to circulate about it freely and plenty of 
pure water was given it. Sunlight was allowed to 
beat upon the jar in which it was kept, but alas, it 
died. It was too fragile for the conditions imposed. 



Another growth was obtained, and with the kind 
help of a noted specialist in botany, the experiment 
was more successful so that now the Spectator is the 
happy possessor of the finest specimen of this peculiar 
plant that probably exists in this country. 

It was by the advice of this eminent botanist that 
the conditions were wholly changed, and it is to him 
alone that the Spectator owes his very fine results. 

The new conditions imposed were such as would 
appeal to the common sense when treating a fungus 
of this growth. A shady nook was found, a place 
where the sun's rays never entered ; the soil was rank 
with weeds and poisoned vines ; the air was close and 
stifling. Here, then, this interesting plant grew; and 
multiplied with wonderful rapidity, fed as it was upon 
all that was vile and rotten. Day by day, the botanist 
would come and visit the tomb, and there with the 
Spectator anew growth was witnessed, a new fungus 
more yellow and disagreeable than the original was 
started. Day after day, new expedients suggested 
themselves until the theory of its culture was almost 
perfect. It grew in size until its narrow cleft was too 
small to contain its rising form and until, in a luckless 
moment, it pushed its yellow head out into the sun- 
shine and then its death appeared, 

As soon as the sun's ray struck its curling edges it 
withered them and they crumbled away. The fresher 
air of the wide rolling meadows, the bright hopeful 
sunlight of a broader day totally destroyed the growth, 
So long as the fungus remained beneath the surface 
of the shadow of decay it flourished and prospered, but 
as soon as it reared its head into the warm sun so 
soon was it doomed. 

Its narrow bed is still to be seen. Its loathsome 
habitation is not yet destroyed. Its growth is contin- 
uous up to that rosy band of light that marks a 
broader humanity when the day opens hopefully, is 
filled with earnest endeavor, and is closed with a con- 
scious satisfaction that no deed has been committed 
during its flight that can bring any harm to a defense- 
less being. And yet, its roots are still firm in their 
foundation, and its growth goes on; only its advance- 
ment has been stopped. The work of the botanist has 
been well done, so far as it has gone. That which 
remains is a harder task. 

The light of day must be admitted to that noisome 
dell, and every trace of fungus growth destroyed, that 



AGGIE LIFE. 



165 



our noble elms and knotted oaks may continue to be 
the glory and pride of our country. 

The Spectator. 



Col 



— Botany-can vs. Bug-net ! 

— Summer — is coming sometime. 

— The college pulpit was occupied last Sunday by 
Rev. Mr. Lane of North Hadley. 

— The five representatives of Aggie at Fort Warren 
were mustered into service on Monday, May 9th. 

— ^The game which was to be played at Greenfield 
Wednesday was cancelled on account of the rain. 

— Messrs. Warden, Crowell and Dorman spent the 
Sunday of May 8th in Springfield visiting friends. 

— The date for the speaking of the freshman and 
sophomore ten has been set as Friday, May 20th. 

— Aggie does certainly have hard runs of luck — if 
you don't believe it ask the athletic team managers. 

— Professor Cooley recently took the freshman class 
on a trip to Northampton, to visit a large stock-farm. 

— A company of school-teachers from Montague 
recently visited the different departments of the college. 

— Word has been received from Fort Warren that 
Gile and Brown have been promoted to the office of 
corporal. 

■ — G. D. Howe of North Hadley is a candidate for 
the degree of M. S. His main study will be 
Agriculture. 

— J. S. Eaton has resigned his position as captain 
of the Base-Ball team and R. D. Warden is now 
serving in his stead. 

— Prof. Charles S. Walker will deliver an address 
before the members of the Amherst High School on 
Memorial Day, May 30. 

— C. E. Stacy of the junior class left college Sun- 
day morning for Fort Warren where he will serve in 
the regiment occupying that place. 

— The committee from the faculty to select the 
commencement speakers from the lower classes con- 
sists of the President, Professor Mills and Dr. Walker. 

— The special class in chemistry recently formed 
at the college will continue its session through the 
summer. The class will be in charge of Prof. Charles 
Wellington. 



— A. D. Gile and A. L. Frost of the sophomore 
class have enlisted, and are now on duty with the reg- 
iment of heavy artillery quartered at Fort Warren, 
Boston harbor. 

— Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck was recently summoned 
home to attend the funeral of his aunt. During his 
absence Prof. Ostrander took his classes, with the 
exception of the junior physics. 

— Dr. William P. Brooks recently spoke at the 
Farmer's Institute in Blandford, Mass. The subject 
of his address was." Crops of Forage and Silo" and 
he was listened to with much interest. 

— An exciting game of ball was played on Friday 
afternoon, the sixth, between the freshmen and the 
juniors. The game resulted in a defeat for the fresh- 
men, the juniors winning by a score of 14-11. 

— Interesting experiments are being carried on at 
the Hatch Experiment Station concerning the feeding 
of plants. Other experiments also have been com- 
menced, the results of which will undoubtly prove 
valuable. 

— No game was played with Trinity, May, 7th., as 
was expected. The team went as far as Northamp- 
ton, where the men were recalled by a telegram from 
Hartford, stating, that as the Trinity diamond was 
under water, the game would have to be cancelled. 

— Mr. Budd, the travelling secretary of the Y. M. 
C. A's. of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, recently 
visited the college and addresed the Y. M. C. A. 
He spoke in an interesting manner, and brought out 
clearly the importance and value of Y. M. C. A. work. 

— Lieut. Wright has recently been promoted to 
Aid de Camp in the 2nd. regiment of infantry, in 
which he is serving. It was rumored that the Lieut- 
enant had been sent to the hospital on account of 
sickness but this report proved to be a fake as he is 
enjoying the best of health. 

— The ten men of the sophomore class who are to 
speak before a committee of the faculty in competi- 
tion for a position on the Burnham Four, have been 
selected by Professor Babson. The men who have 
been selected are : H. Baker, C. A. Crowell, W. R. 
Crowell, P. F. Felch, J. W. Kellogg, F. A. Merrill, A. 
C. Monahan, M. H. Munson, F. G. Stanley and A. W. 
Morrill in place of Mr. Frost. 



1 66 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— At a recent meeting of the 1900 Index Board 
the resignation of A. D. Gile as Business Manager 
was accepted and F. A. IVlerrill was elected to fill the 
vacancy. E. K. Atkins, 1900 was chosen to fill the 
vacancy made necessary by the election of Mr. Mer- 
rill. Mr. Atkins will become the Art Editor. 

— Tennis is still progressing although not very rap- 
idly. One or two of last year's best players have been 
out but have not yet begun systematic training for the 
tournament. And, by the way, we have not yet heard 
of any arrangements for this event. Is it not time 
that some movement towards it should be put on foot ? 

• — Many trees and shrubs have recently been set out 
about the college grounds which, although the season 
is late, are assuming their usual attractive appearance. 
As a site for a college, our grounds are surpassed by 
those of very few institutions and the students should 
take pride in keeping the surroundings of the college 
buildings in first-class condition. 

— The program of the " Sauveur Summer School 
of Languages" has recently been issued. The school 
is held at Amherst College and opens July 1 1 , closing 
August 19. A most beneficial and practical course 
of languages is offered here, and any student who 
should wish to avail himself of this opportunity will 
feel amply repaid for his trouble. 

— We understand that Prof. Maynard is endeavor- 
ing to get permission from the trustees to cut down 
the tree which stands on the south-western corner of 
the campus. This will be a great benefit to the right- 
fielders on the base ball teams. As the tree now 
stands it is often directly in the way of the fielder and 
it certainly does not beautify the campus. 

- — If there were some racks for holding wheels 
placed in the bicycle room under South College, per- 
haps the students would be more free in using the 
room. As the conditions now are, a wheel must be 
leaned against the walls with danger of being scratched 
and at the disposal of anyone who wishes to borrow. 
Under these circumstances it is no wonder that the 
room is little used. 

— Professor Kinney took the freshman class on 
their first botanizing trip last Thursday. The class 
started at the ravine north of the college and followed 
the brook down through the marshes. A large num- 
ber of specimens were secured and what was more, 



all had a good time. The only serious accident 

reported happened to B s. A thought struck 

him so forcibly when he was standing on a log over a 
mud-hole that he lost his balance and fell overboard, 
filling his shoe and trousers-leg with mud. 

— On the slope southeast of Professor Brooks's res- 
idence, there is to be a commercial fruit garden. This 
will include all the paying varieties of fruits, such as 
apples, peaches, pears, small fruits, etc. East of this 
garden there is to be a fruit garden in which may be 
found specimens and examples of all our common 
fruits. In the course of time the whole eastern por- 
tion of the plant-house grounds, which formerly was 
the Colonel Clark property, will be the most beautiful 
spot in the surroundings of the college. 

— Don't be frightened if you hear cries of 
" Murder 1 " coming from the chapel after dark. It's 
only some freshman rehearsing his piece for the ten 
who will speak before the faculty in about a fortnight. 
We are glad to see, however, that the freshmen are 
taking some interest in this department. Heretofore 
it has generally been only the best speakers who would 
do any training, the others giving up in despair without 
a trial, but it is the training that tells, and this year 
we look forward to a hot competition for the Burnham 
Four. 

• — There is not much of a " snap" in enlisting as 
some students have been led to believe. At Fort 
Warren the men are obliged to arise at 6.00 every 
morning, and until 6.30 are put through setting up 
exercises, then inspection of quarters, and breakfast at 
7-30. At 8.00 quad mounting is held, at 9.00 
infantry drill for one hour and following that comes 
artillery drill which lasts until 12.30. At 2.00 p. m. 
infantry drill is gone through with and from 4.00 to 
5.30 artillery drill is the rule with dress parade at 6-00. 
Evidently those men who have enlisted are getting 
enough chances to air their knowledge of drilling. 



If I were only a king, tra la, 

And had a prime minister grand, tra la, 

I'd beat him to pieces 

If he didn't write me a thesis, 

If I were only a king. — The Earlhamite. 

What kind of preserves did Noah take with him in 
the ark ? 

Preserved (pears) pairs. — The Reflector. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



167 



umni. 



Ex-72. — Frederick A. Ober, Real estate agent, 
1608 New Hampshire Ave., Washington, D. C. 

74. — Asa W. Dickinson, travelling abroad for 
health. Address, Care Morgan & Co., Bankers, 
London, England. 

'90. — F. J. Smith, chemist to the Gypsy moth 
commission has returned from Maiden to his head- 
quarters at Amherst for a few days. Mr. Smith re- 
ports that a force of three hundred and sixty-five men 
are now at work cutting and burning infested woodland, 
and destroying the egg clusters which are just com- 
mencing to hatch. 

'94. — E. F. Dickinson in Dental Department of 
Harvard University. Address, 6 Concord Sq., Cam- 
bridge. Mass. 

'95. — H. A, Ballou instructor of Entomology, Bot- 
any and Military at Storr's Agricultural College, Conn. 

'86 — W. L. Pentecost, Sup't Edward Warren's 
Stock Farm, Spencer, Mass. 

'96. — B. K. Jones, Ass't Chemist at the Experi- 
ment Station who was called home several weeks 
ago because of a serious shooting accident to his 
brother, has returned and reports that his brother is 
slowly recovering. 

'97. — John R. Eddy ex-'97, Sup't of Zoological 
Park, Washington, D. C, was in town last week. Mr. 
Eddy is in charge of the landscape work of the new 
Zoological Park of one hundred seventy-five acres 
under the direction of the Smithsonian Institution. 

'97. — Chas. A. Norton is translating into English, 
Krauch — " Prufung der Chemischen," which he pro- 
poses to present to the college library. This work is 
exceedingly valuable to students of chemistry. 

Ex-'98. — Thos. H. Charmbury, nurse in hospital, 
Winchendon. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Das optische Drehungsvermogen organicsher Sub- 
stakzen unddessen prantische Anwendung. (The Opti- 
cal Rotating Power of Organic Substances and its 
Practical Application) by Dr. H. Landolt, Professor 
of Chemistry in Berlin University, and others. Fvr. 
Vieweg & Sohn, 1898, pp. 655. 



The progress of Chemistry from a jumble of facts 
to an exact science is well indicated by this rich vol- 
ume. The first edition appeared eighteen years ago 
and laid down the lines of study, in the field designated, 
which have been assiduously followed in the mean- 
time. Among the most striking discoveries in stereo- 
chemistry, or chemistry of space, are those of LeBel 
and Van t Hoff. The result of their investigations 
have opened new fields for study in the subject cov- 
ered by this book. They indicated the intimate rela- 
tionship between the rotation of the plane of polarized 
light, caused by many substances, and their chemical 
constitution. The present edition contains about 
three times the material of the former. The num- 
ber of substances showing activity on polarized light, 
was stated in 1879 to be 300. It is now known to be 
over 700. 

The author divides these into three classes, as fol- 
lows: Those which rotate the polarized plane of light 
only when in crystalline form, those which act thus in 
either crystalline or amorphous condition, and those 
\vhich act when amorphous, in liquid form or in solu- 
tion. Study of the asymetric carbon atom, and the 
methods of separating optically active from inactive 
substances, finish part first. 

Part second treats of the relation between the 
amount of rotation and existing physical conditions, 
such as wave-length of light and temperature. Part 
third explains the rotation of substances in solution 
and the theory of electrolytic dissociation. Part four 
fully describes forms of apparatus used, such as polar- 
izer, saccharimeter, lamps, tubes and explains deter- 
minations of density, etc. Part five gives the practi- 
cal uses to which optical rotation may be put, such as 
the quantitative estimation of cane sugar, glucose, 
camphor, quinine, cocaine, nicotine. 

Part six, gives the latest data known up to about 
the middle of 1896, that is nearly two years before 
the book is accessible to the public. The great labor 
in such a publication necessitates such a delay. We 
have thus before us an illustration of a part of the 
truth of a remark said to have been made by Agassiz, 
several years ago, that our best text-books are ten 
years behind the times when published. The English 
translation of the first edition and also the edition here 
described may be found in our library under 544 — 15. 



1 68 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E^chan:^es. 



The Exchange editor finds that many of the ex- 
changes of the last two weeks are not up to their 
usual standard ; or, it may be an illusion owing to the 
fact that a few were so excellent. Those especially 
good are The Delaware College Review, The Brunonian 
(always good), The Vermont Academy Life and The 
Oracle. 

THE MAINE. 
(Competitive.) 
All peaceful and calm, as the evening sun 

Dipped under the billowy spray. 
Lay a noble ship with its gallant crew, 
While the shadows fell and the zephyrs blew, 
At rest in Havana's bay. 

The stars, glistening bright in their silvery mail. 

Held watch o'er the slumbering brave, 
When a thundering roar broke the placid spell, 
And the once proud ship seemed a burning hell 
Half sunk in that hostile wave. 

The sleeper, aroused from his dreams of home. 

Saw the death-bolt flashing near. 
With a gurgling groan and a stifled cry, 
A prayer for mercy to God on high, 

He sank to a watery bier. 

All hail to the men who in battle grim 

Their blood for their country have shed, 
And again all hail to that valiant band. 
Whose lives were lost on a peaceful strand, 
The nation's honored dead. 

— R. Q. in The Holy Cross Purple. 

Havana, from The Delaware College Review, is an 
interesting story; but it could have been improved if 
the author had not introduced the long descriptive 
digression at its beginning. 



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Telephone connection. 



HEADQUA RTERS FOR AGGIE STUDENTS. 

HAIH DHESSIMG BOOMS. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SAUE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
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AGGIE LIFE. 



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Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifle's. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
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AMHERST COLLEGE 



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9 TO 12 ^Al.. Ss/L., 1-SO to 5 I=- 3VC. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



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AGGIE LIFE. 



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Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 



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Write now for handsome illustrated catalogue, free on application. 



m 
i 




VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST. MASS., JUNE 1, II 



NO. 14 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

WARREN ELMER HINDS, '99, Editor-in-Chief. 

FREDERICK HARVEY TURNER, '99, Business Manager. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Ass't Business Manager. 
CHARLES MOREHOUSE WALKER, '99, College Notes. WILLIAM ANSON HOOKER, '99, Alumni. 

BERNARD HOWARD SMITH. '99, Library Notes. FREDERIC AUGUSTUS MERRILL, '00, Through the Spectators 31asses. 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS CROWELL, '00, Exchange. JAMES EDWARD HALLIGAN, '00, Athletics. 

ALLISON RICE DORMAN, '01. ALEXANDER CAVASSA WILSON, '01, 

Terms: $1.00 per year in advance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside o{ United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Hinds, Pres. Athletic Association, 

Y. H. Canto, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. P. Nickerson, Sec. Reading-Room Association, 

Ninety-Nine Index, . . . . D. A. Beaman, Manager. 



J. S. Eaton, Sec. 

G. H. Wright, Manager. 

J- S. Eaton, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



r\ 



Is. 



There is all about us a field for observation and 
study to which we devote too little of our thought. 
What subject is broader ; what field more deserves 
our attention than Nature study? It is as broad as 
the universe. It includes many of our most interest- 
ing and instructive sciences. To be a student of 
Nature, one need not necessarily go to the bottom of 
Zoology, Botany and Geology. Nature's book is 
always open to us ; a new leaf is before us at every 
turn, still her greatest secrets have never been trans- 
lated. Her language is simple, but only those who 
love her can read or understand it. Her messages 
are not writen for those who run to read. We seek 
in books much that may be better learned in the 
fields. What was it that made Wordsworth the 
greatest of the poets of Nature ? Surely it was not 
his education at Cambridge. Was it not that he 
found in Nature the very temple of God, and here his 
heart overflowed with those feelings which he has so 
beautifully expressed for us? He is indeed fortunate, 



who can appreciate and enjoy the wonders of Nature 
whether they be found in the opening buds, in the 
pebbles under his feet or in any of the myriad forms 
of animal life. 



This June marks the twenty-seventh commence- 
ment of this college. In 1897 were held the tri-de- 
cennial exercises in commemoration of the thirty suc- 
cessful years through which this institution had just 
passed. This year marks an epoch in the world's 
history. Our government is at war with a foreign 
nation, and yet success is so certain to reward our 
army and navy, that we hardly need to give to our 
tormentors a second thought. Not so with our Com- 
mencement ; every loyal supporter, every friend, every 
Aggie alumnus, ought to make it a point, an oppor- 
tunity, to once more visit the scenes around which 
there is so much attachment, and endeavor to repeat 
the successful celebration of the previous year. There 
will be no drill this year owing to the enforced absence 
of the lieutenant, the drum major and five of Aggie's 
noble sons who left at their country's call to serve in 



170 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the patriotic legions of freedom. Tiiere will be no 
Class-day, during the exercises of this Commence- 
ment, for the graduating class, under the silent influ- 
ences concordant to a bloody war, prefer mutely to 
meditate on the vicissitudes of fortune. But, over- 
looking these few changes in the usual program, we 
feel certain that with students, professors and alumni 
joining each other in enthusiastic loyal support, the 
opportunities were never brighter for the present little 
band of '98 to leave behind them the usual sweet 
recollections of college days. 



Now is the time for loyal alumni as well as under- 
graduates to do their utmost to interest many young 
men in the college. The majority of high school 
graduates and preparatory school men may have 
decided where to go, but there are still many who are 
undecided ; to these a word should be spoken. An 
effort has been made this year to place in the hands 
of every high school graduate of the state information 
concerning the college ; but often a word from a friend 
to the hesitating student has more weight than any 
number of catalogs or pamphlets. The many letters 
of inquiry received this year show that interest in the 
college is more widely felt than ever before. Still we 
frequently have to correct the impression that the col- 
lege fits men only for the pursuit of Agriculture. The 
aim of the curriculum is much broader than this, and 
the success of so many of our graduates in widely dif- 
ferent lines of work proves that the college is fulfilling 
its mission of providing a " liberal and practical educa- 
tion that shall fit the industrial classes for the several 
pursuits and professions of life." So we would urge 
all who are seeking a broad, practical, scientific edu- 
cation to carefully examine the courses offered here 
as well as the equipment for instruction, and then 
decide whether they can do better than to enter the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. The examina- 
tions will be held this year at the Botanic Museum of 
the M. A. C. at 9 o'clock a. m., on Thursday and 
Friday, June 23 and 24, and also at the same time in 
Jacob Sleeper Hall, Boston University, 12 Somerset 
street, Boston ; and at Sedgwick Institute, Great Bar- 
rington, Mass. Two full days are required for exami- 
nation, and candidates must come prepared to stay 
that length of time. 



MAY FLOWERS. 

Zizia aurea, Koch. 

Fraxinus sambucifolia. Lam. Black ash. 

Acer spicatum. Lam. Mountain maple. 

Fagus ferruginea, Ait. American beech. 

Eriophorum vaginatum, L. Cotton-grass. 

Andromeda polifolia, L. Andromeda. 

Kalmia glauca. Ait. Pale laurel, Belchertown Pond. 

Lonicera caerulea, L. Mountain honeysuckle, Mt 

Holyoke. 
Alopecurus pratensis, L Meadow foxtail. 
Lonicera sempervirens. Ait. Trumpet honeysuckle, 

Pond in Plainville. 
Lonicera glanca. Hill. Honeysuckle. 
Lonicera ciliata, Muhl. Fly-honeysuckle. 
Chiogenes serpyllifolia, Salisb. Creeping snowberry. 

Mt. Toby. 
Rubus triflorus, Richardson. Dwarf raspberry. 
Trientalis Americana, Pursh. Star-flower. 
Sisyrinchium anceps, Cav. Blue-eyed grass. 
Comandra umbellata, Nutt. Bastard toad-flax. 
Hypoxis erecta, L. Star-grass. 
Pyrus arbutifolia, L. f. Choke berry. 
Buda rubra, Dumort. Sand-spurrey. 
Gaylussacia resinosa, Torr. and Gray. Huckleberry. 
Crataegus coccinea, L. White thorn. 
Rubus strigosus, Michx. Red raspberry. 
Aphyllon uniflorum. Gray. One-flowered cancer- root. 
Berberis vulgaris, L. Common barberry. 
Cypripedlum acaule. Ait. Stemless lady's slipper. 
Rhododendron nudiflorum, Torr. Swamp pink. 
Potentilla argentea, L. Silver cinquefoil. 
Qercus alba, L. White oak. 
Veronica arvensis, L. Corn speedwell. 
Castilleia coccinea, Spreng. Scarlet painted-cup. 
Juglans cinerea, L. Butternut. 

JUNE FLOWERS. 

Trifolium pratense, L. Red clover. 

Cypripedium parviflorum, Salish. Small yellow lady's 

slipper, Mt. Holyoke. 
Cypripedium pubescens, Willd. Large yellow lady's 

slipper, Mt. Toby. 
Pogonia verticillata, Nutt. Pogonia. 
Cornus Canadensis, L. Bunchberry. 
Malva rotundifolia, L. Common mallow. 
Achillea Millifolium, L. Common yarrow. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



171 



Carya alba, Nutt. Shag-bark hickory. 

Rubus villosus, Ait, High blackberry. 

Rubus occidentalis, L. Black raspberry. 

Iris versicolor, L. Blue flag. 

Quercus ilicifolia, Wang. Scrub oak. 

Ranunculus multifidus, Pursh. Buttercup. 

Cornus alternifolia, L. f. Cornel. 

Poa pratensis, L. June grass. 

Veratrum viride, Ait. Indian poke. 

Chrysanthemum Leucanthemum, L. Ox-eye daisy. 

Dactylis glomerata, L. Orchard grass. 

Podophyllum peltatum, L. Mandrake. 

Medeola Virginana L. Indian cucumber-root. 

Phleum pratense, L. Timothy. 

Viburnum Lentago, L. Sweet viburnum. 

Quercus coccinea, Wang., Var, tinctoria, Gray. Black 
oak. 

Smilax herbacea, L. Carrion flower. 

Rus Toxicodenron, L. Poison Ivy. 

Habenaria Hookeri, Torr. Habenaria. 

Solanum Dulcamara, L. Bittersweet. 

Myrica cerifera, L. Bayberry. Mt. Tobey. 

Alopecurus geniculatus, L. Var. aristulatus Torr, 
Floating foxtail grass. 

Gaylussacia frondosa, Torr. and Gray. Dangleberry. 

Viburnum acerifolium, L. Arrow- wood. 

Kalmia latifolia, L. Mountain laurel. 

Plantago lanceolata, L. Ribgrass. 

Festuca elatior, L. Meadow fescule. 

Kalmia a;ngusifolia, L; Sheep laurel. 

Sarracenia purpurea. L. Pitcher-plant. Belcher- 
town Pond. 



^S. 



MEDEA. 

The city was bathed in the sunshine of noonday as 
we entered the famous gallery of the Capitol to spend 
the afternoon among its rich stores of painted and 
sculptured beauty. We had been told of the treas- 
ures to be found there, and had entered with that feel- 
ing of exaltation which comes to all who are about 
to look upon the best the world can afford of art in the 
way of sculptured and painted story. A halo of fame 
and antiquity, hung about everything, and deeply 
impressed us as we walked through the large high- 
vaulted galleries. 



The earlier part of the afternoon we spent among 
the paintings. It was not until dusk had begun to 
settle that we made our way to the sculptured gal- 
leries. These we could not hope to do justice in the 
short time left us before dark, so said to my compan- 
ion : " We must come again, Guy ; I will not leave 
Rome till I have spent another day here." 

" Nor I, either," replied Guy, " let's stop now and 
leave the rest till next time." 

We accordingly started to leave the hall. To 
reach the door where we had entered, we were obliged 
to go through a number of galleries. As we passed a 
huge pillar, which supported one of the ponderous 
arches we came into a stronger light which came 
through a large window overhead. As I glanced 
round, my attention was arrested by a human figure — 
at least I would have sworn it was — -that of the hand- 
somest woman I had ever seen. She stood appar- 
ently about fifteen paces away. The light in which 
we stood illumined her whole form, but about and 
beyond her everything was gloom. 

" Look Guy I" I exclaimed, " is it human or divine ? 
— or Satanic," I added, as I caught a peculiar gleam 
in her eyes. But my companion did not answer. He 
stood transfixed, — and well he might — gazing in 
speechless admiration. 

She was a dark brunette, of Italian blood I thought, 
and of a mould in form and features that must have 
eclipsed all the marble beauties around her. Over 
her shoulders gracefully hung a loose-flowing waist, 
the sleeves of which, being caught up at the shoulders 
left bare the exquisitely rounded arms. The dress at 
the neck was open, disclosing the perfect contour of 
the shoulders ; and the face, — I never could do it jus- 
tice — chin moulded as though in marble ; and lips — 
well, were it not for those eyes which forbade even 
the thought of such freedom, one could not have 
resisted their invitation ; eyes deep, but not cavernous, 
large and lustrous, and shining with a facinating light 
— not a piercing brightness, not a serpentine gleam ; 
they bewitched you with their beauty, almost a gran- 
deur ; but there was an evil light in them which I did 
not like. Hanging over her shoulders in loose adorn- 
ment was a mass of chestnut hair. All this I had 
observed in much less time than it takes to tell it. I 
then glanced down her form. Her left hand grasped 
a curtain. Around her hips hung a loose garment of 



172 



ACjUiK JLiFli. 



dark cloth. Her left arm near the shoulder was 
encircled by a broad bracelet of gold. The right 
hand rested on the hip. But what was that gleaming 
thing she held in her hand. As it dawned upon me I 
gave a start and shuddered. The woman saw me. A 
bitter smile parted her lips revealing the shining teeth. 
Her eyes shot forth a wild and passionate gleam. At 
least, so it seemed to me, 1 involuntarily drew back 
dragging Guy with me. As I did so she vanished. 

Dragging Guy, who seemed too much astonished to 
move or speak, along with me, I hurried away. At 
the entrance I met a guide to whom I told my mys- 
tery. He laughed at me and said it must have been 
an illusion. This was too much for Guy. 

" Why man \" he burst forth, " I saw her with my 
own eyes. Do you tell me that I lie ? I saw the 
knife in her hand." 

The guide saw that we were in earnest, and seemed 
inclined to believe our story. Suddenly he began to 
smile, and then leaning back against the wall he 
laughed loud and long. As soon as we could get any- 
thing out of him, he said : " Oh ! I understand now. 
Didn't you see this woman just to the right of the 
entrance into the central gallery?" 

We said we did. 

"Well," he replied, " it's only a picture, on that 
was — 

" But," broke in Guy, " we saw her move way." 

" Wait just a minute," interrupted the guide, " and 
I will explain. It was a painting of Medea taken upon 
an upper gallery, and placed there for some reason or 
other preparatory to shipping it away." 

" But how do you account for her disappearance,'' 
I asked. 

" Oh, you could only see the picture when the light 
shown just right," he replied; -'when you moved 
away it was hidden from you and appeared to vanish." 

I looked at Guy and he looked at me. " Do you 
believe him ?" I asked. 

" Oh, I don't doubt his word," said Guy, " but I 
would have sworn it was a woman. I never was more 
completely deceived in all my life," 

Everett. 



WHY RAY HAMMOND WENT TO COLLEGE. 

" Why don't you go to college, Ray ? " You are pre- 
pared, aren't you ? The questioner was a pretty 



brown-eyed, happy-faced girl who had, though not 
from necessity, taken up the fascinating occupation of 
teaching Young America the rudiments of learning in 
a rural district among the hills, many miles removed 
from her native Boston. 

At first she had taken the school to relieve her 
friend, the regular teacher, who had been suddenly 
taken ill. At the end of a week she had liked it so 
well that she agreed to finish the term ; and then, as 
Miss Mason was unable to resume her duties, she had 
concluded to stay the remainder of the year. Her 
labors were light and agreeable ; she boarded with a 
family of very pleasant people who tried to make a 
quiet country life as -enjoyable as possible ; and so, as 
she was a great lover of nature and the country, she 
not only managed to exist, but really, before the year 
was out, had come to look upon the life of a country 
school-teacher as a very useful and congenial, if not 
an ideal one. Therefore, when the committee re- 
quested her to stay a second year, she graciously 
accepted. 

She was now spending her long summer vacation 
in the quiet, cool, old town in preference to any fash- 
ionable crowded resort, although she had been strongly 
urged to join a party of her city friends who were 
going to the sea-shore, and later to the mountains. 
She had become greatly interested in making a bot- 
anical collection, which was to include all the species 
to be found in that vicinity, and that was just the time 
of year to procure what she had not already collected, 
so she decided to remain. 

Perhaps another reason for her staying was in the 
acquaintances and associations she had formed. She 
was always a prime favorite wherever she went as she 
was of a remarkably happy, sympathetic temperament, 
always ready to do what she could to help, or please 
others, and to assist in any good work. So, during 
the year and more that she had been there, she had 
become thoroughly assimilated and identified with the 
social life and work of the place. 

One of the first people she had met on her advent 
in the town as a ''summer boarder," was a young 
man named Ray Hammond. He lived but a short 
distance from her boarding-place, so from the first 
they were a good deal in each others society. Both 
sang in the Village choir ; both were active workers 
in several of the same local organizations ; and both 



AGGIE LIFE. 



173 



took an active interest in the social events of the 
place. 

Congenial spirits usually seek each other out, in 
any case ; and in this one, apparently, these two had 
become congenial in a superlative degree ; for it was 
rare of late, to see one at an evening's entertainment 
of any sort without the other. Gradually they had 
become firm friends ; and now it was quite generally 
hinted among the local gossips that a speedy match 
was probable. And of late too, the other young men 
of the town had come to look on Ray as the winner 
in the race for the favors of the little Boston beauty. 
But both the principals in the case were, apparently at 
least, totally unconscious of any such state of affairs. 
They were such good friends that neither had desired 
anything but friendship. But there comes a turning- 
point in every life. And it came to these two quite 
unexpectedly. 

The neighbors all agreed that Ray was different 
from the other young men, —and it didn't require any 
great perception to see it either. As a boy he had 
been first and foremost in all boyish pranks and mis- 
chief ; from transferring of old bachelor Jarvis's hens 
from their roost to their owner's pantry, to fastening 
the end of Storekeeper Gilbert's ball of twine to 
Farmer Hall's wagon wheel so that it would wind off 
onto the hub ; and taking down a gap in the fence 
between Neighbor Holt and Neighbor Jackson's pas- 
tures and letting their very similar flocks of South- 
downs together. '• Who did it ? " " Oh ! 1 guess 
Ray could tell you something about it." 

After exhausting the limited educational facilities 
of his native town he had gone away to an academy 
for two or three years. In place of the mischievous, 
reckless boy, there had come back the steady, earnest, 
upright young man, who, more than ever, had become 
the pride and comfort of Grandpa and Grandma Ham- 
mond, with whom he had lived from infancy, his 
father having been suddenly taken away before his 
birth, and his mother soon after it. His grandpar- 
ents had always cared for him as tenderly and loved 
him as fondly as though he had been their own and 
only son. And now he was beginning to repay in a 
measure, their devotion. For some three or four 
years he had manifested no disposition to leave home ; 
and it was generally understood that he was to stay 
and be the support and comfort of their old age. 



Gradually he had taken almost the entire manage- 
ment of the old farm off his grandfather's hands and 
had made it pay as it had not for many a day. And 
he had rapidly become a prime factor in neighborhood 
and township affairs, so that now he was considered 
by the wise ones as one of the coming men. He 
seemed singularly well fitted for public life, being 
gifted with keen perception, sound judgment, ready 
wit, and facile tongue ; but he realized that he was at 
a disadvantage in not having a broader, more com- 
prehensive education. 

Miss Mildred had found him ever an agreeable and 
interesting companion. But of late she had been 
growing ambitious for her friend. She realized his 
capabilities and also the narrow field at' was open 
for him in his native town. At last she had resolved 
to speak to him and induce him, if possible, to leave 
there and put him.self in the way of well-deserved 
advancement. It w as on the occasion of one of their 
numerous moonlight rides behind his favorite chestnut 
mare. Frisky, that she had begun the' conversation, 
the conclusion of which we are about to learn. 

She had obtained the floor, so to speak, and had 
gone over it all with him, rapidly and enthusiastically, 
his talents, his capabilities, his restrictions ; and had 
finally ended up with the question which begins our 
sketch. He had been rather indifferent at first, but 
gradually had become interested, though it must be 
confessed, it was more in the speaker than in the sub- 
ject. Finally he had become almost convinced by 
the earnestness and plausibility of her arguments. 

" Why don't I go to college, Mildred? " "Why, 
yes, I suppose I'm prepared," — repeating her first 
question and answering the last. " But what would 
grandfather do without me, now?" "He leaves 
about everything to me to look after, and doesn't like 
to be bothered with any business at all. I'm afraid it 
will be impossible." Whereupon, Mildred returned 
to the charge, inventing with her woman's wit, many 
solutions to the problem. At last she paused to take 
breath, and he resumed, — " Really, I haven't as much 
education as I ought to have in order to make the 
most of myself. I've realized it for some time : but 
since I met — but — since — since last summer, — I 
have had it brought home to me more often and more 
forcibly than ever before." Then the subject seemed 
to strike him in a new light. " So you really think I 



174 



AGGIE LIFE. 



ought to go to college do you ? " "1 didn't suppose 
you took enough interest in me to care whether I 
ever made anything, or not." He was getting a little 
confused, talking with this girl with whom he had 
always before been at perfect ease. He felt it and 
thought, " This will not do, I must keep my wits 
about me, or I shall be saying something I don't want 
to just now." 

She saw his slight embarrassment and hastened to 
reply, " Of course I care, Ray. I certainly think you 
ought to go to college if you possibly can. And I 
don't see any reason why you can't. You have the 
making of a — I don't say this to flatter you, Ray, but 
I think you have the making of a great man in you, if 
you will only get away from this poky little place 
where you will have a chance to rise in the world. 
You can surely manage some way. There are half a 
dozen colleges within half a day's ride of here so you 
could come home often and see to the farm, and you 
can be here vacations, and — and — I wish, Ray, you 
would go." She in her turn was getting a little em- 
barassed. Perhaps she had said too much. Per- 
haps he would misinterpret her motive. 

By this time Ray had fully recovered himself. He 
began to smile a little at his companion's sudden con- 
clusion of her speech. Thinking to tease her a little 
by way of variety, he said, " Do you want to get rid 
of me so much then ? I had hoped that my society 
was not so unpleasant as to cause you to wish to ban- 
ish me from your presence entirely." 

"Ray!" reproachfully' "You know that is not the 
reason I wish you to go," — a little provoked and hurt 
by his willful misconception. ' You and I have been 
too good friends for me to send you away, or for you 
to think that I would, either." 

Realizing that his words had cut deeper than he 
had intended, and, moreover, that the fair pleader at 
his side was something more than a friend to him, 
and encouraged by her impulsiveness, he mad e a sud- 
den tack and veered round on a different course. 

" Mildred," — all his lightness gone in an instant, — 
" Mildred, are we always to be just friends, and noth- 
ing more, or are we to be something nearer and 
dearer ? " He had slipped his arm around the yield- 
ing form and drawn it close. There was a long 
pause, broken only by a smothered sigh from the 
happy girl at his side and by Frisky's hoof-beats and 



the grinding of the wheels on the hard gravel. 

" Milly, my darling, if I'll promise to go to college 
will you promise me, when I shall have graduated, 
with the most precious prize any man could ask — 
with your own sweet self? " As he spoke the pretty 
brown head sank shyly against his shoulder, and the 
blushing face was hid for a moment. 

Then the softly whispered " yes " and the smiling 
lips upturned to meet his own, — was not that answer 
enough to the query, " Why did Ray Hammond 
go to College ? " 

WHAT ARE THE WILD WAVES SAYING. 

What are the wild waves saying, sister, 

Repeating o'er and o'er. 
As they rolling, tumbling, tossing. 

Ever break upon the shore. 
Are they singing songs of anguish, 

Sad dirges to the dead, 
Or with voices loud triumphant, 

Songs of victory instead ? 
Do those angry, roaring breakers, 

Dashing sullen on the sand. 
Tell of safety, peace, contentment. 

On the billows far from land ? 
Do they tell of many vessels 

Tossing on the raging sea. 
Almost helpless, broken, useless 

Longing ever, Land, for thee. 

Sister, the wild waves are telling 

Stories, Oh, so very true ! 
Of the hidden baffling dangers, 

Of temptations ever new. 
They are warning us, my sister, 

Of the evils in our ways, 
Telling us that righteous toiling 

Leads to peaceful happy days. 

^ 

WAR. 
Sometimes I weally think I'll go and fight 
Those howwid beastly Spaniards, don't you know. 
And lay a couple hundwed of them low 
Beneath the pale moon's undulating light, 
I think 'twould weally be a chawming sight 
To see them laid out nicely in a wow 
All weady for the coroner, and so 
I'm deucedly good mind to start to-night. 
But stay I just let me think , what shall I weah 
That best will suit my physique on the woad ? 
Of course I'll want a gawment a la mode 
In Spain, as we will pwobably go theah 
Oh deah ! 'tis such an awful ways to woam 
I think, by Jove, I'd better stay at home. 

— University Cynic, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



175 



[3d^seball. 



Maine University, 8 ; Aggie, 7. 
The Maine University team played here Wednes- 
day, May 18 and defeated the home team, 8-7. It 
was a very interesting game and the outcome was 
constantly in doubt until the last man was put out. 
Our errors proved very costly. The visiting team 
was evidently the strongest that Maine has produced 
for many years. The game would probably have been 
different had not a passing carriage interferred with 
the ball. During the latter part of the contest matters 
proved exciting, honors being evenly distributed until 
the ninth inning when Maine won out by a run. For 
the visitors Palmer and Welch play well in the field. 
For the home team Hinds batted well while Eaton 
pitched a fine game striking out eight men. The fol- 
lowing is the score : 



Pretto, s.s. 
Palmer, l.f. 
Dolley, 3b. 
Small, lb. 
Welch, 2b. 
Braun, m. 
Clark, c. 
Sprague, r.f. 
Drew, p. 
Gushman, p. 

Totals, 



Warden, 3b. 
Craves, lb 
Hooker, m. 
Hinds, l.f. 
Ahearn, s.s. 
Crowell. c, 
Eaton, p. 
Halligan, p. 
Dorman, r.f. 
Paul, 2b. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE. 
R. 

1 
2 

1 
1 

2 

1 







10 
5 
1 
3 






8 


9 


27 


14 


4 


R. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 





1 


4 


3 


2 








7 





2 


1 


1 











2 


4 


2 











1 





2 


2 


1 


1 


11 


3 




















1 





1 








1 





2 





1 



27 
7 
1 
1 



8 9 
2—8 
1—7 
First base 



Totals, 7 

Innings, 12 3 4 5 

University of Maine, 2 10 2 
Aggie, 3 

Times at bat— Maine 39, Aggie 38. Twobase hit— Warden, 
on balls— off Drew 5, off Eaton 5. Struck out— by Drew 6, by Cushman 1 , 
by Eaton 8. Double play — Dorman and Crowell. Passed ball— Crowell. 
Time — 2 h. 30 m, Umpire — Kinney of Amherst. 

WiLLiSTON, 7 ; Aggie, 4. 
Our team met another defeat on Saturday, May 
21, from an old rival, the Williston Seminary baseball 
team. The game was very slow throughout. Although 
Williston made but four hits to our eight they suc- 
ceeded in bunching their hits when hits meant runs. 
Had the team played half as good a game as they 
did on the previous Wednesday they would have won 
easily. The errors proved very costly. Williston earned 



only three of her runs. In the fourth inning the visit- 
ing team made four runs on two bases on balls, two 
errors, and a two base hit. The double play by West- 
cott, Casey, and Maddox was very pretty. For Wil- 
liston the playing of Roberts and Casey were the fea- 
tures, while for Aggie the battery excelled. The 
score is as follows : 



WILLISTON. 



Roberts, 3b. 
Westcott, 2b. 
Hull, l.f. 
Maddox, lb. 
Goodrich, c.f. 
Casey, s.s. 
Keedy, r.f. 
Ely, p. 
Pond, c. 



A.B. 

4 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 
4 
2 



P.O. 

3 
2 
1 
11 
1 
3 
3 
1 
2 



Totals, 


37 

AGGIE. 


7 


4 


27 


11 


5 




A.B, 


R. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Warden, 3b. 


4 


2 





3 


1 


2 


Dorman, r.f. 


4 





1 


1 





1 


Hooker, c.f. 


4 


1 


2 


2 








Hinds, l.f. 


4 





2 


2 








Ahearn, s.s. 


4 








1 


2 


1 


Crowell, c. 


4 


1 


2 


4 


J 





Eaton, p. 


5 











3 


1 


Graves, lb. 


4 





1 


11 





3 


Paul, 2b. 


2 








1 


1 


1 


Halligan, 2b. 


2 








2 


1 






Innings, 
Williston, 
Aggie, 



36 
3 


1 



27 
7 





9 
9 

1—7 
1—4 



•Stolen bases— Hull. Ely and Pond 2, Roberts, Goodrich, Casey. Warden, 
Dorman, Graves. Two-base hits — Keedy Hinds. First base on balls — off 
Eaton 3, off Ely 1. Left on bases — Williston 8, Aggie 6. Struck out — by. 
Eaton 5, by Ely 1. Batters hit — Casey, Pond. Double plays — Wescott, 
Casey and Maddox. Passed balls — Pond, Crowell. Time — 2 h. 15 m. 
Umpires — Brockenheimer and Turner. 

THROUGH THE SPECTATOR'S GL&SSES. 



The value of athletics lies not so much in the num- 
ber of victories won as in the general development, 
both physical and mental, of the contesting parties. 
The chances of success in any given contest may 
often be reckoned regardless of the better team. The 
element of chance often plays so important a part 
that it must be reckoned with when the sum total is 
desired. 

The advantages of good training and conscientious 
practice are not to be under-estimated, but the individ- 
ual excellence should be subordinated to the com- 
plete harmonious working of the whole. Aside from 
track athletics, there is hardly a sport that does not 
demand perfect team work for the success of the 
striving parties. Individual playing is a feature that 
is so brilliant that it often blinds the eyes of the spec- 
tator until he awakes and finds that the slow plodding, 
steady, closely compact team has won away from his 



X76 



AGGIE LIFE. 



favorites. The playing to the grand-stand is just as 
reprehensible as is the "acting to the boxes" upon the 
stage : neither is good art : both tend to lessen the 
general good effect. 

There is, undoubtedly, a great disheartenment in 
successive defeats, and the best of teams is bound to 
feel its influence, but it is just this factor of discon- 
tent that the captain should fight against. The only 
way to win ball games is to play ball. 

It is exceedingly unfortunate that the college should 
be so placed that a nine is formed with difficulty from 
a lack of good material. The feeling that a player 
often has that even if he does poorly his place cannot 
be filled owing to there being no competent person to 
fill it, is conducive always to slack play and feeble 
interest in the game. It would be much better in 
many cases that the nine be abolished than that this 
feeling should predominate. Again, it would often be 
better for the morale of the team to put an inferior but 
enthusiastic player in the position of a good but lazy 
one. 

The need of our team is more team practice. Not 
necessarily practice that involves the use of a second 
nine, but practice, continual and incessant, in those 
points that have been proven to be of moment. Train- 
ing for ball playing is just as essential as is training 
for the Olympic games. One cannot be a good ball 
player unless he keep fit and trim. 

Those valuable points such as base running, should 
be taught better and more thoroughly. Hours should 
be given to the perfection of this art, The finer points 
of the game should be thoroughly studied by each 
man on the nine. Thorough practice should be had 
in different departments and the labor should be kept 
up until the novice is proficient. The only way a 
vaulter is enabled to reach eleven feet or more is by 
starting at eight, then nine, and so on until the high- 
water mark is reached. Then the athlete does not 
desist, but he struggles valiantly until he knows he can 
make it, regardless of wind and temperature. 

It should be the same in baseball. The nine should 
not be allowed to continually change from one line of 
work to another, but should be kept at, say, throwing 
to bases until is is certain that there is little chance 
of error. In this lies the secret of success : in this 
lies victory, — careful training and accurate work. 

Another and important point might be impressed 



upon every man, and that is, a thorough knowledge of 
the rules of the game. There should be no half-way 
house in this. When a question arises that comes 
solely under ground rules that should have been made 
before the game, there would be no effort made to 
impose upon the umpire. There seems to be a 
lamentable lack of knowledge of the simplest rules 
among the participa nts and this had led to an unfort- 
unate selection in regard to points to be debated. 

The Spectator witnessed a college game a short 
time ago that was umpired by one of New York's old 
players. After the usual wrangling of college games, 
this one was a revelation. The umpire at once show- 
ed himself to be the master, and from the time the 
first ball was pitched until the fourteenth inning when 
the winning run was made, there was not a moment 
of doubt as to who was managing that game. Every- 
thing went off as smoothly as clock work. There 
were close decisions, very close indeed, but one and 
all felt and knew that that qiiiet unassuming man in 
blue serge was on the spot and knew just what had 
happened, how it happened and when it happened. 

Of course the average collegian cannot expect to 
equal Mr. O'Rourke in judgment or knowledge of 
the game, but he can at least perfect himself in the 
rules and do his best. That essential which seems 
lacking in the average collegiate umpire is a thorough 
grasp of the situation and a mastery of it. From the 
moment that he takes his position behind the pitcher 
he should make the players feel that he is playing the 
game, that the work is to be done rapidly and quietly, 
and that his word is law. 

He can only do this by inspiring a feeling of trust 
and respect, and that can be most easily gained by 
displaying a thorough knowledge of the field rules, a 
quick judgment and a prompt and decisive decision. 

The working of a team is always bettered when its 
captain has a complete control, and that officer should 
learn not to make any unnecessary delay by useless 
objections. There should be a distinct understanding 
that the captain is the one to make any remonstrance 
and not any fielder who is pleased to do so. 

Coaching on the lines is a necessary evil and has 
often been carried so far, especially in professional 
leagues, that laws have had to be made to restrict its 
use. It is, of course, essential, but it should be con- 
ducted in a gentle manly manner and not in a way 



AGGIE LIFE. 



177 



that savors of Bowery usage. The so called "rattling" 
of the opposing pitcher may be all very amusing and 
also indulged by nearly every team but it is to be 
regretted that it is ever necessary. It is not a sports- 
manlike method of proceedure. The pitcher has strain 
enough without being made the butt of silly ribaldy. 

The lack of a true sportsmanlike action has often 
ruined a game to the spectator, and causes the 
bleachers to act in manners unbecoming gentlemen. 
No interest in the game would be lost by a quiet dig- 
nified procedure ; if baseball is dependent upon the 
antics of the usual rooters for its success, then we 
had better abolish it as our national sport. 

The Spectator. 



^olle^f ^otfs- 



— Rain, Rain, Rain, Rain! 
— Three weeks more before commencement. 
— M. H. Pingree has been ill for the past few days. 
— Lieut. Wright has been promoted to the rank of 
captain. 

— Jones '01 has been absent from college on 
account of sickness. 

— Prof. Charles H. Fernald addressed a meeting at 
the Methodist church last Sunday evening. 

— Monday, the 30th, Memorial-day, being a legal 
holiday, no exercises were held at the college. 

— Mr. C. D. Woods, professor of Agriculture at the 
University of Maine, recently visited the college. 

— C. M. Walker and H. E. Maynard of the junior 
class recently took a wheeling trip to New Haven, Ct. 

— The President gave a reception to the commit- 
tees from the legislature, Tuesday evening, the 24th. 

— Students receiving The Voice are cautioned to 
send the postmaster notice, if the publication is not 
wanted. 

— The college was visited by members of the 
" Headmasters' Club " of Massachusetts last Satur- 
day morning. 

— No chapel exercises were held in the chapel Sun- 
day, May 29. The students were invited to attend 
service at the North Amherst church where Rev. 
Mr. Gaylord, delived the annual address before the 
local post of G. A, R. 



— Mr. Waugh, the professor of Botany in the Ver- 
mont University, at Burlington, has been the guest of 
Prof. Maynard. 

— Prof. Tower, professor of Agriculture at the 
Michigan Agricultural College, spent a few days at the 
college last week. 

— The Flint prize speaking will be held Tuesday 
afternoon of Commencement week instead of Monday 
as has been the custom. 

— -No exercises were held at the college on the 
morning of Wednesday last, as the college was 
inspected by committees from the legislature. 

— Saturday, June 4, we play Williston at East- 
hampton The nine is going over to win and a large 
delegation should accompany them and back up the 
players, 

— The college nine has been greatly handicapped 
by the loss of Pitcher Halligan, who recently strained 
the muscles of his arm, which prevents him from 
playing. 

— H. W. Dana '99 is he owner of a new Keating 
wheel. He received this as a prize from the King 
Richardson Co. of Springfield, of whom he is an 
agent. 

— The following men from the sophomore class 
have been selected to speak for the Burnham prize : 
Howard Baker, C. A. Crowell, J. W. Kellogg, F. G. 
Stanley. Substitutes, A. C. Monahan and F. A. 
Merrill. 

— At the recent meet between Amherst, Dart- 
mouth, Wesleyan and some other colleges, Hulburt 
of Wesleyan, broke the world's record in pole-vaulting. 
His wonderful record is 11 ft. 6 1-2 in. 

— The annual students' conference, held at North- 
field, will be in session from July 1 to the 10th. Del- 
egates from the college Y. M, C. A. will be present 
and it is hoped that many other students will attend 
this meeting. 

— The annual spring mountain-day for the fresh- 
man class will come next Monday. The class, with 
Prof. Kinney in charge, will drive in barges to the 
Notch in the mountains, and from there go on foot in 
search of botany specimens. This will probably be 
the last botanizing trip the class will take together this 
term. 



178 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The meeting of the Headmasters' Club of 
Massachusetts was held at Amherst June 3 and 4. 
At this meeting Prof. Charles Wellington addressed 
the club on " A Phase of State Education," and Prof. 
Mills spoke on " Carrying Over." 

— The three committees from the legislature, which 
yearly visit the college, arrived in town, Tuesday, 
the 24th. The committees represented were the 
committee on Military, the committee on Agricul- 
ture and the committee on Education. 

— A quartette has been formed in college which 
has been under the efficient training of Mrs. Sander- 
son, and will sing upon Commencement Sunday. The 
college choir has been practicing faithfully, having two 
rehearsals a week, and has shown much improvement. 

— A course of reading upon Scott's " Heart of 
Midlothian," Shakespeare's '- Macbeth," and Kings- 
ley's " Westward HO," has been assigned to the 
junior class by Prof. Mills. There is to be an exami- 
nation upon the reading, sometime near the close of 
the term. 

— At the preliminary speaking held Friday, May 
21, the following men from the freshman class were 
selected to take part in the Burnham prize speaking : 
G. R. Bridgeforth, W. S. Dickerman, H. T. Moulton, 
A. C. Wilson. Substitutes, Thaddeus Graves and C. 
L. Rice. 

— The Y. M. C. A. was addressed at their last 
meeting by Mr. Brownell Gage, a member of the 
senior class of Yale University. Mr. Gage, who has 
been speaking among all the prominent colleges, took 
for his subject, " The Work at Northfield " and was 
listened to with much interest. 

— We are glad to see that the seniors have at last 
started their flower-bed. They were rather slow in 
making preparations for it as the chairman was called 
home just when arrangements were nearing comple- 
tion. This flower-bed, which is in front of South 
College, is always one of the prettiest spots about the 
college during the spring and summer, and always 
attracts much attention at Commencement time. 
Ninety-eight's bed is of a unique design and certainly 
does credit to the class and the committee who 
designed it. 

— A word may be fitly spoken concerning the course 
in drawing at the college as given to the two lower 



classes. The recitation room, which is in the old 
chapel building is fitted up with models of all kinds, 
and specimens of the students' work may be seen upon 
the walls. The course has proved very attractive and 
much interest has been shown by the students in that 
line. The classes are under the charge of Wm. H. 
Armstrong '99, who deserves much credit for the suc- 
cess of this department. The recitation-room is open 
to visitors and any one going through the laboratory 
should not miss the opportunity of stepping in and 
examining the work done by the students in drawing. 

— Last fall the upper classmen were very strenuous 
in calling the freshmen " dead slow " because they 
did not accept the challenges of the sophomore class, 
to several athletic contests, the moment they were 
posted. Last week the freshman posted a challenge 
to the sophomores for a baseball game. It remained 
unaccepted for several days. Then some one wrote 
" accepted" on it, but signed no name, and put up a 
mock-list of the sophomore team. This of course 
was not recognized by the freshmen and this challenge 
remained on the bulletin-board for one or two days 
more, then some one tore it down. Last fall the 
freshmen were told that these athletic contests 
between the lower classes were college customs. If 
this is so why should this one be allowed to pass by 
through the negligence of one of the classes. It is, 
perhaps, a good thing to keep up the rivalry between 
these classes, and we all want to see the ball game. 



THE CLASS ('01) NAUGHTY ONE. 
The fate that waits the Freshies, 
We're anxious now to learn ; 
For Satan will not have them. 
Since they are to green too burn. 

They cannot go to heaven, 

Though their virtues weigh a ton, 

For there's no room on the golden shore 

For any "naughty ones." 

Oh, their case is now a sad one. 
We are sorry to admit 
Only time can dry their greenness. 
And it again can nit. 

— High School Gleaner. 

^ 

You never hear the bee complain, 

Nor hear it weep or wail, 
But if it wish, it can unfold 

A very painful tale. 

— Hi§h School Item. 



AGGiE JLIFE 



179 



umni. 



As we glance through the lists of alumni notes we 
can but notice what a large number of our College 
men are making use of the military training received 
at " Aggie," and are showing their characteristic loy- 
alty to college, state and country by volunteering. 
Several of our undergraduates, as volunteers, are 
already at their posts of duty, and we can safely say. 
there will be many others when the time shall come. 

'89. — William N. Folman, United States navy, 
assigned to duty in Coast Signal service. Cape Eliza- 
beth Station, Bowery Beach, P. 0., Me. 

'90. — F. J. Smith has returned to Maiden after 
spending a week at the laboratory in Amherst. 

'93. — George F. Curley. Physician, Milford, Mass. 

'95.— The marriage of W. A. Root to Miss Anna 
Wight is announced to take place at Deerfield, Mass. 
this evening June 1 , to be followed by a reception. 

'96. — Reunion. There promises to be a large del- 
egation present from '96 at the first annual reunion of 
the class at commencement, 

'96, — M. E. Sellew was in town last week. His 
address for the present is. East Longmeadow, Moss. 

'96 — F. H. Read is spending a few days in Am- 
herst. 

'96, — F. E. DeLuce has joined Co. G. 22nd Regt, 
Camp Black, Long Island. 

'96. — W. B. Harper, Princ musician, 2nd Reg't, 
Virginia volunteers. 

'96. — H. F. Edwards is now with the Boston Book 
Store, Park St., Boston. 

'98, — Seijiro Saito. Word has been received by 
B. K. Jones, secretary of the class of '96, that Seijiro 
Saito left for Japan some months ago. 

'96. — B. K. Jones has been elected to the chair of 
Agriculture and Chemistry at the North Carolina 
Agricultural and Mechanical college, Raleigh, N. C. 
Mr. Jones, however, has not as yet accepted the 
position. 

'97. — C. A. Peters who has been assistant to Dr. 
Wellington at the Chemical Laboratory since gradua- 
ting, has recently been awarded a scholarship in the 
graduate school of Yale University. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Defence and Attack of Positions and Localities by 
Colonel H. Schaw. Lectures originally addressed to 
officers studying at Staff College. 

Manual of Military Field Engineering by Capt. Wm. 
D. Beach. 

Manual of Guard Duty for the Regular Army, Volun- 
teers, and Militia of the United States by Lieut. James 
Regan. 

A Text-book of Entomology. Packard. Library 
number, 595 — 530. A new text-book of Entomology 
by Professor A. S. Packard, of Brown University, 
formerly lecturer in Entomology at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, has just been issued and will 
prove an invaluable addition to the literature of this 
subject. Thus far almost all Entomological works, 
while giving a few chapters on the anatomy and physi- 
ology of insects, have concerned themselves with the 
habits, life histories and economy, or they have been 
mere enumerations of species. Hence it is that the 
insect morphologist has had to wade thrpugh oceans 
of literature, in several languages, often so hidden 
away in the proceedings of various societies or in 
technical magazines as to make it well nigh impossible 
to arrive at results without labor out of all proportion 
to the information obtained. Such a worker will hail 
with delight this admirable work well nigh unique in 
its scope. It covers, as its full title indicates, anat- 
omy, physiology, embryology, and metamorphosis ; its 
arrangement is logical ; its facts put clearly and in a 
forcible manner ; its illustrations abundant and excel- 
lently chosen. At the end of every section which 
treats of a separate topic a full bibliography is given, 
enabling the reader to verify statements and to go 
still further into a given subject should he so desire. 
The book is gotten up with Macmillan's characteristic 
excellence. 



£:)ScKe^ri:^es. 



Percey : — "I hear Jack got hurt today." 
Harold: — "How's that" 
Percey : — " Got caught in a belt." 
Harold :— "Where ?" 

Percey: — "On the back stairs, Sunday eve. 
Lynn High School Gazette, 



i8o 



AGGIE LiFE„ 



" Chief Umvoti," a story from The Oracle did much 
to make its issue attractive. 

A Football Story, from the same issue is good 
though a little out of season. 

If an article is worth copying and placing in an 
exchange column, is it not only fair that the name of 
the paper from which it was taken should be given 
credit for it ? 

" Inklings " from the Mount Holyoke are among the 
choicest bits of truth that one can read. 

We are glad to be able to speak a good word for 
the High School Record. 

The Western was a welcome exchange this month. 
This and similar publications only emphasize the fact 
the woman of the coming century is to be a strong 
factor in the intellectual world. And it will be as it 
should be. 

We congratulate the Columbian Call on the story 
which appeared in the columns of its last issue under 
the title of "Coward or Not." It was interesting. 

The Exchange Column of the Steele Review is 
first rate. 

Latin pupil : Hominy is the food for man. 
Friend : How do you know ? 

Latin pupil: I read in a book that homo is man, 
hominis is of man, and homini for man. — 77?^ Distaff. 

Miss P. — " Why is a potato like a gatepost ? " 
Chorus — " Give up." 

Miss P, — " Put in the ground and it will propagate." 

— T}]e Earlhamite. 

Someone has said time's money — anyhow times 
change. — Epsilon. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



The Horace Partridge Co., 

Athl etic Outfi tters. 

Track., Dia7no7id, Gridiron, Link avcd 
Court Supplies. 

College and School Team orders our Speci:iliy. 



BB and B7 Hanover Street, - - - 
Catalogues free. 



jBosrO'y, MASS. 



Practical Horseshoer, 

Rear of Purity Bakery, 
AMHERST, MASS. 

g^^Best of work guaranteed. .^c^^ 



(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 



HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. 



m^iW^^MW^^^M 



isIIasi»J^if^J.BeIffIf?Bi 



TH5 EMBOD/MEN T OF 



wM^ir^mMi0jr*'^f3am^sm^ 



yfmmW' 



ftp ^ P-MGHStRUdlON 



lyyifciANiSM. 






^sa^iCSf^^ 



AGGiE LIFE. 




Consider— if yon can keep the wet out 
of your rifle it will not rustnoifreeze. Only 

Marlin Repeaters 

have Solid Tops, shedding water like a 
duck's back. Our 197-page book (just out) 
tells all about them. Up-to-date infor- 
mation about powders,black and smoke- 
less; proper sizes. Quantities, how to 
load ; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, 
jacketedi soft-nosed, mushroom,] etc.: 
trajectories, Telocities,penetration3. All 
calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and i 
r, , 1,000 other things, including many trade I 
!y k secrets never before given to the public. ' 
^^'\ Free if you will send stamps for postage to 
<' The Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Lovelly 

The Photographer , 

To the class of '97 M. A. C. MAKES A SPECIALTY 
OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 

E^K. BENNETT. 

Jeweler, 
Optician, 
Watchmakei . 

KIRST DOOK FROM POST OFFICE. 

FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED 



Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
specUxl notiMy without c harg e, in the 

Scientific JIntericam 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. liargest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 s 
year ; four months, fl. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co.36^Broadway, New York 

Braneb Office. 626 F St., Washington, D. C. 



OFFICE OF 

B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 






AMHa$T, aa$$. 



SCHXKXARE'S 

PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 

A., J. ®OH:iI-,'I-,^>A.EeE5, 

108 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



HEADQUA RTERS FOR ABSiE STUDENTS. 

HAIR DRESSING ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONBO, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



L. W. GIBBS & CO., 

James B. Stintson, Manager, 

CLOTHIERS and FURNISHERS. 

ALL thp: new things in 

NECKWEAR, HATS AND CAPS, 
GOLF SUITS, &c. 



Cook's Block, 



Amliersl, Mass. 



:E=:E3:..^i^i^vd:.^i.ciST. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night callo responded to at residence, first door 
■west of Chase's Block. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

«Co-Operati¥e Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovatii Establisliment, 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

Office : 
Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 




(HatehmakeF and Optician. 

Prompt skillful attention given to all fine 
and complicated watchwork. 




Tlie Leading Piiotograplier 



^-«L 



i»— s 



OF WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS. 
Work Guaranteed or money refunded. Give us a trial. 



102 Main St., opp. Court House, 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



IXT. IW, BOITNTON, 

manufacturer of 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



E. B. SICKINSDN, h. h. s. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

S TO 12 yv. 3Vn., 1-30 TO 5 F. -hJL. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



Its' Repairing done tvhile you 'wait,.^([ 
2 PMiENlX JtOW. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY AND FEED STABLE, 

T. L. FAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BA.RGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMITT STREET, AMHERST, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. 8. GA'iES, D. D. S. 

hi N^. BROWN^, D. D. 8. 



DENTISTS 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

KANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 



STEAM AKD HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 




(Dassaehasetts flgpieultaPal College. 

AT THE 

OOLiLTlGB FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 



J 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



LEMUEL SEARS & CO., 

WliolBsale aqil Belall Grocers, 



Lemuel Sears. 
Henrt G. Sears. 



20 and 22 DWIGHT STREET, 
28 RACE STREET, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 



R. r. Kelton. 



D. B. Kblton. 



R. F. KELION & CO., 

dealers in 

Fresh and Salt Meats, 



POULTRY, YEGETHBLES, FISJ (P OYSTERS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note IJooks, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 



AMHE RST H OUSE 

FIRST-CLAS S IN EVERY P ARTICULAR. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Manager. 




We will sell you a good Standard Second-hand Typewriter for $2^.00. 

Write for full particulars to 



CUTTEIR TOWEIR CO., 



12 A. Milk Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Established 1845. Tel. 2423. 




ty^i 



T 



BICYCLES. 



^^■ti Among the improvements for 1898 are full flush joints, internal seat post and handle (^?)» 

f5?)))S) l^ar post fastenings, self-oiling bearings, low frames and low crank hanger drop, nar- 1^^ 

^^^ row tread, new style handle bars, the most perfect crank hanger mechanism in ^ 

WmW) existence 






Stearns Chainless 


$125.00 


Stearns Specials 


75.00 


Stearns Yellow Fellows 


50.00 


Stearns Tandems 


100.00 






Write now for handsome illustrated catalogue, free on application. 



m B. C. STEARNS & CO., SYRAOUSB, 



Y ■ 




VOL. VIII. 



AMHERST. MASS., JUNE 21, 1898 



NO. 15 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications stiould be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, IVIass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

WARREN ELMER HINDS, '99, Editor-in- 3hief. 

FREDERICK HARVEY TURNER, '99, Business Manager. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Ass't Business Manager. 
CHARLES MOREHOUSE WALKER, '99, College Notes. WILLIAM ANSON HOOKER, '99. Alumni. 

BERNARD HOWARD SMITH. '99. Libriry Notes. FREDERIC AUGUSTUS MERRILL. 'OO, Through the Spectators Classes. 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS CROWELL, '00, Exchange. JAMES EDWARD HALLIGAN, '00, Athletics. 

ALLISON RICE DORMAN, '01. ALEXANDER CAVASSA WILSON, '01, 

Terms: $1.00 per year in advance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 2Sc. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Hinds, Pres. Athletic Association, 

G. F. Parmenter, Manager. Base-Ball Association. 

W. R. Crowell, Sec. Reading-Room Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Index, . . . . F. A. Merrill,' Manager. 



J. S. Eaton, Sec. 

F. H. Turner, Manager. 

J. S. Eaton, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



sals. 



During the latter part of the year a special class in 
chemistry has been conducted, open to all students in 
the college. The interest thus far shown in these 
exercises offers encouragement for making the 
arrangement a permanent one. Several students 
have expressed the wish that a special session might 
be held for study in this subject at the college during 
the surnmer vacation. If a sufficient number are 
inclined to join such a school, a term of six or eight 
weeks will be held during the coming July and August. 
In notable instances chemistry has made up the entire 
curriculum for general disciplinary study with marked 
results. By adding these features to the chemical 
course of the regular college curriculum it is hoped to 
give a thorough preparation for activity in many profit- 
able occupations. 



The Life regrets exceedingly that it must lose the 
services of one of its most able editors, Mr. F. A. 
Merrill, who is obliged to resign on account of special 
work which he will take next year. Mr. Merrill was 



at one time Editor-in-Chief of the E. H. S. Record 
which under his able management was unusually 
successful. During his brief connection with the Life 
he has done much to promote the best interests of the 
paper and of the college and has shown himself to be 
both willing and capable in his work. He established 
a department which has proven very successful, as 
•' Through the Spectator's Glasses'' has been one of 
the most interesting and suggestive parts of the paper 
and a part having great possibilities for good. It will 
be difficult to find another who can keep this depart- 
ment up to the high standard already established. 
Mr. Merrill's sound judgment, his experience and his 
literary ability will be much missed from the Life's 
board. 



With the beginning of the term which is now 
closed, the class of- '99 instituted what is known as 
The Honor System in Examinations. This move , 
coming as it did voluntarily from the students, met 
with the most hearty approval of our Faculty. The 
idea was in the nature of an experiment here and the 
measure of its success can now be determined. 



l82 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Without exception, those professors having in charge 
the work of this term say that the standard of scholar- 
ship of the class has been raised. While the profes- 
sors can say nothing against the honesty of the stu- 
dents either in the past or the present, the students 
themselves feel that the moral sentiment of the class 
has indeed been elevated. As these are the points 
most earnestly claimed for this system, we feel 
assured that it has been successful. It has also estab- 
lished a firmer friendship and increased the confidence 
between professor and student. Having these facts in 
mind, we trust that next Fall the system will be 
adopted permanently by not only the Class of '99 but 
also by all other classes in college. With this as a 
college rule, we believe that the highest success will 
be attained not only in the individual student but also 
in our college as a whole. 



Another year has passed and left its indellible 
mark upon both student and college. The past year 
has been notable for some actions not of a laudable 
nature, and it is to be regretted that Life should be 
obliged to speak at this late day when every sur- 
rounding points more to the future than to the past. 
But the future is so built up on the present and the 
past that a word of warning should be sufficient. It 
is doubtful if the reputation of any college can with- 
stand the charge of rowdyism, much less an institution 
that is at present building up its future reputation, and 
so it behooves every lover of the college to do his very 
utmost to establish an entiente between the various 
classes and individuals that shall be lasting and final. 
There has been, among certain individuals in the col- 
lege, a spirit manifested that is not in keeping with the 
attributes of a gentleman and it is time that this des- 
picable habit of being " too fresh" is put down. Class 
feeling is allowable when it keeps within bounds, but 
the destruction or the desecration of public property is 
to be at once condemned The utter disregard of 
expressed authority is not only too common but is of 
so serious a nature as to warrant esvere punishment. 
Military drill loses the essence of its work if insubor- 
dination is present within our midst. Although many 
instances may be cited to prove that every college has 
its trials and tribulations in this line, still its prevalence 
is no excuse for its existence ; the laws that govern a 
gentleman's actions should be those that conduct a 
students life. 



SB. ■ 

-tones. 



HARRY'S INSPIRATION. 

Harry Williams sat in his room looking out of the 
window at the distant hills. A book lay in his lap 
unopened. It was the last day of recitations for the 
term, the closing term of the last year of his college 
life. He had studied hard. He felt that his educa- 
tion had amounted to something. He rather loved to 
study. Each new discovery opened up an immense 
vista, down whose interminable length his mind's eye 
loved to wander. Apparently converging, he found it 
ever widening — How fortunate an illusion! Did we 
realize at once the scope of every subject, we would 
from sheer discouragement be deterred from many a 
wise and praiseworthy endeavor. 

But Harry felt that the past was now behind him in 
thought as in reality. He must now cast his eyes 
about him for the future. It would be very wrong to 
say that he had not done so before this. Although 
two years before he had decided upon a profession, 
and had fitted himself to take this up as a life voca- 
tion, he had yet to find an opening where he might 
start. He had fitted himself for a teacher in English 
and the classics, and hoped to get a position in the 
college of his native state. A vacancy had been 
made in the corps of teachers in this very department, 
and he had written asking for the position ; but had 
received no reply up to this time. 

To-day, however, as he sat at his window, his mind 
was less taken up with these thoughts than with 
others, perhaps more congenial, and on which, of 
late, he had done a vast deal of dreaming. He had 
written to an old and very intimate friend of his boy- 
hood, asking her to attend the commencement exer- 
cises. He had received no reply yet, but there was 
time enough for that he would say to himself as he 
tried to curb his impatience. But would she come ? 
That was the question which he asked himself fifty 
times a day. He was wondering now as he gazed at 
the trailing smoke that marked the path of the express, 
if an answer to his letter was speeding on its way. 

The bell rang for recitations. He had intended 
to scan over the lesson, which he had learned the 
night before, but the time had gone quicker than he 
thought. After recitations were over, he hurried to 
the office ; for he had a premonition that a letter 



AGGIE LIFE. 



183 



awaited him there. " Pretty conduct for a senior," 
he muttered to himself, as he hurried down the street, 
" but others than myself, and older too, have acted 
worse than I have. Seniors are not the most digni- 
fied people on the globe, anyhow. No wonder people 
are puzzled to know to which end they belong." 

" A letter for you, Harry," said the jolly post-mas- 
ter, and he smiled as with a happy remembrance of 
his own, when he saw the slight flush on the young 
fellow's cheek. Harry tore open the envelope and 
read : 

"Dear Harry: — Your very kind invitation was 
received last Friday. You will excuse delay in 
answering, I know. Mother has not been v/ell, and I 
feared that I should not be able to go ; but she has 
so far recovered that I can accept your invitation and 
will come with your mother on Tuesday eve. 

Your true friend, 

WiLHELMINA NeWTON. 

"She is coming!" Harry exclaimed, "I was 
afraid she would refuse." 

" I am glad of that," said the post-master, who had 
overheard the young fellov/'s outburst of pleasure. 
Harry, who thought himself unheard, looked up and 
blushed, but he soon recovered himself, and said 
pleasantly, " Thank you, Mr. Davis." Leaving the 
store he made his way to his room. 

The next three days went by slowly enough, but 
Tuesday came at last. He walked back and forth on 
the platform fully a half hour, waiting for the tardy 
train. The big headlight at last appeared around the 
curve a quarter of a mile distant, and a minute later 
the train rolled in. Yes, there they were, — his 
mother by the window, and Wilhelmina by her side. 
Harry hurried to the steps. He helped his mother 
off and watched for her companion. The passengers 
had all left the car, but he had not seen her among 
them. How could she have passed him by. He 
turned in a half-piqued manner to inquire of his 
mother, and he saw them both laughing at his elbow. 
Greeting his mother affectionately, he turned to^Wil- 
helmina and said, as he took her extended hand. 

•' How on earth did you get by me ? I thought I 
kept pretty close watch." 

" Oh, I came down the other steps," she merrily 
replied. "You watched these so closely, I came 
down entirely unobserved on the others." 

Had she meant to avoid him ? he asked himself 



turning away for an instant. No, he would never har- 
bor such a thought. 

As he looked in her eyes again he saw a grieved 
expression as though she had read his thoughts. This 
was followed by a merry twinkle as she saw his ques- 
tioning eyes. Ah 1 how familiar were those two 
expressions. He lightly pressed her hand and 
laughed. 

" Up to your old pranks again " he said, as he led 
them to the carriage. 

The thoughts flev/ quickly in Harry's mind as they 
walked to the carriage and got in. He saw that she 
had not changed towards him, but was it only friend- 
ship ? But friendship of this kind would soon change 
to love. She was still the girl he used to know, the 
playmate of former days. He saw that in evading 
him at the train she had purposed to break down 
somewhat, any possible barriers that age and four 
years of separation might have created, and in his 
heart he thanked her for it. The grieved look had 
been as impulsive as the song of a bird. He well 
remembered how that look had melted his anger, 
when at their play he had thought she wronged him. 
No, her buoyant nature, her kind, impulsive heart had 
not changed ; but he could not say that the girl he 
once knew had not changed. Four years had made 
her a woman. In the beautiful maiden before him, 
he saw the vision of his earlier youth. 

They chatted gaily as the carriage rolled along, and 
as they passed the lighted windows of the stores, 
Harry eagerly feasted his eyes upon the face before 
him, taking keen pleasure in watching the many 
expressions that played there, at the sight of the bril- 
liant displays along the way. Arriving at their desti- 
nation, Harry left the weary travelers with the prom- 
ise to be on hand early on the morrow. 

As he made his way homeward a variety of emo- 
tions thronged his heart. There had not been time to 
find out if she cared for him. He could only hope. 
A slight embarrassment on her part he attributed to 
their long separation, for his visits at home for four 
years had been few in number. Then, too, she was a 
woman now in whom age had brought restraint. He 
could not hope to meet her on the same footing as 
when they were schoolmates. All doubts he dispelled 
before going to sleep that night and awoke in the 
morning refreshed by pleasant dreams. 



i84 



AGGIE LIFE. 



It was commencement day. The college hall was 
crowded to its utmost capacity. Every available 
standing place was occupied. Midway down the hall 
sat Harry's mother and Wilhelmina. The opening 
exercises had been gone through with ; the hall was 
hushed as the first speaker rose and went up the steps. 
Harry knew that his mother was proud and happy 
to-day ; as for Wilhelmina he could not tell. His 
piece was an original dissertation on the " Relation of 
the Crown to the Subject." He went through the 
exordium slowly and carefully, as though weighing 
every word ; as he approached the impassioned parts, 
he glanced down in a casual way where his mother 
and Wilhelmina sat. His mother's face was lighted 
up with pleasure. He glanced at her who sat by her 
side. Their eyes met, but only for an instant. Wil- 
helmina dropped hers and a soft flush mantled her 
face. Harry saw it, and it was as an electric thrill. 
From that moment he was lost in his subject. Every 
word was made to ring with all the resonance of 
which his voice was capable. He threw himself into 
his piece. They were one. When he left the plat- 
form the hall was as still as death, but only for a 
short instant. The tremendous applause that followed 
fairly shook the building. 

***** 

" Harry," said Wilhelmina as they walked home- 
ward that evening, " I am proud of you and your 
mother was so filled with pleasure and emotion she 
could hardly speak." 

Those words sounded delightful in Harry's ears. 
He was glad to have pleased his mother; he felt proud 
of his success, but he cared more at this moment for 
Wilhelmina's frank outburst than for the appl il se of 
ten thousand. The tone of her voice showed that she 
had cast reserve aside. Harry took her hand and 
pressed it and she did not resist. 

"Wilhelmina," Harry replied, "shall I tell you 
where I got my inspiration ?" 

But she did not answer. 

" Something told me, while I was speaking, that 
you cared for me ; that you loved me Willie ; that the 
love in my own heart was returned. Do you know," 
he continued, " that it was that thought that made 



me speak so well ? And that my success is due to 
you ? Need I say that if I have given you pleasure it 
is all that I desired ? Do you believe me ?" 

They had paused. Wilhelmina did not reply. Was 
she angry ? Harry asked himself, or were his for- 
mer doubts not without some foundation after all ? 
He could not believe that such was the case. At any 
rate he must tell her his heart. 

" Willie," he continued, " do you remember when 
we were playmates together, of the picnic your school 
had down in your father's lane, how a party of us boys 
and girls strolled down into the oaks together, and 
held a marriage ceremony beneath the old oaks and 
the mistletoe ? How our old chum Fred acted as 
Druid priest to perform the ceremony ? You were 
the bride that day and I the bridegroom. Do you 
remember ?" 

Wilhelmina did remember. How many times she 
had thought of it ! She believed that Harry loved 
her, and had been waiting for some avowal of his love ; 
but she hardly expected it at this time. What should 
she say? Harry saw her hesitation. Perhaps he 
was not in error after all. 

" Willie, I have loved you since that day. My feel- 
ings have not changed except to grow stronger with 
each day that passes by. Do you still love me as 
you did then ?" 

She looked up. " No," she slowly replied, " it 
would — 

" Ah," broke in Harry, " 1 see that I have been 
wrong. I was vain enough to think that you cared 
for me." 

" But you do me injustice," Wilhelmina replied, 
that old grieved look coming into her eyes, " I have 
not said that I did not. Do you think that if your 
own love has grown stronger, mine may not also ?" 

She said no more. Harry clasped her in his arms, 
and pressed a kiss on the face, upturned to meet his 
own. 

As the mariner rejoices with a good ship beneath 
him to battle with the stormy deep, so Harry was now 
ready to plunge into the sea of life, confident that with 
a good education to ride on, and with such a compan- 
ion to steer his course, the voyage of life could not 
help but be a successful one. Everett. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



185 



HOW KO-LOA MISSION WAS FOUNDED. 

Three years ago while at a fraternity banquet dur- 

ng commencement at College, the following 

personal reminiscence was given by one of its mem- 
bers, a graduate of the class of 74. 

" After leaving college in 74 " began the alumnus, 
" I became interested in missionary work and when 
the following year an offer was made me to go to 
India as a missionary, I gladly accepted. I remained 
in the vicinity of Calcutta five years, and then an 
English friend and myself began to make tours into 
the vast unknown for the purpose of establishing mis- 
sions. Thus it was in the fall of '87 we founded a 
mission nearly in the heart of Asia many hundreds of 
miles from any civilized cummunity. 

" For several reasons we found it exceedingly dif- 
ficult to deal with these Asiatic people, mainly be- 
cause of their nomadic dispositions. As you may 
remember from your grammar school geography the 
inhabitants of Central Asia live mostly in tents and 
move from place to place with their flocks. It 
was only by a coincidence that we were able to get a 
foothold at all, and it was of this coincidence I am to 
tell you. 

" It is our custom when we first enter an unknown 
but desirable country to go to the chief of the tribe 
living there and to make friendly overtures to him, 
offering such gifts as we may consider most appropri- 
ate as peace offerings. Usually in return we are 
given presents which in actual commercial value 
often far exceed any which we make ourselves. Some- 
times we will be entertained most hospitably and 
treated as little less than gods. Once I remember that 
for a kindly act in the line of surgery which I had per- 
formed upon a certain chief he brought me his daugh- 
ter as a gift, begging me to take her as my wife and 
to aid him in royal government. 

" In this particular case (the founding of our mis- 
sion in Asia) such an unfriendly disposition was shown 
towards us that our presents were returned and we 
were given plainly to understand that if v/e did not 
leave we would be killed. We did not heed the threat, 
but made the natives understand by our every act 
that we had come to stay. The chief did not know 
what to do, for, by the unwritten laws of most every 
barbarous tribe to kill a guest is to be haunted by 
his evil spirit forever. We knew this and were rely- 



ing upon it for our safety. 

" One night about three weeks after our arrival we 
were awaked by the most unearthly shrieking and 
yelling I have ever heart. We started up immediate- 
ly but before we could grasp our rifles our tent was 
knocked down upon us and we were as completely in 
a trap as one can imagine. It seemed hours before 
we could collect our senses enough to make an effort 
to get out. Neither could hear what the other said. 
Everything was as if the very fiends of the infernal 
regions had been let loose. To make matters worse 
we were being trampled upon, by a whole army it 
seemed, as if we were dust. 

" At last, however, both of us managed to crawl 
out. It was just beginning to grow light, and we 
could only discern vaguely forms running wildly all 
about us. We were dumb-founded at such proceed- 
ings as we could see nothing to cause such commo- 
tion. But we were not left in doubt for a shower of 
arrows and spears gave us startling evidence that we 
had been surprised by a hostile tribe during the night, 
and that unless something could be done we would 
surely be made prisoners. In a second we realized the 
danger of our position. Suddenly the happy thought 
came to me that if we could now render some assist- 
tance to the chief and his people, our success as 
missionaries would be secure. I thereupon grasped 
my companion by the arm and yelled to him, ' Come 
I Fred, here's our chance. We'll fight for them. 
1 We've got to do something.' 

" He saw my idea in a minute and with his charac- 

' teristic quickness he caught up a large club and 

' began to yell and swing it about his head. We both 

I started in the direction of the chief's tent where some 

1 cool headed warrior was frantically beating the war 

' drum. V/hen we had gone about a hundred yards we 

I came upon a group of frightened braves who were 

gathering in a body to do what they could to save 

their homes. In their midst, the only one who 

apparently knew what he was doing, was the brother 

■ of the chief for as I learned afterwards he was the 

i only one of the chief's household who had escaped 

from the ememy. 

" Our unexpected appearence was just what was 

needed to give courage to the half hearted band and give 

them an immediate something to think of. We had 

' always been looked upon as beings with some unseen 



1 86 



AGGIE LIFE. 



powers, and now that they saw us running towards 
them making unmistakable signs that we had come to 
help them in battle, their superstitious minds grasped 
the idea that the ruling spirit had sent us to free them 
from their enemies. 

" I need not delay longer with the story for you all 
can guess the result. We led the assault at first but 
as the enthusiasm of battle spread and the desire of 
revenge ruled their actions we found ourselves in a 
mob of howling warriors all intent upon showing brav- 
ery. Still there was some-reorder for at a signal a 
band slid noislessly into the woods on each side and 
were lost to sight. Five minutes later v/e heard them 
far ahead shouting as they encircled the enemy. 
Then commenced one of the fiercest hand to hand 
battles that I have seen or expect to see. I never 
saw such animal-like fighting by any people before. 
Blood and death seemed to be the only thing that 
would quench their thirst for revenge. 

" Within an hour from the time of our rude awak- 
ing all was quiet again except for an occasional groan 
or a fiendish laugh, 

" That afternoon towards evening an escort of the 
chief's best people came to take us in honor to his 
tent. We went and were received with royal hospital- 
ity and were made many presents which we have to 
this day. Everything we asked was granted us and 
from that day Ko-loa Mission in Asia has been our 
pride. " 



THE TREASURE OF LISLE. 

It was sometime during the fall of 17 — that I 
journeyed on foot from Harbridge to Lisle, I remem- 
ber that I was scarcely eighteen years old then and 
the leaves on the wayside trees had already become 
tinged with red. The exact date of my journey has 
passed from my memory, as I am growing somewhat 
old and the uncertainties of my numerous wanderings 
have become as shadowy images in the fog that envel- 
opes my younger years. 

I was a good deal of a gypsy in those days, roaming 
wherever my fancy led me and no place could claim 
me for any longer than a short week at any one time. 
I had early been apprenticed by my father, an Irras- 
clble man, to my brother who carried on a business in 
leather. The life I led in my brother's establishment 
was far from my taste and I fear that I did not avoid 



giving the poor fellow every opportunity he could wish 
for correcting me. Nor were his corrections merely 
those of voice and example. More often they took 
the form of corporal punishment of so severe a nature 
that I was fain to crawl away and lament my misfor- 
tunes. My brother's business afforded excellent 
instruments for this torture, and he was not loathe to 
avail himself of his stock in trade when the question 
arose between us. 

Many a night have 1 laid awake and counted the 
stars, too sore and weary to sleep on my narrow bed, 
but the next day would often witness a repetition of my 
offense and, most likely, a renewal of the strap. 
Twice 1 had run away, disgusted with the treatment 
that I received, only to be brought back by my irate 
father for another and more severe punishment. 

I stood this life for two years when I effected my 
escape, and the tanning shop knew me no more. I 
crossed the heath during the dusk so that my escape 
would be the more secure, and the dawning day found 
me many miles from my brother. 

As I roamed through the strange country lands, with 
their isolated farms and rolling hillsides, I felt a cer- 
tain freedom that I have never experienced since and 
that sent the blood tingling through my veins. I felt 
my own master and I revelled in the delightful free- 
dom until my stomach demanded food. Then, and 
not until then, did I realize that life is not all beer and 
skittles, and that now I had only my own exertions to 
sustain me. I had rid myself of a disagreeable situa- 
tion only to be confronted with a new and stranger 
one ; one in which I had had no experience and which 
proved to occupy my whole attention for the next few 
years. 

1 can hardly remember the details of those years of 
incessant toil and wanderings when I literally lived 
from hand to mouth. The events of those years seem 
mingled in a confused heterogeneous mass ; how I 
wandered from town to town, subsisting upon the 
profits of my trade, how I often escaped grave dangers 
is beyond my power to recall at this late day. That I 
must have subsisted in a manner is beyond dispute, for 
it was, as I have said, sometime in the fall of 17 — 
that I walked from Harbridge to Lisle. 

The road was dusty and narrow, fringed with hedges 
of wild growth wherein I could often see the nest of 
some ground bird. It was the better part of six miles 



AGGIE LIFE, 



187 



to Lisle and I had planned to reach the town at dusk, 
but sonie slight event on the road had attracted my 
attention and it was well along into the evening before 
the lights of the town peeped up out of the valley. 

The previous days had been fortunate ones for me 
and my wallet was better filled than usual, so I had 
determined to put up at the only tavern the place 
afforded. This house was a low, one and a half story 
affair that I had seen once or twice before, and v/as 
called the Ram's Head Inn, owing to a ram's skull 
having been unearthed when the foundations were laid. 

As I came in plain sight of the village a black crow 
flew up from the bushes by my side, encircled my 
head twice, and then disappeared above some tall 
trees that cut the sky at my other side. This was the 
sign of some unfortunate adventure, and I trembled in 
my shoes as I entered the narrow street. 

My first thought was to reach the inn and satisfy 
my hunger which had now become intolerable, and 
then seek out such company as the place might afford 
and forget the unlucky omen that now preyed upon 
my mind. It was with this thought in mind that I 
rapped upon the massive doors. 

Although the house was brilliantly lighted no sound 
came from within and, after repeated rappings, I was 
about to leave in disgust when the door was slightly 
opened and I beheld a woman's face, white and pale 
with fright. 

This was hardly what I expected in this part of the 
country and I was not prepared for the astonishing 
question that was directly put to me. Without 
opening the door beyond, perhaps, a hand's breadth, 
the woman, for so I judged her, whispered in a hoarse 
voice : 

" He's not here, I say. He's gone over the hills. 
Why don't you go off for good ? " 

I little knew what this meant nor was I inclined to 
stand outside and argue the point. At that time in 
my life I was fairly well developed and much stronger 
than the usual run of boys about my age, so I simply 
thrust my foot between the open door and its casing 
and then the woman was unable to shut me out. 
Having now settled the question as to whether I was 
to be shut out in the night air or admitted, I regained 
my composure and spoke to the woman as calmly as 
I could : 

"Madam," I said, and I remember that my voice 



sounded louder than was its custom, " who ' he ' is I 
don't know, neither do I care. If he went over the 
hills, so much the better, and his society will not be 
thrust upon me. I suppose that he has a perfect right 
to go over the hills or down to the sea, if he so desires, 
and far be it from me to hinder him. But I fancy, 
my good woman, that I have the choice of entering 
your hospitable abode. You keep an inn, I believe ? 
Ah, I felt sure that you did. Will you kindly admit 
me ? I fancy the choice is mine you know." 

I said this last in my most seductive tones and was 
surprised to find that the door yielded to the gentle 
pressure of my foot and swung open. No sooner had 
I stepped inside, than the door was hastily closed and 
bolted. The quickness of the movement astonished 
me and I turned to look at the person who had accom- 
plished it so rapidly, when to my astonishment I found 
that what I had taken for a woman was a young and 
beautiful girl of about my own age. Fear had so 
stamped itself upon her face that it is no wonder that 
I had mistaken her years. 

She turned toward me, scanned me closely and 
then seemed satisfied. She said : 

" Thank God, it's only you." 

" Yes, my dear young lady," I replied as soon as 
my astonishment had somewhat subsided. " It is only 
I. Were you expecting some one else ? " 

" Yes, yes. They are all over the country to-night. 
But I see you are not one of them." 

" I am not, I can assure you. I am alone, and 
have been alone the whole day. But who are they ? 
You speak of more than one." 

" Yes," she said, and I saw that she was breathing 
easier. " The Press Gang is about the country." 

That was all she said, and yet I quickly compre- 
hended her white face and horror-stricken counte- 
nance. I turned and examined the bolts upon the 
door ; they were securely in place. I tried the door 
itself, but it was as firm as the wall that surrounded 
us. She gave me a look of gratitude as I passed into 
an inner room and swiftly followed me. 

The lights were burning brightly in the large tap 
room as indeed they were in all the other rooms. I 
noted this as I had approached the inn and had mar- 
velled that so much light should be about when no 
human being was visible. When we both had fairly 
entered the room, I laid my pack down for the first 



1 88 



AGGiE JLIl^'l:.. 



time, and, turning to my companion, said : — 

" Why have you kept the lights burning? " 

With some hesitation the young girl replied, " I was 
very much afraid, sir ; I feared that they would come 
back and I did not wish them to think that I was 
alone." 

'' But if you fear the Press Gang, do you not realize 
that a light would attract them ? Where there is 
light there must be men, and men are what they are 
after." 

" I never thought of that," she whimpered. 

•' Is any one about the house ? " I asked. 

" None but ourselves, sir," she replied. 

After this little was said, I blew out all but one 
candle, and did the same in the room adjoining the 
one into which we first went. After I had finished my 
task I asked my hostess to get me what she could for 
food and drink, and begged her to hurry as I had not 
taken a mouthful since early morning. 

While she hastened to perform my bidding, I sat 
before the slow dying fire and warmed my cold legs. 
The morning's walk had been wet and the cool even- 
ing had but brought on my old trouble so that I was 
glad to be beside a warm hearth. The events of the 
day had been so commonplace that it seemed almost 
incredible that I should be so near this dreaded gang 
without in any wise being cognizant of it. I had often 
heard of the terrible depredations made upon our sea- 
port towns and the horrible sufferings left in the wake 
of this pest, but never had I encountered the Press 
Gang in all my wanderings, and I was sincerely thank- 
ful that I had escaped it. 

Now that I was housed up in the neighborhood of 
\vhat might prove to be a profitable field for these 
marauders, the gravity of the situation impressed itself 
upon me and I verily believe I quaked with fear. I 
was especially fond of a nomadic life with its many 
uncertainties, but I had no mind to carry my peregrin- 
ations over the sea to some country whose people I 
knew not and whose climate might be bad for my 
health. Besides, I was always deathly sick at sea and 
I had come to look upon a fighting ship as a veritable 
hell upon earth, so it was with no especially pleasant 
countenance that I welcomed the return of my 
companion. 

Without a word of grateful thanks I set about my 



meal, and it was not until I was well finished that I 
deigned to speak to the girl who stood waiting before 
me. As I finally looked at her, I could not help 
marking her peculiar beauty, and wondering how I had 
been so very blind as not to notice it before. She 
was older than I, by perhaps a year or two, but she 
had a youthful face behind the careworn look and I 
saw that she had come to regard me favorably. Nor 
was I an object to be set aside by a mere look of 
approval. At that time I was fairly tall, well knit and 
of powerful build ; I was an adept at wrestling and my 
erratic life had taught me many a hard lesson never 
to be forgot. I prided myself on my cleanliness and 
the fit of my jerkin, so I fancied then that I cut a fair 
figure before the lady. 

" Well, my dear," I answered, unconsciously taking 
the words and intonations of a worldly fellow. " I 
have finished well, thanks to you. Now tell me about 
this gang. When were they here and what did they 
do?" 

" They had been gone scarcely an hour before you 
came. They were here in the village the greater part 
of the afternoon, and I fear much that they will return 
again. Their luck was not great, for, with the excep- 
tion of my father and brothers, they got only two 
more." 

Then I realized the fright that the poor girl must 
have had and I pitied her. Perhaps the following had 
better be left unsaid, at least as to details. Suffice it 
that after many assurances of my faithful aid and 
some small endearments upon my part she told me all 
that had happened during the afternoon. 

It seems that about midday she had gone over the 
hill on an errand and had returned in time to see a 
great number of men fighting before the tavern. 
Fearing that harm had come to her father, she hur- 
ried forward and had been enabled to reach the road 
in time to see her relatives dragged off toward the 
coast. Fearful of new dangers she hid among the 
bushes until night had covered the hamlet and then 
she had crept to her home and locked herself in. 

When I knocked, she had expected to find that the 
gang had returned, but she soon learned that I was 
alone and might prove an ally for her. Her natural 
timidity would not permit her to remain in the house 
without light and so, with a woman's natural inaptitude, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



189 



she had brilHantly illumined every room. 

I was fearful lest the multitude of lights would again 
attract the men and I warned her that it would be 
better if we put out the few remaining, but this she 
would not sanction and I was rather glad of it as It 
gave me an opportunity to feast my eyes upon her 
exquisite beauty. This fascinated me and I resolved 
that if it lay within my power I would die sooner than 
see this maiden ravished by the hungry horde of man- 
hunters that were then infesting the coast. 

About midnight, as near as I can judge the time, 
we were both startled by hearing the sound of many 
footsteps about the house. We had been sitting in 
the tap room as quietly as possible and neither of us 
had spoken a word for some time so I judged that it 
must have been our lights that attracted some 
attention. 

" Hush ! " she said in a low whisper, '• Don't move, 
for they have come back." 

It was needless for her to warn me ; I was as quiet 
as it was possible for man to be. Only my heart beat 
fast, and that seemed to me to make a noise like an 
anvil. We waited breathlessly while some one tried 
the door and windows. I was thankful that I had 
inspected all our vulnerable points and it proved that 
my inspection had been thorough, for after sometime 
the effort to enter was abandoned and a crowd gath- 
ered about the door, talking together in low whispers. 
I could hear the busy hum of their voices and that 
was all ; I could distinguish no words. 

Suddenly all talking ceased and we had come to 
the conclusion that the attack had been abandoned 
when we were both startled by the noise made by 
some one jumping onto the floor of the room above 
our heads ; this noise was followed by a like until I 
counted that six men must be in the upper room. I 
turned to my companion and was about to speak when 
she put her fingers to my lips and whispered carefully 
in my ear : 

" Stay right where you are ; don't move. I will 
return directly." 

With these few words, she glided noiselessly away 
from me toward the door that I felt intuitively must 
lead to the room up stairs, with a deft turn of her 
hand she locked it, but not without some noise At 
the sound of the turning key there came a cry of joy 
from those above and I knew that they were coming. 



How long that door would withstand their charge I 
knew not, and I was about to rise when I saw my 
companion open a cupboard beside the mantle shelf, 
thrust in her arm and as quickly withdraw it, holding 
in her hand a leaden casket. This she placed in my 
hands, with the exclamation : 

"It is the treasure of Lisle. Guard it well until you 
are far from here. Follow me quickly." 

I was only too glad to get out of that room, for I 
could easily see that the thin deal door could no 
longer withstand the pressure that was being given it, 
and, indeed, as soon as we had passed into the hall, 
the thin panels cracked and the door gave way. 

The next few moments were lived so rapidly that I 
hardly know exactly what happened. I remember 
seeing a trap-door lifted up, and of being thrust rapidly 
down a very steep flight of stone steps. The next 
instant I heard the trap snap to and then I thought I 
heard my companion fall on it as if she had fainted. 
I called and knocked in vain but I got no answer, and 
as footsteps were rapidly approaching over my head, I 
concluded that I would pursue my course alone. 

The passage way was dark and slimy, and from the 
dampness everywhere present I concluded that I must 
be underground. The only way that I could proceed 
was to grope before me with outstretched hand, and 
so, with the casket tightly clasped under one arm, I 
stumbled along, scaring huge rats away in my head- 
long flight. 

The length of that passage I have never been able 
to compute ; it must have taken me over two hours to 
traverse it. The way was difficult and the travelling 
very slow. It seemed an interminable route and I 
had to rest every little while. The coffer under my 
arm increased in weight and I became weary with 
carrying it, and then my natural curiosity was aroused 
and I wanted to know its contents. It was with min- 
gled feelings of hope and discontent that I painfully 
toiled on, cursing my luck and yet grateful for the fact 
that I had escaped the clutches of the demons of the sea. 

A sudden turn in the roadway gave me new hope, 
and it was with a cry of joy that I found my journey 
was almost ended. I had seen the heavens and there 
before my eyes sparkled the stars of night. My bur- 
den seemed to grow lighter as my hopes increased 
and the rest of the journey I accomplished with little 
difficulty. 



igo 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The passageway led out upon the wide moors, and 
as soon as I was free from it I breathed a sigh of 
rehef and sank exhausted amid the coarse grass. 
When I awoke the sun was high in the heavens and 
the heat of its rays beat pleasantly upon my body. 
For some moments I lay perfectly still, content to let 
my body rest after its terrible work. My mind, too, 
needed quiet, and it was sometime before the events 
of the past night came back to me more clearly. 
When I fully realized what I had been through and 
where I was, I turned to where the casket lay. It was 
a cry of pain I gave when I saw it. There it lay, its 
cover broken open and the treasure of Lisle was gone. 

Fred A. Merrill. 



HROUGH THE SPECTATOR'S GIUSSES. 



There are few institutions that excel in their depart- 
ment of English and of these few perhaps Harvard 
University is the most prominent. To be able to 
attend a course of lectures delivered by Prof. Charles 
Eliot Norton is of itself a liberal education. In this 
respect, Yale University has proven to be rather weak. 
The strong attack upon its English department recent- 
ly made by General Chamberlain, has undoubedtly 
opened the eyes of both faculty and alumni to this 
deplorable condition and steps will soon be taken 
to remedy the glaring defect. 

The study of clear and concise English is of so 
manifest an importance that it seems strange that its 
continuance should not be held to the strictest lines 
of accuracy. Its desuetude is deplorable, but its 
abuse is a crime. 

In a university with the standing of Yale, a lack of 
ability to write good English is a blemish upon the 
fair blue of her flag. That this will no longer exist, 
is to by sincerely hoped. The sons of old Eli are too 
numerous and too proud of their prowess in other 
fields to allow this stagnation to continue. 

The same might be said of many other although 
smaller colleges. There is no language more import- 
ant to the American than is the English. It is the 
language of business the world over, just as French is 
the language of society and Italian that of love. 
There are no sweeter love songs than those of Italy ; 
there are no keener "bon-mots" than those of France 
and there are no sturdier tones than those of good 



old English. We may not have the delicate shades 
of meaning of the one, or the sonorous chimes of the 
other, but we do have force, energy and compactnsss 
in this English language we speak. 

There is no excuse for a college man to use bad 
expressions, ungrammatical and inharmonious. And 
yet, how often do we hear sentences in daily use 
that offend the sense of harmony ? How often are 
we made painfully aware of a genuine lack of techni- 
cal knowledge of the grammar of our native tongue ? 

There is no profession, be it that of the Agricul- 
turist or that of the Cloth, that does not need, and 
need often, the use of good sound English. In every 
science, in every art there are ideas to express, and 
it is absolutely necessary that those ideas should be 
expressed clearly and forcibly. 

One of the chief charms that went to make up 
Prof. Tyndall was his extreme facility with the pen. 
Hardly any writer has ever brought science to the 
layman with a more lucid argument or more fetching 
description than this dead Englishman. He was the 
middleman between the student and the master : his 
pen opened up to the youthful reader a new field, the 
wonderful kaleidoscope of Nature. 

What Tyndall did for the natural sciences, Proctor 
did for Astronomy, White for the customs and habits 
of the English, Hume for History and Burroughs for 
the lover of Nature. Each was a master of English 
and each has brought that science or art, which he 
loved so well, within the intellectual range of any 
reader. 

It is not possible for us all to be the equal of 
Charles Lamb. We may not be able to discourse 
learnedly and completely upon "Roast Pig," nor may 
we ever have a "Bridget Elia" to write about, but we 
should be able to appreciate and understand the 
classics of our language without an amount of mid- 
night study that is very distressing to our eyes. 

The value of a thorough knowledge of English lies 
not alone in the fact that thereby one becomes con- 
versant with the gems of ages, but it has a wider 
application, a more extended range. The study of 
this language broadens a man's whole life ; increases 
his interest in those motives that have swayed nations 
and makes him a capable judge of all that is beautiful 
and true. 

There is so much of misery in this world, so much 



AGGIE LIFE. 



191 



of sensationalism, that it becomes a relief to once 
again journey with Roderick Random, to listen to the 
dissertations of Sir. Roger de Coverly or to live the 
fanciful schemes of Don Quixote and his faithful 
henchman. 

Among the books of the day, one finds so much 
that is strained, incongruous and affected that the 
writer of pure, untainted English is an anomaly. Per- 
haps such an one was Louis Stevenson. No sweeter 
songster ever lived, than this bard from tropical 
Samoa. And what made this man great ? 

It was his nobility of character, his sweet disposi- 
tion, his abiding faith, his love of children and his broad 
humanity. These, each and all, reflected themselves 
in his books, and whether we take up the "Child's 
Garden of Verse " or " Katrina, " we will always lay 
the book aside and say, with a sigh of relief, that 
here is a man who could see the good and the bright 
in life, not the abnormal and the dismal : here is a 
man whose broad humanity embraced all sorts and 
conditions of men, and whose name shall endure so 
long as the beautiful English that he wrote- shall 
exist. 

The Spectator. 



Aggie, 3 ; Trinity, 0. 

Our team defeated Trinity on the grounds of the 
Hartford Atlantic league team, Saturday, May 28, by 
the score of 3 to 0. 

It was a pitcher's battle throughout and Eaton had 
the best of it. Bunn relieved Graves of Trinity in 
the sixth and pitched good ball. The game was very 
interesting. Several times Trinity had men on -sec- 
ond and third but failed to make the necessary hits. 

In the fifth with none out and men on second and 
third Eaton struck out the next three men. It may be 
said that Eaton pitched his best game thus far this 
season. 

In the seventh with two out Glazebrook succeeded 
in making a hit over second and Bunn reached his 
base on a wild throw by Ahearn and Bellamy came 
to the plate with a determined look on his face. The 
first ball he let go by but the next ball he met and 
cracked it out between left and centre, but luckily 
Graves had his eye on it and caught the ball on the 



dead run. It was a phenomenal catch and saved two 
runs. The fielding of Graves was of high order. He 
accepted seven chances without an error. 

Our team played exceptionally well, only one error 
being made and that was excusable. 

In the sixth Bunn gave Ahearn a base. He stole 
second and reached third on a fumble by McNeil of 
Hooker's grounder. Both men scored on Eaton's hit 
over second. 

Again in the eighth Ahearn reached his base on a 
low throw by Fiske. He stole a base and reached 
home on Crowell's sacrifice. This ended the scoring 
and the game was won 3 to by our team. The 
score is as follows : 

Aggie. 



Warden, 3b. 










1 








Hooker, m. 




1 


1 


1 








Ahearn, s.s. 




2 





1 


1 


1 


Crowel!, c. 







1 


1 1 








Barry, lb. 










4 








Eaton, p. 







1 


2 


I 





Graves, l.f. 










7 








Halligan, 2b. 







1 











Paul, r.f. 



















Total, 


Trinity 


3 


3 


27 


2 


1 






R. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Fiske. 3b. 







1 


1 


2 





Graves, p., s.s. 













2 





Glazebrook, c. 







2 


9 


1 


1 


Bunn, s s. p. 










1 


1 





Bellamy, lb. 










8 





1 


Watman. m. 







1 


1 





I 


McNeil, 2b. 







1 


3 


5 


4 


Cooke, r.f. 










1 








Brown, l.f. 










3 









Total, 5 27 11 7 

Innings, 123456789 

Agfgie, 2 1 0—3 

Times at bat— Aggies 37, Trinity 34. Two-base hit— Glazebrook. 

Struck out — by Graves 3. by Bunn 4, by Eaton 9. First base on balls— off 
Graves 1 , off Bunn 1 . Hit by pitched ball — by Bunn 1 . Umpire — Vickery. 

Time of game — Ih. 45m. Attendance— 500. 

Aggie, 8 ; Williston, 6. 

Our team visited Easthampton Saturday, June 4, 
and defeated Williston by the above score. The 
score would have been smaller had not our team got 
rattled in the fourth inning. 

The features of the game were Eaton's pitching 
and his catch of a foul fly and Casey's batting. 
Aggie ran bases in fine style and hit the ball when 
hits meant runs. 

The score is as follows : 



Aggie. 



Eaton, p. 
Hooker, m. 
Ahearn. s.s. 
Hinds, l.f. 
Crowell, c. 
Warden, s.s. 
Barry, lb 
Halligan, 2b. 
Graves, r.f. 

Total, 



1 





2 


3 





2 


1 











1 
1 

1 


2 

1 
1 


3 

1 
6 


1 



1 










3 


2 





1 


1 





9 





2 




1 


1 

1 


3 
1 


4 




1 



27 



ig2 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Roberts, 3b, 
Wescott, 2b. 
Hull, l.f. 
Maddox, lb. 
Goodrich, m. 
Casey, s.s. 
Keedy, r.f. 
Ely. p. 
Pond, c. 

Total, 
Innings, 
Aggie, 
WilMston, 



ILLISTON. 


















R. 
1 
1 




B. 

2 





P.O. 



1 




A. 


3 




E. 
1 
1 







1 






















2 




10 









2 












1 












2 
1 
1 




2 

1 
1 




3 

1 





4 

3 





1 













8 









1 


6 




9 




24 




10 




6 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 




3 


I 








1 


3 





X- 


-8 








1 


5 











0- 


-6 



Two-base hits — Warden, Casey, Ahearn, Halllgan. Three-base hit— Casey. 
Struck out — by Eaton 6. bv Ely 6. First base on balls— off Eaton 1. Hit 
by pitched ball — by Eaton 1, by Ely 1. Time — 2h. Umpires — Clark and 
Hockenheimer. 

Collect l^otfs. 



— Commencement ! 

— Remember the '' Kommers" to-night ! 

— Gamwell '01 has returned to his home in Pitts- 
field, Mass. 

— Paul '01 has left college, and has enlisted and 
gone to the front. 

— Lieut. Wright has recently become the happy 
father of a son. 

— Deputy Stimpson of the State Grange recently 
visited the College. 

— The base-ball team was recently photographed 
by Lovell of Amherst. 

— Alex. Montgomery Jr. spent last week at his 
home in Natick, Mass. 

— H. W. Dana '99 will be employed by the King, 
Richardson Co. this summer. 

— Rev. George H. Clark of Maiden, addressed the 
Y. M. C. A. Sunday evening. 

— Prof. Cooley has been elected chairman of the 
Union Lecture Course Committee. 

— F. H. Turner '99 and Rice '01 recently attended 
the banquet of the C. S. C. at Storrs. 

— The commencement exercises of Boston Univer- 
sity were held during the first week of June. 

— Brown, formerly of the Sophomore class has 
been promoted to the rank of sergeant. 

— Dr. G. E. Stone of the botanical department 
delivered an address at Marsfield last Saturday. 

— The Rev. Mr. Chaffee, pastor of the Methodist 
church, addressed the Y, M. C. A. last Sunday after- 
noon. 



— Rev. J. H. Crocker of Troy, N. Y. , preached the 
baccalaureate sermon, in the college chapel last 
Sunday. 

— Dr. William P. Brooks and wife are now mem- 
bers of the Amherst Grange, having joined at the last 
meeting. 

— Prof. Mills and Dr. Brooks recently attended the 
commencement of the deaf and dumb institute, at 
Northampton. 

— Hooker, Hinds and Walker of the class of '99 
will continue their studies at the Insectary during the 
summer vacation. 

— Pres. Goodell and Prof. Charles Wellington 
recently attended the commencement exercises of 
Boston University. 

— Halligan '00 was injured in the head during the 
game with Trinity Memorial Day, but was able to be 
about in a few days. 

— The College Shakespearean Club held an infor- 
mal reception in their club rooms on Monday after- 
noon, from 4-30 to 5-30. 

— A group of evergreen trees has been planted 
about the new stone bridge, which adds much to the 
attractiveness of the spot. 

— Prof. Maynard is to be congratulated upon the 
birth of a son, who we hope will prove as loyal a son 
of '' Aggie " as is his father. 

— Last week was allowed the Seniors for a short 
vacation before commencement. Many of the class 
spent the week at their homes. 

— At a recent meeting of the base-ball players, W. 
R. Crowell '00 was elected captain of the next year's 
nine and F. H. Turner '99 manager. 

— President Goodell has been appointed as one of 
tha judges of the Hyde prize speaking, held at Am-- 
herst College during commiencement week. 

— D. A. Beaman '99 will canvass this summer for 
a New York firm. He will sell stereoscopic views, the 
fine quality of which should insure his success. 

• — As part of the course in Horticulture for this 
term, the junior class recently made a short trip about 
town, in charge of Prof. Maynard. They visited all 
the principal estates in town and observed the many 
different methods of ornamental gardening. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



193 



— The Cycle, the D. G. K. annual, has recently 
been issued. The publication this year shows hard 
work, and is up to the standard of former years. 

■ — Prof. S. T. Maynard recently attended the meet- 
ing of the " Fruit-growers' Association " of Massachu- 
setts held at Worcester. Prof. Maynard is the secre- 
tary of the association. 

— We are glad to see the little " difficulty" of the 
Freshman class satisfactorily settled. The class has 
shown the right spirit in the matter and we sincerely 
hope that there will be no more such misunderstand- 
ings. 

— The drawings for rooms, to be occupied next 
year, were held last week. The upper class-men as 
usual had the preference, wnile the new men will have 
opportunity to obtain rooms at the time when the 
entrance examinations are held. 

— A " Kommers " for alumni, faculty and under- 
graduates will be held in the Drill Hall immediately 
after the President's reception to-night. Everyone 
should make it a point to attend and all may be sure 
that a royal good time awaits them. 

— Owing to the absence of Lieut. Wright and the 
loss of our military equipment, no military exercises 
will be held this week. In place of the drill however, 
patriotic addresses will be in order, after which will 
come the presentation of military diplomas. 

— The course in Entomology as presented to the 
Junior class this term, has been one of great value. 
Each student was required to obtain a collection of 
insects, which together with the lectures, made the 
work of a most useful and practical kind. 

— The honor system as adopted by the Junior class 
has had a thorough trial during the last term. The 
results obtained from the honor system have been 
most satisfactory in every way. We believe that a 
higher stand has been taken by the class and that 
more conscientious work has been accomplished than 
ever before. The relations between the professor and 
student have been entirely different than before and 
the class has upheld the trust which the professors 
have given them. It is very much desired that other 
classes should adopt this system, which once given a 
fair trial will prove a great benefit to the class and 
to the college. 



— While the committees upon Military, Agriculture 
and Education were inspecting the College a short 
time ago, President Goodell seized the opportunity to 
impress upon them the urgent necessity for the imme- 
diate passage of a bill then lying upon the table in the 
House, providing for an appropriation of $28,000 for 
the erection of a suitable building for the work of the 
Veterinary department, chemical equipment, and a 
dairy plant. After the return of these committees, 
the bill was taken from the table and passed in both 
houses with very little opposition. 

—The class of '99 has been requested to hand in 
the electives which the different members desire to 
take next year. The selection of these electives should 
be made only after the m.ost careful consideration. A 
committee composed of Prof. Ostrander, Prof. Mills 
and Dr. Wellington has been formed by the faculty, 
for the purpose of considering electives and different 
courses of study. Any students who are in doubt as 
to the subjects to be taken during their Senior year 
would receive many helpful suggestions from this 
committee. The electives must be handed in before 
the close of commencement week in order to facili- 
tate the forming of next term's schedule. 

— On the first day of the month the Freshmen and 
Sophomores again met on the fields of battle to once 
more contest for supremacy. More or less interest is 
always manifested in these class contests, and, as 
usual, a goodly number of fellows made their appear- 
ance to watch the progress of the game. The two 
teams took the field with 1901 at the bat. From the 
beginning of the game the Freshmen kept the lead in 
the score, and easily outplayed the Sophs.' in field 
work. At every good play the loyal men, who occu- 
pied the seats near by, gave their men the yell, the 
air ringing alternately with Hullabaloo and Hyp Zoo, 
Rah Zoo. The Juniors rallied to the support of the 
Freshmen, while now and then the old warriors on the 
left came out with a feeble cry to encourage their dis- 
heartened disciples. Columbia's robes, floating here 
and there among the crowd, contributed greatly to the 
spirit of the hour. Everything went smoothly till the 
the last inning, when 1900, who were at the bat, 
played a trick to score a run, but it didn't succeed. 
After considerable wrangling the cool-headed umpire 
declared the game called with the score ten to three 
in favor of 1901. 



194 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— No little attention is being turned toward the 
Drawing department in charge of Mr. W. H. Arm- 
strong of the class of '99, and the progress made in 
this department since he has been in charge is very 
marked. It is hardly necessary to give here details 
of the work accomplished this year. The exhibition 
made of the work in this department has called forth 
very favorable criticism, and much surprise is mani- 
fested by visitors at the quality of the work done by 
students who had absolutely no previous training in 
this line. In 1896, upon the resignation of the mili- 
tary officer who had this department in charge, Mr. Arm- 
strong was appointed to take charge of the work. A 
new drawing room was provided and with an addi- 
tional equipment, a decided advance was made in the 
work. Since then the drawing room has been excel- 
lently equipped with a fine collection of plaster repro- 
ductions of Roman and Italian sculptures. A new 
course was planned and carried out. the work for the 
year in free hand drawing being as follows : Free- 
hand — Ornaments of curved and straight lines ; Per- 
spective — Lectures, Elementary design. Lettering and 
historical ornament ; Charcoal — Study of light and 
shade ; Pencil — Sketching and shading ; Anatomical 
drawing — Plant and animal structure ; Pen sketching 
for mercantile designing ; introductory lessons in arch- 
itectural drawing leading to the structure of rural 
buildings. Some excellent work has been accom- 
plished, and it is gratifying to learn that men without 
previous training have attained the highest honors. 
In addition to the first prize offered by the instructor 
this year, a second prize has been given for excel- 
lence of worK and progress made. The prizes were 
awarded as follows : First prize, Dickran Bedros 
Tashjian, Kharpoot, Turkey; second prize, James 
Buell Henry, Scitio, Conn. 

— On " Freshman Night," June 17, the Freshman 
class held its first annual class banquet, at Cooley's 
Hotel, Springfield. At a little after 10 o'clock the 
class of 1901 sat down to a sumptuous repast. The 
souvenir menus provided for each guest were both 
handsome and unique. After the Freshman had sat- 
isfied themselves as to the superior quality of the 
dishes before them, the toastmaster, C. E. Gordon of 
Clinton, spoke on the honor the Freshmen had con- 
ferred on the College by holding their Banquet on the 
anniversary of the battle of Bunker Hill. The toasts 



were as follows : " M. A. C." A. C. Wilson of Boston ; 
" An Unexpected Pleasure," J. C. Barry of Amherst ; 
" '99 andl900," H. J. Moulton of Milford ; " A Bucolic 
Lecture," F. E. Hemenway of Barre ; " 1901," C. 
L. Rice of Pittsburg; -'The First Milestone," G. R. 
Bridgeforth of Westmoreland, Ala.; " The Faculty," 
E. S. Gamwell of Pittsfield ; " Our Ghostly Visitor,' ' 
A. R. Dorman of Springfield ; " Stump Speech," P. 
C. Brooks of Brockton. Mr. Wilson reviewed the past 
of the M. A. C. and raised great hopes for its future. 
As Mr. Barry was not able to be present J. H. Todd 
of Rowley took his place and told some very amusing 
sketches of Irish life in the city. Mr. Moulton spoke 
of the relations between the classes of '99 and '00. 
A Bucolic Lecture by Mr. Hemenway brought out 
new light on the noble art of agriculture, Mr. Rice 
reviewed the class history for the year, in a very inter- 
esting manner. Mr. Bridgeforth delivered an address 
on the milestones, marking each year's progress in 
college. The banquets of the past, from, the begin- 
ning of man were spoken on by Mr. Dorman. The 
card of rules placed in every room of the hotel was 
read in an original and attractive manner by Mr. 
Brooks. After singing a number of college songs the 
banquet broke up. The committee on arrangements 
was Messrs. Rice, Brooks and Barry. Much regret 
was expressed that Mr. Gamwell's illness prevented 
him from being present. The class was on hand next 
morning to give a good send off to Paul, a 1901 man, 
who has recently enlisted, and who passed through 
Springfield on his way to join his regiment in the 
South. 



\umnin 



AGGIE MEN IN THE ARMY AND NAVY. 

The following is a list of Aggie's men who are 
assisting Uncle Sam in the defence of humanity and 
the nation's honor, as members of the army and navy: 

'73.— William F. Childs, Ills. Regiment. 

'74.— William H. Mitchell, Ills. Regiment. 

'74.— Capt. Wallis O. Clark, 12th U. S. Infantry. 

'77.— Capt. Walter M. Dickinson, 17th U. S. 
Infantry. 

'82.— Richard B. Harris, 5th U. S. Cavalry. 
'85. — Surg. George H. Barber, U. S. Army. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



195 



'87.^ — William N. Tolman, Coast Signal Service. 
■94. Elias D. White. Co. A, 2nd Georgia Infantry. 
'95. Henry W. Lewis, Battery M, 1st Reg. Mass. 
Heavy Art. 

'96.— Francis E. DeLuce, Co. G. 22nd Reg. U. S. 
Vols., Batallion of Engineers. 

'96. — Walter B. Harper, Principal musician, 2nd 
Regt, Va. Vols. 

'98.— Harvey R. Atkins, Co. I, 2nd Mass. Vol. 

'99. — George F. Keenan, U. S. Navy. 

'99.— Cliffard E. Stacy, Battery D, 1st Mass. Reg. 
Heavy Art. 

1900.— Frank H. Brown, Serg't, Battery D, 1st 
Mass., Reg. Heavy Art. 

1900.— Arthur F. Frost, Battery D, 1st Mass., 
Reg. Heavy Art. 

1900.— Alfred D. Gile, Corp. Battery D, 1st Mass. 
Reg. Heavy Art. 

1900.— Edward B. Saunders, Battery D, 1st Mass. 
Reg. Heavy Art. 

1900.— Henry E. Walker, 8th Reg. Mass. Vol. 

1901.— Herbert A. Paul, 8th Reg. Mass. Vol. 



'75. — P. Mirick Harwood, Prop. Hotel Barre, 
Barre, Mass. 

'82. — F. Waldo Jones ex-'82. Master of Grammar 
school, Pawtucket, R. I. 

'87. — William N. Tolman to Miss Maude Andrews 
of New York city, married April 23, 1898, at Rox- 
bury, Mass. 

'88. — Albert l.Hayward,Sup't of farm, State Home 
and School, Providence, R. I. 

'91. — Walter C. Paige, goes as a delegate to Y. M. 
C. A. convention in Switzerland this summer, 

— '91.— The marriage of Cornelius M. Du Bois to- 
Miss Mary Sprague Wood is announced to take place 
at Winthrop, June the twenty-ninth. 

'92. — Henry N. Eaton ex-'92. Florist and market- 
gardener. South Sudbury, Mass. 

'93.— Dr. Henry D. Clark D. V. S., 69 School 
St., Milford, Mass. 

'93. — A. Edward Melendy, Employ Washburn & 
Moan manuf'g Co., Worcester, Mass. 4 Dover St., 
Worcester. 



'94. — Dr. Claude F. Walker, who has for the past 
year been assistant in chemistry at Kent Chemi- 
cal Laboratory of Yale University, has accepted a 
position at the State Normal School, Moorland, 
Minn., where he will have entire charge of the depart- 
ment of Physics and Chemistry, 

'94. — S. Francis Howard, Address for the summer 
Wilbraham, Mas. 

'95.: — Mr. R. A. Cooley, ass't entomologist at the 
Hatch Experiment Station, spent several days last week 
looking up the work in the eastern part of the state. 

'95. — George A. Billings, Chemist and Superin- 
tendant of the Walker-Gordon Laboratory, 2112 
Michigan Avenue, Chicago, ill. 

'95. Harry E. Clark, Ornamental gardener, Mid- 
dlebury. Conn. 

'95. — Henry W. Lewis, Battery M., 1st Reg. 
Heavy Artillery. 

'95. — Wright Asahel Root, to Miss Anna Juanita 
Wight, married Wednesday, the first of June at 
Deerfield, Mass, At home after June 13, at Brews- 
ter Court, No/thampton. 

'96. — Stephen W. Fletcher, Cornell University, 
Ithaca, N. Y. Mr. Fletcher has passed examinations 
for the degree of M. S. and intends to continue his 
studies there for the degree of Ph. D., with major 
subject in horticulture under Prof. Bailey, minors in 
mycology and sysmatic botany under Profs. Atkinson 
and Rowlee. 

'96.— Francis E. De Luce, Co. G. 22nd R'g't U, 
S. Volunteers, Batallion of Engineers, Millets Point, 
N. Y. Mr. De Luce visited friends in town last week, 
having received a furlough. 

'96. — Albin M. Kramer, with Annan & Blakes- 
lee, civil engineers and land surveyors, Clinton, Mass. 

'96. — B. Kent Jones, who was recently elected to 
the chair of Agriculture and Chemistry at the North 
Carolina Agricultural and Mechanical college, Green- 
boro, N. C. has decided not to accept the position. 

'96. — Frederick H. Reid, is spending a few days 
at the home of his mother, in Amherst. 

'97. — Charles A. Norton, who is with the Lowell 
Dry Plate Co., N. Y, city, paid a visit to friends in 
town last week. 

'97, — Charles A. Peters has resigned his position 



ig6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



as assistant at the Chemical Laboratory, and will 
enter the graduate course of Yale University in the 
fall. Mr. Peters has recently been awarded a schol- 
arship at Yale. 

'97. — James L. Bartlett, Weather Bureau, Savan- 
nah, Ga. 

1900.— H. E. Walker has joined the 8th Mass. 
Volunteer Reg't. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 



To those interested in colonial history The Bradford 
History of Plymouth Plantation, from the original nian- 
uscript will be of especial value. It is a history of 
Plymouth Colony, chiefly in the form of annals, 
extending from the inception of the colony down to the 
year 1647. The book is put forth that the public may 
know what manner of men the Pilgrims were, through 
what perils and vicissitudes they passed and how much 
we of to-day owe to their devotion and determination. 



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